What We Left Behind: Looking Back at Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reviews

  • 2d ago

    huge DS9 fan! an incredible look into the history of the show from the creators and cast! a must see for any true DS9 fan

    huge DS9 fan! an incredible look into the history of the show from the creators and cast! a must see for any true DS9 fan

  • Nov 09, 2019

    One of the most adorable documentaries I have ever seen.

    One of the most adorable documentaries I have ever seen.

  • Oct 22, 2019

    Am I the only one that felt bait and switched here? Given the beautiful tribute from Aron Eisenberg that came to light posthumously, I can only wonder what other rich content was sacrificed for one more opinion and carefully lit shot of Bluebeard and his dark glasses. Did he really have to commandeer 80% of the content of this thing? He wasn't that interesting, and neither was his staff meeting. Everything I hoped to see here was hinted in the preview and then got cut. I hope the rest of the cast doesn't have to follow Aron through the wormhole before we get to see those parts.

    Am I the only one that felt bait and switched here? Given the beautiful tribute from Aron Eisenberg that came to light posthumously, I can only wonder what other rich content was sacrificed for one more opinion and carefully lit shot of Bluebeard and his dark glasses. Did he really have to commandeer 80% of the content of this thing? He wasn't that interesting, and neither was his staff meeting. Everything I hoped to see here was hinted in the preview and then got cut. I hope the rest of the cast doesn't have to follow Aron through the wormhole before we get to see those parts.

  • Aug 23, 2019

    This brought my my younger years and my absolute love of Star Trek. Deep Space Nine was by far my favorite series, and I have seen them all many times over.

    This brought my my younger years and my absolute love of Star Trek. Deep Space Nine was by far my favorite series, and I have seen them all many times over.

  • Aug 08, 2019

    territif doc. reminds you how good and ahead of it's time the show was/is. feels modern. but it's funny and has some great stuff on what an 8th season would look like. the HD scenes look great as opposed to what you can see on netflix and cbsaa... very fun and light and a few serious moments... great for fans or people who missed the boat

    territif doc. reminds you how good and ahead of it's time the show was/is. feels modern. but it's funny and has some great stuff on what an 8th season would look like. the HD scenes look great as opposed to what you can see on netflix and cbsaa... very fun and light and a few serious moments... great for fans or people who missed the boat

