The Wackness Reviews

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September 16, 2008
THE WACKNESS is one of those small little movies that come under the radar and sneak up on you.
September 8, 2008
Over-hyped.
August 29, 2008
The Wackness, while no masterpiece, is the kind of film that doesn't come to much but is watchable as it saunters along with a provoking sense of meaningful pessimism. The performances are really the thing - Levine hasn't managed anything better.
August 29, 2008
The direction is unlikeably murky and unfocused but this is more dope than wack - and a guaranteed four-star movie if you're already stoned yourself.
August 29, 2008
The film's forlorn charm is a little reminiscent of Cameron Crowe's adolescent memoir Almost Famous. It's a tiny bit soppy, too, but you can forgive that in a teenager.
August 29, 2008
The Wackness is a teen drama, set in 1994 against a backdrop of laidback hip-hop and a roasting hot New York which tries just a bit too hard to be cool. But it is definitely not wack (bad).
August 29, 2008
Kingsley is likewise on form and hits home with some terrifically world-weary one liners, while director Jon Levine brings a refreshing inventiveness to the film.
August 29, 2008
It's a reasonably promising debut, though, and Sir Ben looks as though he had a lot of fun, not least when he's deflowering Mary-Kate Olsen, surprisingly funny as the planet's last remaining hippy.
August 29, 2008
It's not quite da bomb, but this nostalgic throwback to the recent past still has enough phat acting (especially from Sir Ben) and slammin' scenes to seem both fly and fresh. Worth catching? Damn skippy.
August 29, 2008
The Wackness offers more than fuzzy giggles and bongwater-weak characters.
August 29, 2008
Levine's film is often showy, clumsy, over-earnest. But then so are its characters. So is late adolescence. The Wackness carries out the advice Squires gives to Luke - make a mess, embrace pain. In doing so, it ends up anything but wack.
August 29, 2008
Its writer-director, Jonathan Levine, lavishes the movie with inky black shadows and soft gauzy close-ups, making it mostly feel like a dream, or a half-conjured memory.
August 29, 2008
An amiable but essentially empty film made enjoyable by a decent soundtrack, funny dialogue and Ben Kingsley's mad doctor.
August 29, 2008
Kingsley's shamelessly zingy performance adds welcome pep, and a delicate, achingly sincere summertime idyll on Fire Island offers notice of Levine's evident promise.
August 29, 2008
An unlikely buddy comedy that comes to life whenever Kingsley appears - he doesn't so much steal the show as roll it into a fat blunt and smoke it.
August 28, 2008
By Doug Cooper - It's a quirky, offbeat affair, meandering at times but honest and amusing too.
August 15, 2008
Levine has an eye for detail and the germ of what Stephen Colbert might call a "truthy" idea - that it is possible, even through a chemically induced fog of numbness, to genuinely feel for another person.
August 10, 2008
When all is said and done, it's not perfect, but it's strong nonetheless...
August 1, 2008
The loose plot feels imposed on the offbeat characters, and doesn't link the people and incidents together in any satisfying way.
August 1, 2008
That first sight of Ben Kingsley sucking down a bowl will burn into your memory. You may be watching The Wackness but it's hard to forget that this is Gandhi putting Bic to bong in Jonathan Levine's silly, sappy and sympathetic coming-of-age memoir.
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