Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson Reviews

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Jan 21, 2021

    Ken Burns resurrects a great American story: that of a self-made man (and the country that stood against him) who became the first African American heavyweight champion. Simply a great story of rugged individualism. Worth more than one viewing.

    Ken Burns resurrects a great American story: that of a self-made man (and the country that stood against him) who became the first African American heavyweight champion. Simply a great story of rugged individualism. Worth more than one viewing.

  • Jan 19, 2020

    One the best biographical documentaries I have seen. The depiction of Jack Johnson's life portrays one magnetizing human being. The documentary takes us through the context of the times, the atmosphere and the mores of that era, and one great soul that simply cannot be defined by his externalities.

    One the best biographical documentaries I have seen. The depiction of Jack Johnson's life portrays one magnetizing human being. The documentary takes us through the context of the times, the atmosphere and the mores of that era, and one great soul that simply cannot be defined by his externalities.

  • Mar 06, 2019

    Another Ken Burns' PBS Home Video. The greatest heavyweight boxer in American history...Jack Johnson. Confident, smiling and proud, Jack Johnson rose from oblivion to fight his way to the top of the boxing profession in the early 1900's. During a time of extreme bigotry and strict social rules, Johnson dared to be not just a black person, but a MAN. He lived hard and fast, dated and married white women, and became known as a "sport" because of his debonair clothing and manner. And he looked white men in the eye as an equal (NOT allowed at that time). Raw hatred by the "white race" against a black "animal" who dared to think himself equal to or even better than them!

    Another Ken Burns' PBS Home Video. The greatest heavyweight boxer in American history...Jack Johnson. Confident, smiling and proud, Jack Johnson rose from oblivion to fight his way to the top of the boxing profession in the early 1900's. During a time of extreme bigotry and strict social rules, Johnson dared to be not just a black person, but a MAN. He lived hard and fast, dated and married white women, and became known as a "sport" because of his debonair clothing and manner. And he looked white men in the eye as an equal (NOT allowed at that time). Raw hatred by the "white race" against a black "animal" who dared to think himself equal to or even better than them!

  • Mar 06, 2019

    http://filmreviewsnsuch.blogspot.com/2016/02/unforgivable-blackness-rise-and-fall-of_12.html

    http://filmreviewsnsuch.blogspot.com/2016/02/unforgivable-blackness-rise-and-fall-of_12.html

  • Mar 06, 2019

    An amazing documentary about a complicated American. Further evidence that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

    An amazing documentary about a complicated American. Further evidence that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

  • Mar 06, 2019

    A great historical documentary on boxing, black history and American culture through the larger than life figure Jack Johnson. http://youtu.be/Ex1TX2Vp3pQ

    A great historical documentary on boxing, black history and American culture through the larger than life figure Jack Johnson. http://youtu.be/Ex1TX2Vp3pQ

  • Mar 06, 2019

    David is the perfect narrator and Jackson is amazing as Johnson. A true hero for boxers, an idol for hedonists and a pioneer of conspicuous consumption and reckless driving. All the more remarkable for doing what he liked a century ago. The amount of racism back then is RIDICULOUS. It's hard to imagine the world before World War 1. The first movie shown at the White House was Birth of a Nation!? Ooooo... He really shouldn't have fought the younger, taller opponent. Strangely it doesn't mention the wrench patent he got while in prison. 3.5 hours was longer than necessary.

    David is the perfect narrator and Jackson is amazing as Johnson. A true hero for boxers, an idol for hedonists and a pioneer of conspicuous consumption and reckless driving. All the more remarkable for doing what he liked a century ago. The amount of racism back then is RIDICULOUS. It's hard to imagine the world before World War 1. The first movie shown at the White House was Birth of a Nation!? Ooooo... He really shouldn't have fought the younger, taller opponent. Strangely it doesn't mention the wrench patent he got while in prison. 3.5 hours was longer than necessary.

  • Mar 06, 2019

    The 2nd half drags a bit but the first half is so intriguing and there are great spots throughout. As usual Ken Burns is gold.

    The 2nd half drags a bit but the first half is so intriguing and there are great spots throughout. As usual Ken Burns is gold.

  • Sep 09, 2016

    Exceptional, so much so that the incredible length of it is not noticed at all

    Exceptional, so much so that the incredible length of it is not noticed at all

  • May 27, 2014

    One of the best specials I've ever seen.

    One of the best specials I've ever seen.