  • Jul 02, 2019

    A gift for the fans The Gene Roddenberry-created Star Trek and Star Trek: The Next Generation were shows built around idealism, about exploration and diplomacy, about how hope should never be lost. And then came Deep Space Nine, or, to use a moniker originally intended as derogatory, "dark Star Trek". Although created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, the real creative force was Ira Steven Behr, and long before the Second Golden Age of Television, he moulded the show into occupying a fascinating middle-ground between episodic storytelling and serialisation. Indeed, this is one of the reasons why it has proved so popular on Netflix - it lends itself to binge-watching so as to get a better sense of the overarching narrative tapestry. What We Left Behind: Looking Back at Star Trek: Deep Space Nine is a partly fan-funded documentary directed by Behr and David Zappone. The first point to make, and it's one I can't over-emphasise, is that it's worth the price of admission just for the 22 minutes of HD clips. Obviously, the space stuff looks truly amazing, with the epic battle scenes from "Sacrifice of Angels" standing up against today's CGI. But even the smaller moments pop - the colours are so much richer, the blacks and shadows so much deeper, the makeup more nuanced, the background detail more noticeable. To their credit, Behr and Zappone don't shy away from looking at some of the more painful moments - Avery Brooks being forbidden from having a goatee and a shaved head, so as not to appear "too street" (to quote then Paramount Television chairman Kerry McCluggage); Rick Berman not understanding why Behr wanted to introduce a war storyline; Terry Farrell asking to be written out with only one season left because she felt she was being mistreated; the entire cast (except Colm Meaney) not happy with the arrival of TNG's Michael Dorn; the psychological toll that playing Benny Russell in the masterful "Far Beyond the Stars" took on Avery Brooks. The film also spends a lot of time looking at some of the show's more politically charged moments. Terrorism, for example, was built into its DNA in Kira Nerys (Nana Visitor), with the show depicting her as suffering from PTSD and survivor guilt. It also reminds us how PTSD was addressed when Nog (Aron Eisenberg) lost a leg in battle. The film presents several military vets attesting how much it spoke to them to see DS9 handling such weighty themes. In relation to LGBTQ+ issues, the film points to the lesbian kiss in "Rejoined" and the rumour that Garak (Andrew Robinson) was gay. In relation to this, Behr laments that he could have done better, that one kiss and one rumour over seven years wasn't enough. Racism was never addressed more explicitly or more successfully than in "Far Beyond the Stars", which features the most emotionally devastating and powerfully acted moment in the franchise's history. Furthermore, although DS9 was not the first show with a black lead, that was A Man Called Hawk, it was the first show to regularly feature scenes with only black characters. In relation to this, Behr is unable to contain his frustration when he says an episode of That's So 90s pointed to Homicide: Life on the Streets as the first show to feature scenes of all black characters, never even mentioning DS9. And with that said, if the film has an overriding theme, it's vindication; the sense that the choices the showrunners made have stood the test of time. A good example is the three-part second season opener. The first three-episode arc in Star Trek history, the idea was met with considerable resistance. However, as the show would go on to prove time and again (ultimately doing an unprecedented ten-episode arc), being on a space station rather than a ship lent itself to multi-episode storylines. In terms of problems, the most significant is the absence of Avery Brooks (the interview footage is archival). A tenured Professor of Theatre at Rutgers, Brooks has gradually retired from film and TV acting and has appeared at fewer and fewer Star Trek events, so obviously, Behr was unable to persuade him to appear here. Another problem is that Behr lets both Berman and McCluggage off too easily, especially in relation to Terry Farrell. He also occasionally "stops" the film to intercut scripted moments involving himself. As the director and primary subject, this is self-indulgent, and the scenes are both structurally awkward and thematically unnecessary. That aside, however, What We Left Behind is an exceptional documentary, reminding us that DS9 was often bleak but never cynical, often pessimistic but never nihilistic. The interviews with the cast and crew really drive home just how much it changed their lives, whilst the clips of fans talking about why they love it so much illustrate how it touched people. And given that DS9 was so long maligned, it's pleasantly ironic that What We Left Behind is about the love which the show has engendered.

