The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill Reviews

  • Jun 17, 2019

    Gruesomely self indulgent in a typically Californian banal manner.

    Gruesomely self indulgent in a typically Californian banal manner.

  • Apr 18, 2018

    Doesn't live up to its reputation. The music is cheesy as hell, totally rad if you're making an 80s corporate workplace safety video.

    Doesn't live up to its reputation. The music is cheesy as hell, totally rad if you're making an 80s corporate workplace safety video.

  • May 12, 2017

    Mark Bittner was my neighbor. He was incredible. My Howard saw him with his arms outstretched and the parrots perched all over him. Julie made a great film and those of us lucky to live on Telegraph know how amazing Mark was. The film is true and lovely.

    Mark Bittner was my neighbor. He was incredible. My Howard saw him with his arms outstretched and the parrots perched all over him. Julie made a great film and those of us lucky to live on Telegraph know how amazing Mark was. The film is true and lovely.

  • Dec 29, 2015

    This is a documentary about how a complete loser can survive for years without ever getting a job. As documentaries go it's OK, I just don't care for documentaries.

    This is a documentary about how a complete loser can survive for years without ever getting a job. As documentaries go it's OK, I just don't care for documentaries.

  • Sep 06, 2015

    Extremely moving. The parrots and their caretaker heal each other. A story about one of those weird and wonderful San Francisco characters.

    Extremely moving. The parrots and their caretaker heal each other. A story about one of those weird and wonderful San Francisco characters.

  • Sep 10, 2014

    Read the book, too. Great story.

    Read the book, too. Great story.

  • Aug 11, 2013

    Lovely peaceful film that reminds us of how lucky we are to live in San Francisco. Of course, we had a special interest, because about 20 of the flock have been feasting on our backyard juniper tree (in Glen Park... 5 miles from Telegraph Hill) for the last few weeks!

    Lovely peaceful film that reminds us of how lucky we are to live in San Francisco. Of course, we had a special interest, because about 20 of the flock have been feasting on our backyard juniper tree (in Glen Park... 5 miles from Telegraph Hill) for the last few weeks!

  • May 15, 2013

    Yes the parrots are pretty if that's your thing, but the real fascinating part of this film is the man who is obsessed with them.

    Yes the parrots are pretty if that's your thing, but the real fascinating part of this film is the man who is obsessed with them.

  • Feb 07, 2013

    Good stuff. I enjoy a good nature documentary. Bees and ants!? I love em! This is more a film-type documentary, but without much narration, it feels more like a nature documentary. That is a big plus. Bittner is a likable guy, and there's not much to say about the birds. Just watch the birds! I'm typically impressed with parrots. They are either really smart or really good at pretending to be smart. I suspect they are actually smart. Bittner accidentally becomes a scientist who studies the parrots in a sort of natural environment. So finally, I must say it made me very sad. Connor is a blue-headed parrot (that's technical terminology) among a flock of red-headed parrots. He's mild-mannered and even protective of some of the weaker birds. His fate is pretty sad. Overall, it's a pretty decent story and the birds are really lovable. But I wish I didn't know about that ending.

    Good stuff. I enjoy a good nature documentary. Bees and ants!? I love em! This is more a film-type documentary, but without much narration, it feels more like a nature documentary. That is a big plus. Bittner is a likable guy, and there's not much to say about the birds. Just watch the birds! I'm typically impressed with parrots. They are either really smart or really good at pretending to be smart. I suspect they are actually smart. Bittner accidentally becomes a scientist who studies the parrots in a sort of natural environment. So finally, I must say it made me very sad. Connor is a blue-headed parrot (that's technical terminology) among a flock of red-headed parrots. He's mild-mannered and even protective of some of the weaker birds. His fate is pretty sad. Overall, it's a pretty decent story and the birds are really lovable. But I wish I didn't know about that ending.

  • Jan 26, 2013

    The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill (2004) -- [8.0] -- Judy Irving chronicles the lives of an underemployed street musician, Mark Bittner, and a flock of wild cherry-headed parrots he observes and sometimes cares for in a hilly neighborhood of San Francisco. Bird lovers will enjoy getting to know some of the flock, including its lone blue-headed conure, Connor, who protects the weak and infirm in spite of being under-appreciated by all the red-heads around him. The film offers many theories as to how the flock got started so far from their native South America, with great evidence pointing to many of the birds being abandoned pets. Some may argue that Bittner anthropomorphizes the birds too much, and Irving wisely addresses the matter in the final minutes. I side with the filmmaker and her subject: the birds fear death, illness, and loneliness the same as we do. Bittner's assessments are well supported by Irving's footage. While there is no animal cruelty in the film, animal lovers are warned: you will need hankies to get through the movie.

    The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill (2004) -- [8.0] -- Judy Irving chronicles the lives of an underemployed street musician, Mark Bittner, and a flock of wild cherry-headed parrots he observes and sometimes cares for in a hilly neighborhood of San Francisco. Bird lovers will enjoy getting to know some of the flock, including its lone blue-headed conure, Connor, who protects the weak and infirm in spite of being under-appreciated by all the red-heads around him. The film offers many theories as to how the flock got started so far from their native South America, with great evidence pointing to many of the birds being abandoned pets. Some may argue that Bittner anthropomorphizes the birds too much, and Irving wisely addresses the matter in the final minutes. I side with the filmmaker and her subject: the birds fear death, illness, and loneliness the same as we do. Bittner's assessments are well supported by Irving's footage. While there is no animal cruelty in the film, animal lovers are warned: you will need hankies to get through the movie.