We're Going to Eat You Reviews

  • Oct 10, 2015

    Reading the back of the box you get a sense that you're getting into something unique and different. Yes, there are cannibals, people getting eaten, and kung fu. But while the movie started off with a sort of Cannibal Holocaust kind of vibe, it quickly devolved into a generic kung fu movie. Nothing wrong with that, but it didn't really stand out and outside of a few fights (the tree hanging one for example) none of it was very memorable. The cannibalism plays a big part of the movie, but they're not tribal people and they're not quite as maniacal as you would hope. The main villain is mad, but most of the townsfolk are portrayed more as desperate and hungry. It was a decent watch, but not as special as I was hoping. It does have one of the best lines ever though: "I'll feed you my farts." Classic.

    Reading the back of the box you get a sense that you're getting into something unique and different. Yes, there are cannibals, people getting eaten, and kung fu. But while the movie started off with a sort of Cannibal Holocaust kind of vibe, it quickly devolved into a generic kung fu movie. Nothing wrong with that, but it didn't really stand out and outside of a few fights (the tree hanging one for example) none of it was very memorable. The cannibalism plays a big part of the movie, but they're not tribal people and they're not quite as maniacal as you would hope. The main villain is mad, but most of the townsfolk are portrayed more as desperate and hungry. It was a decent watch, but not as special as I was hoping. It does have one of the best lines ever though: "I'll feed you my farts." Classic.

  • Nov 06, 2012

    Tsui Hark and first time writer Szeto Cheuk-hon have all the wry stuff here and pull off the daunting task of synchronizing cannibalism, comedy, and kung fu in near-perfect harmony. Only when a reoccurring gag, featuring a randy Amazon woman (quite obviously an actor in drag), does the writing falter. And yet given that the epicenter of "We're Going to Eat You" is a remote village of cannibals -- fed by a group of Leatherface indebted butchers -- it's strangely fitting.

    Tsui Hark and first time writer Szeto Cheuk-hon have all the wry stuff here and pull off the daunting task of synchronizing cannibalism, comedy, and kung fu in near-perfect harmony. Only when a reoccurring gag, featuring a randy Amazon woman (quite obviously an actor in drag), does the writing falter. And yet given that the epicenter of "We're Going to Eat You" is a remote village of cannibals -- fed by a group of Leatherface indebted butchers -- it's strangely fitting.

  • Apr 11, 2012

    Crazy Kung-Fu/Gore/Cannibal/Comedy Hybrid!!

    Crazy Kung-Fu/Gore/Cannibal/Comedy Hybrid!!

  • Feb 04, 2012

    One of my favorite kung fu/martial arts movies ever. Amazing fight scenes mixed in with an excellent horror movie theme - mixed yet again with a special agent type character and comedy - you cant ask for much more in a movie than what you get here. Indescribibly entertaining - an absolutely perfect movie.

    One of my favorite kung fu/martial arts movies ever. Amazing fight scenes mixed in with an excellent horror movie theme - mixed yet again with a special agent type character and comedy - you cant ask for much more in a movie than what you get here. Indescribibly entertaining - an absolutely perfect movie.

  • Lee ? Super Reviewer
    Jun 04, 2011

    Crazy action-comedy-horror from Hong Kong about a village full of cannibals who trap and butcher travellers to satisfy their cravings for human flesh. A bizarre mix of cannibalism, kung-fu and slapstick humour with each of these elements having varied success. There's a bit of gore but not enough for my liking. The fight scenes are decent enough but lack the fast-paced excitement of a Jet Li or Jackie Chan flick. It's funny at times but no real laugh out loud moments. A good fun and unique film overall, check it out.

    Crazy action-comedy-horror from Hong Kong about a village full of cannibals who trap and butcher travellers to satisfy their cravings for human flesh. A bizarre mix of cannibalism, kung-fu and slapstick humour with each of these elements having varied success. There's a bit of gore but not enough for my liking. The fight scenes are decent enough but lack the fast-paced excitement of a Jet Li or Jackie Chan flick. It's funny at times but no real laugh out loud moments. A good fun and unique film overall, check it out.