    A gift for the fans The Gene Roddenberry-created Star Trek and Star Trek: The Next Generation were shows built around idealism, about exploration and diplomacy, about how hope should never be lost. And then came Deep Space Nine, or, to use a moniker originally intended as derogatory, "dark Star Trek". Although created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, the real creative force was Ira Steven Behr, and long before the Second Golden Age of Television, he moulded the show into occupying a fascinating middle-ground between episodic storytelling and serialisation. Indeed, this is one of the reasons why it has proved so popular on Netflix - it lends itself to binge-watching so as to get a better sense of the overarching narrative tapestry. What We Left Behind: Looking Back at Star Trek: Deep Space Nine is a partly fan-funded documentary directed by Behr and David Zappone. The first point to make, and it's one I can't over-emphasise, is that it's worth the price of admission just for the 22 minutes of HD clips. Obviously, the space stuff looks truly amazing, with the epic battle scenes from "Sacrifice of Angels" standing up against today's CGI. But even the smaller moments pop - the colours are so much richer, the blacks and shadows so much deeper, the makeup more nuanced, the background detail more noticeable. To their credit, Behr and Zappone don't shy away from looking at some of the more painful moments - Avery Brooks being forbidden from having a goatee and a shaved head, so as not to appear "too street" (to quote then Paramount Television chairman Kerry McCluggage); Rick Berman not understanding why Behr wanted to introduce a war storyline; Terry Farrell asking to be written out with only one season left because she felt she was being mistreated; the entire cast (except Colm Meaney) not happy with the arrival of TNG's Michael Dorn; the psychological toll that playing Benny Russell in the masterful "Far Beyond the Stars" took on Avery Brooks. The film also spends a lot of time looking at some of the show's more politically charged moments. Terrorism, for example, was built into its DNA in Kira Nerys (Nana Visitor), with the show depicting her as suffering from PTSD and survivor guilt. It also reminds us how PTSD was addressed when Nog (Aron Eisenberg) lost a leg in battle. The film presents several military vets attesting how much it spoke to them to see DS9 handling such weighty themes. In relation to LGBTQ+ issues, the film points to the lesbian kiss in "Rejoined" and the rumour that Garak (Andrew Robinson) was gay. In relation to this, Behr laments that he could have done better, that one kiss and one rumour over seven years wasn't enough. Racism was never addressed more explicitly or more successfully than in "Far Beyond the Stars", which features the most emotionally devastating and powerfully acted moment in the franchise's history. Furthermore, although DS9 was not the first show with a black lead, that was A Man Called Hawk, it was the first show to regularly feature scenes with only black characters. In relation to this, Behr is unable to contain his frustration when he says an episode of That's So 90s pointed to Homicide: Life on the Streets as the first show to feature scenes of all black characters, never even mentioning DS9. And with that said, if the film has an overriding theme, it's vindication; the sense that the choices the showrunners made have stood the test of time. A good example is the three-part second season opener. The first three-episode arc in Star Trek history, the idea was met with considerable resistance. However, as the show would go on to prove time and again (ultimately doing an unprecedented ten-episode arc), being on a space station rather than a ship lent itself to multi-episode storylines. In terms of problems, the most significant is the absence of Avery Brooks (the interview footage is archival). A tenured Professor of Theatre at Rutgers, Brooks has gradually retired from film and TV acting and has appeared at fewer and fewer Star Trek events, so obviously, Behr was unable to persuade him to appear here. Another problem is that Behr lets both Berman and McCluggage off too easily, especially in relation to Terry Farrell. He also occasionally "stops" the film to intercut scripted moments involving himself. As the director and primary subject, this is self-indulgent, and the scenes are both structurally awkward and thematically unnecessary. That aside, however, What We Left Behind is an exceptional documentary, reminding us that DS9 was often bleak but never cynical, often pessimistic but never nihilistic. The interviews with the cast and crew really drive home just how much it changed their lives, whilst the clips of fans talking about why they love it so much illustrate how it touched people. And given that DS9 was so long maligned, it's pleasantly ironic that What We Left Behind is about the love which the show has engendered.

  • May 30, 2019

    Absolutely loved this documentary! Aside from fun interviews with cast members, the writing room re-assembled to storyboard the first episode of a hypothetical next season of Star Trek: Deep Space 9. They also discussed what they wish they had done differently. Being a fan, I really wish they had the opportunity to go deeper on some topics, but they did well with the time limit they had. Plus the HD remaster of some original footage looks fantastic. Highly recommend for any Star Trek fan!

    Absolutely loved this documentary! Aside from fun interviews with cast members, the writing room re-assembled to storyboard the first episode of a hypothetical next season of Star Trek: Deep Space 9. They also discussed what they wish they had done differently. Being a fan, I really wish they had the opportunity to go deeper on some topics, but they did well with the time limit they had. Plus the HD remaster of some original footage looks fantastic. Highly recommend for any Star Trek fan!

  • Kerry
    May 30, 2019

    Not nearly enough Bashir & Garak for me!

    Not nearly enough Bashir & Garak for me!

  • Jason M
    May 29, 2019

    It was a little bit boring. Not as entertaining as I thought it would be. And it did not seem that Avery Brooks was really involved, but I could be wrong. Worth the time, though.

    It was a little bit boring. Not as entertaining as I thought it would be. And it did not seem that Avery Brooks was really involved, but I could be wrong. Worth the time, though.

  • Steven P
    May 29, 2019

    Im not usually enough of a fan of anything to seek out documentaries about a show or movie. DS9 was special, though, so I happily donated to the campaign and was excited for this release. I decided to skip out on the early streaming access to see it in a theater, and Im happy I did. Great show, and I really enjoyed it. Thanks for a great service to the fans of the best Trek!

    Im not usually enough of a fan of anything to seek out documentaries about a show or movie. DS9 was special, though, so I happily donated to the campaign and was excited for this release. I decided to skip out on the early streaming access to see it in a theater, and Im happy I did. Great show, and I really enjoyed it. Thanks for a great service to the fans of the best Trek!