Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe (2003)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Movie Info

A short film exactly described by its title. German film director Herzog had made a bet with fledgling director Errol Morris that, if Morris made a film, Herzog would eat his shoe. Morris went on to film 'Gates of Heaven', so Herzog kept his promise. While eating the boiled shoe, Herzog carries on a dialogue with the film premier audience on film, art, and life.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Cult Movies , Documentary , Drama , Special Interest
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:

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Critic Reviews for Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe

All Critics (0)

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Full Review… | February 6, 2012
Not Coming to a Theater Near You

Audience Reviews for Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe

½

More an advertisement for Errol Morris' Gates of Heaven than actual shoe-eating, Herzog's ridiculous gimmick would've been better served by actually showing what the title promised instead of offering meandering thoughts about the nature of filmmaking and limp attempts at social commentary.

Reece Leonard
Reece Leonard
½

Werner Herzog pledged to Erol Morris that if Morris finished a film, then Herzog would eat his shoe. Morris continued to make Gates oh Heaven, and Herzog is a man of his word. I actually prefer this to Gates of Heaven, which Herzog would say is rubbish opinion, but this was just so funny and entertaining. I actually wanted to be in the audience of Herzog eating his shoe. Twenty minutes was not enough, I could watch this again at any given time, enjoyable little documentary. But opposite of what I did I would recommend watching this before Gates of Heaven.

Daniel Dolgin
Daniel Dolgin

Super Reviewer

½

The title of this short film pretty much says it all. When Errol Morris was still a fledgling director, he was given encouragement by Werner Herzog who told him that, if he completed a a feature film, he would eat one of his own shoes. Well, Morris made that film (Gates of Heaven), and Herzog, a man of his word, made good on the bet, which was captured by Les Blank, who, spurred by his experience here, agreed to follow Herzog into the jungle to capture the making of Fitzcarraldo, and that project became Blank's film Burden of Dreams. When I say the title says it all, I'm not kidding. There's a bit more to it than that, mostly stuff that illustrates Herzog's personality and beliefs, but this really is pretty straightforward. To put it in just a few words: this is odd, charming, and pure Werner Herzog.

Chris Weber
Chris Weber

Super Reviewer

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