  • Jun 10, 2010

    Kung fu x Cannabalism x Cult

    Kung fu x Cannabalism x Cult

  • May 06, 2010

    Consdering it's apparent lack of uniting style or common film language, the Hong Kong New Wave might best be defined by it's relation to tradition and it's constant revision of it. With his first films, Tsui Hark personifies this notion, piecing new genre constellations together by using both local and Western models. The insane genre bender We're Going To Eat You is a delightfully irreverent conversation with your typical kung fu classic, with bold camera angles and graphic violence borrowed from Western exploitation films, and at the same time a metaphorical comment on the cannibalistic horrors of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. An early, edgier version of Tsui Hark.

    Consdering it's apparent lack of uniting style or common film language, the Hong Kong New Wave might best be defined by it's relation to tradition and it's constant revision of it. With his first films, Tsui Hark personifies this notion, piecing new genre constellations together by using both local and Western models. The insane genre bender We're Going To Eat You is a delightfully irreverent conversation with your typical kung fu classic, with bold camera angles and graphic violence borrowed from Western exploitation films, and at the same time a metaphorical comment on the cannibalistic horrors of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. An early, edgier version of Tsui Hark.

  • Apr 02, 2010

    The best kung-fun, cannibal comedy you'll ever see, and that's a fact. There's a fight a roller skates, a guy takes a break in the middle of a fight to roll a cigarette on his opponent's face, and the film is just overflowing with Tsui Hark's unqiue energy and political subversion. At one time Tsui Hark was the most dangerous filmmaker working in Hong Kong, and this film is one of his best.

    The best kung-fun, cannibal comedy you'll ever see, and that's a fact. There's a fight a roller skates, a guy takes a break in the middle of a fight to roll a cigarette on his opponent's face, and the film is just overflowing with Tsui Hark's unqiue energy and political subversion. At one time Tsui Hark was the most dangerous filmmaker working in Hong Kong, and this film is one of his best.

  • Aug 11, 2009

    Frankly speaking, this is not a recommendable film unless you are a big fan of Hong Kong movie. Hark Tsui's 2nd feature filmed when he was 30. It's a kungfu action film with an eccentric and absurd plot that a cop fights with cannibals in a rural village. There are a lot of grotesque scenes, and the characters are all crazy. It's featuring the two action stars of 70s and 80s - Norman Chu and Eddy Ko. Screenplay is by Hark himself and Roy Szeto, who now is a big writer, and this is his debut as a writer. Kungfu movements, designed by later a famous director Corey Yuen who directs "Transporter" in Hollywood, are great and fun to watch, although it is a little bit lengthy. This film is important to analyze Tsui Hark as a film auteur, because so many elements of his later films are already used in this film, such as fancy camera angles, original use of music like music for Chinese traditional opera, unique sense of humour, quick cutting, scenes of vomitting, the story evolution which changes again and again, etc.

    Frankly speaking, this is not a recommendable film unless you are a big fan of Hong Kong movie. Hark Tsui's 2nd feature filmed when he was 30. It's a kungfu action film with an eccentric and absurd plot that a cop fights with cannibals in a rural village. There are a lot of grotesque scenes, and the characters are all crazy. It's featuring the two action stars of 70s and 80s - Norman Chu and Eddy Ko. Screenplay is by Hark himself and Roy Szeto, who now is a big writer, and this is his debut as a writer. Kungfu movements, designed by later a famous director Corey Yuen who directs "Transporter" in Hollywood, are great and fun to watch, although it is a little bit lengthy. This film is important to analyze Tsui Hark as a film auteur, because so many elements of his later films are already used in this film, such as fancy camera angles, original use of music like music for Chinese traditional opera, unique sense of humour, quick cutting, scenes of vomitting, the story evolution which changes again and again, etc.

  • Dec 13, 2008

    A macabre kungfu flick. Pretty original. Slows down around the middle of the movie. Couldnt finish this one all the way cuz it was the tail end of an all nighter. The choreography is impressive and features some good blood and gore

    A macabre kungfu flick. Pretty original. Slows down around the middle of the movie. Couldnt finish this one all the way cuz it was the tail end of an all nighter. The choreography is impressive and features some good blood and gore