White Mane Reviews

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Review In A Nutshell: After being underwhelmed by Albert Lamorisse's The Red Balloon, I really didn't know whether or not this one would appeal to me; it also didn't help that out of the two films, this is the lesser regarded one. 40 minutes after popping the disc in, I was impressed with what it had to offer. It's execution of the film's simple story is much less sentimental as compared to The Red Balloon, and that is one of the reasons why this film worked so much with me. White Mane doesn't dampen the connection between the horse and the boy with forced tear-jerking emotions; instead it visually captures it in an authentic and ambiguous light. The film's climax, I felt, could have been improved with a bit more intensity but thankfully its melancholy conclusion nearly forgave the lacklustre event that preceded it. The film doesn't spend all of its time on the relationship between the horse and the boy, as other times the film shows the audience other aspects of the horse's environment, like physical confrontation in order to determine who is the more dominant animal and the idea of rescuing your fellow species and ensuring they can keep their freedom, the film was able to go through all of this in a matter of 40 minutes. Though visually ambiguous, White Mane features a reliable narrator that provides enough internal detail of the characters to gain a minimal understanding on what the director is trying to project. White Mane with its minor issues, prevent it from being perfect but it does enough to impress, and done so within a short amount of time. If one wasn't impressed with Lamorisse's take on The Red Balloon, then definitely give this one a try as it might prove more valuable.

    Review In A Nutshell: After being underwhelmed by Albert Lamorisse's The Red Balloon, I really didn't know whether or not this one would appeal to me; it also didn't help that out of the two films, this is the lesser regarded one. 40 minutes after popping the disc in, I was impressed with what it had to offer. It's execution of the film's simple story is much less sentimental as compared to The Red Balloon, and that is one of the reasons why this film worked so much with me. White Mane doesn't dampen the connection between the horse and the boy with forced tear-jerking emotions; instead it visually captures it in an authentic and ambiguous light. The film's climax, I felt, could have been improved with a bit more intensity but thankfully its melancholy conclusion nearly forgave the lacklustre event that preceded it. The film doesn't spend all of its time on the relationship between the horse and the boy, as other times the film shows the audience other aspects of the horse's environment, like physical confrontation in order to determine who is the more dominant animal and the idea of rescuing your fellow species and ensuring they can keep their freedom, the film was able to go through all of this in a matter of 40 minutes. Though visually ambiguous, White Mane features a reliable narrator that provides enough internal detail of the characters to gain a minimal understanding on what the director is trying to project. White Mane with its minor issues, prevent it from being perfect but it does enough to impress, and done so within a short amount of time. If one wasn't impressed with Lamorisse's take on The Red Balloon, then definitely give this one a try as it might prove more valuable.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Review In A Nutshell: After being underwhelmed by Albert Lamorisse's The Red Balloon, I really didn't know whether or not this one would appeal to me; it also didn't help that out of the two films, this is the lesser regarded one. 40 minutes after popping the disc in, I was impressed with what it had to offer. It's execution of the film's simple story is much less sentimental as compared to The Red Balloon, and that is one of the reasons why this film worked so much with me. White Mane doesn't dampen the connection between the horse and the boy with forced tear-jerking emotions; instead it visually captures it in an authentic and ambiguous light. The film's climax, I felt, could have been improved with a bit more intensity but thankfully its melancholy conclusion nearly forgave the lacklustre event that preceded it. The film doesn't spend all of its time on the relationship between the horse and the boy, as other times the film shows the audience other aspects of the horse's environment, like physical confrontation in order to determine who is the more dominant animal and the idea of rescuing your fellow species and ensuring they can keep their freedom, the film was able to go through all of this in a matter of 40 minutes. Though visually ambiguous, White Mane features a reliable narrator that provides enough internal detail of the characters to gain a minimal understanding on what the director is trying to project. White Mane with its minor issues, prevent it from being perfect but it does enough to impress, and done so within a short amount of time. If one wasn't impressed with Lamorisse's take on The Red Balloon, then definitely give this one a try as it might prove more valuable.

    Review In A Nutshell: After being underwhelmed by Albert Lamorisse's The Red Balloon, I really didn't know whether or not this one would appeal to me; it also didn't help that out of the two films, this is the lesser regarded one. 40 minutes after popping the disc in, I was impressed with what it had to offer. It's execution of the film's simple story is much less sentimental as compared to The Red Balloon, and that is one of the reasons why this film worked so much with me. White Mane doesn't dampen the connection between the horse and the boy with forced tear-jerking emotions; instead it visually captures it in an authentic and ambiguous light. The film's climax, I felt, could have been improved with a bit more intensity but thankfully its melancholy conclusion nearly forgave the lacklustre event that preceded it. The film doesn't spend all of its time on the relationship between the horse and the boy, as other times the film shows the audience other aspects of the horse's environment, like physical confrontation in order to determine who is the more dominant animal and the idea of rescuing your fellow species and ensuring they can keep their freedom, the film was able to go through all of this in a matter of 40 minutes. Though visually ambiguous, White Mane features a reliable narrator that provides enough internal detail of the characters to gain a minimal understanding on what the director is trying to project. White Mane with its minor issues, prevent it from being perfect but it does enough to impress, and done so within a short amount of time. If one wasn't impressed with Lamorisse's take on The Red Balloon, then definitely give this one a try as it might prove more valuable.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    (*** 1/2): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img] A wonderful and beautiful film.

    (*** 1/2): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img] A wonderful and beautiful film.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Jul 03, 2016

    [font=Century Gothic]"White Mane" and "The Red Balloon" are two exceptional films by Albert Lamorisse about innocence and friendship in childhood. Of the two, "White Mane" is the more traditional of the two, focusing on Folco(Alain Emery), a fisher boy in the south of France, who befriends a wild horse that local men are coveting. As good as this is, it is no match for the inventively playful "The Red Balloon" which is about a young boy(Pascal Lamorisse) who finds a red balloon and their adventures in Paris. With this almost wordless film, Albert Lamorisse has complete confidence in himself as a filmmaker, composing sequences that boggle the mind as to how they were made. And if you know, please don't tell me.[/font]

    [font=Century Gothic]"White Mane" and "The Red Balloon" are two exceptional films by Albert Lamorisse about innocence and friendship in childhood. Of the two, "White Mane" is the more traditional of the two, focusing on Folco(Alain Emery), a fisher boy in the south of France, who befriends a wild horse that local men are coveting. As good as this is, it is no match for the inventively playful "The Red Balloon" which is about a young boy(Pascal Lamorisse) who finds a red balloon and their adventures in Paris. With this almost wordless film, Albert Lamorisse has complete confidence in himself as a filmmaker, composing sequences that boggle the mind as to how they were made. And if you know, please don't tell me.[/font]

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Lots of horses running around in the wild. Good photography but the story is not so gripping.

    Lots of horses running around in the wild. Good photography but the story is not so gripping.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    This was the movie I always fell asleep through. It was always on the tape with "The Red Balloon" at the library. It's probably good...they thought it was good enough to put on the same tape as "The Red Balloon" so it doesn't matter if I don't really remember much from it.

    This was the movie I always fell asleep through. It was always on the tape with "The Red Balloon" at the library. It's probably good...they thought it was good enough to put on the same tape as "The Red Balloon" so it doesn't matter if I don't really remember much from it.

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    Chris B Super Reviewer
    Jul 03, 2016

    An optimistic and poetic story of childhood and taking control of your destiny. A really well done film and one that is shot beautifully! It's only 40 minutes long and in this short time it helps to convey a lot that will make you think after the film has ended!

    An optimistic and poetic story of childhood and taking control of your destiny. A really well done film and one that is shot beautifully! It's only 40 minutes long and in this short time it helps to convey a lot that will make you think after the film has ended!

  • Jul 03, 2016

    So good! Such a cute story, well told. So impressive how they told a story with all of these horses... such a different caliber of filmmaking... I loved it.

    So good! Such a cute story, well told. So impressive how they told a story with all of these horses... such a different caliber of filmmaking... I loved it.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    A stunning short film from the master who brought us the Red Balloon. The is beautiful film about a French peasant boy who tames the infamous White Mane. Photographed to near perfection & the gorgeous use of the Southern France Landscapes. It's a joy to watch with a beautiful endearing story.

    A stunning short film from the master who brought us the Red Balloon. The is beautiful film about a French peasant boy who tames the infamous White Mane. Photographed to near perfection & the gorgeous use of the Southern France Landscapes. It's a joy to watch with a beautiful endearing story.

  • Dec 17, 2014

    I couldn't understand the dialog (no English subtitles) but what I saw was awesome.

    I couldn't understand the dialog (no English subtitles) but what I saw was awesome.