Classic Movie Guide

Classic Movie Guide is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Diana Saenger
Rating Title/Year Author
1.5/5 Supergirl (1984) A. J. Hakari Beyond nostalgia and the '80s kitsch factor, Supergirl isn't worth a whole lot of salt. EDIT
Posted Jul 4, 2010
3/5 Zachariah (1971) A. J. Hakari Zachariah waxes experimental rather than commercial and makes its relatively laid-back philosophy that easier to digest. EDIT
Posted Jun 20, 2010
3.5/5 Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman (1943) A. J. Hakari Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man is quite the class act for a B-flick, a corny but overall fun way of expanding the wide, weird world of Universal horror. EDIT
Posted May 15, 2010
3/5 Under Capricorn (1949) A. J. Hakari Several moods are adopted as the drama unfolds, keeping its many mysteries in flux. EDIT
Posted May 15, 2010
3/5 Green for Danger (1946) A. J. Hakari British potboilers are famous for their wit and complexity, and Green for Danger does its papas proud. EDIT
Posted May 9, 2010
3/5 For Your Eyes Only (1981) A. J. Hakari For Your Eyes Only is the refreshing detox the Bond series had been asking for. EDIT
Posted May 9, 2010
3/5 The Uninvited (1944) A. J. Hakari The Uninvited's craftsmanship surpasses its storytelling strengths. EDIT
Posted Apr 20, 2010
3/5 Vanishing Point (1971) A. J. Hakari Vanishing Point has its pleasant pursuits, but its mindset is better suited for the more introspective of motorheads. EDIT
Posted Apr 3, 2010
3/5 The Werewolf of London (1935) A. J. Hakari For Universal's first big lycanthropic romp, Werewolf of London is in impressive shape. EDIT
Posted Feb 13, 2010
5/5 The Wolf Man (1941) A. J. Hakari Monsters of moonlight have come and gone, but 1941's The Wolf Man remains leader of the pack. EDIT
Posted Feb 13, 2010
5/5 The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) A. J. Hakari Countless TV airings and 'stinking badges' references later, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre remains a parable that's as fascinating to ponder as it is to just watch. EDIT
Posted Jan 9, 2010
2.5/5 The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) A. J. Hakari Stephens nails the detective's restless disposition, but more than once does he veer dangerously close to drama queen territory. EDIT
Posted Dec 29, 2009
2/5 Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) A. J. Hakari The whole thing is a Darwinian nightmare, an ill-conceived attempt to parlay a taboo topic into a simple horror story. EDIT
Posted Dec 29, 2009
3.5/5 Cabaret (1972) A. J. Hakari A little bit naughty and a little bit fun, Cabaret is off-kilter goodness no matter how you slice it. EDIT
Posted Dec 13, 2009
3/5 Christmas in Connecticut (1945) A. J. Hakari It's a perfectly pleasant film with a nostalgic appeal that makes it one of the lesser-known holiday favorites but a favorite nonetheless. EDIT
Posted Dec 13, 2009
3/5 Dracula (1931) A. J. Hakari Dracula is good stuff, but it's sort of a victim of its own reputation. EDIT
Posted Nov 19, 2009
3/5 The Escape Artist (1982) A. J. Hakari ...a unique coming-of-age tale, one that may star a youngster but isn't necessarily a kids-only affair. EDIT
Posted Oct 10, 2009
3/5 Little Caesar (1930) A. J. Hakari With little gunplay to hog screen time, Little Caesar devotes more of itself to the tragedy of Rico's criminal ways. EDIT
Posted Aug 14, 2009
2.5/5 The Fly (1958) A. J. Hakari Someone's either crying or reciting a monologue, which can be a lot to endure if anthropmorphic bugs are your game. EDIT
Posted Aug 14, 2009
2/4 Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959) A. J. Hakari As classy as the '59 Journey is, it's way too buttoned-up and stodgy to truly have fun with. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/4 Journey to the Center of the Earth (2008) A. J. Hakari The action is tiresome, the 3-D is a big bother, and the characters are slim... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/5 White Zombie (1932) A. J. Hakari White Zombie suffers most from a nasty habit of prolonging scenes where, instead of generating suspense, things just kind of remain inert. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/5 Pulp (1972) A. J. Hakari ...the film wanders around aimlessly for about an hour before it comes close to piecing together something that could resemble a plot. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3/5 Blast of Silence (1961) A. J. Hakari Lonely is the life of an assassin. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 Where Eagles Dare (1969) A. J. Hakari The story isn't based on run-and-gun theatrics but stealthness, white-knuckle intensity... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 Trio (1950) A. J. Hakari ...Trio is only two-thirds of the classic it could've been. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
4/5 Touch of Evil (1958) A. J. Hakari Touch of Evil is more than deserving of its status as a noir classic... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3/5 Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) A. J. Hakari The film's job is pretty simple: come in, throw out a couple of winks at long-time Bond fans, and blow up a lot of stuff in the process. But it works. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/5 Thunderball (1965) A. J. Hakari ...it lazily slogs through its set pieces without the slightest hint of spirit or spark. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 This Gun for Hire (1942) A. J. Hakari There's quite a bit of ambition running through This Gun for Hire's veins, and it's a much more memorable movie for its efforts. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
5/5 The Sting (1973) A. J. Hakari Even eight years after I first discovered it, the movie remains an absolute joy to watch... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
4/5 Superman: The Movie (1978) A. J. Hakari The most vital aspect of Superman is that Superman himself isn't depicted as a flawless do-gooder. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3/5 State Fair (1945) A. J. Hakari I'll always have a certain amount of affection for State Fair. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 She-Wolf of London (1946) A. J. Hakari ...it's either a unique entry in the studio's horror pantheon or one of the biggest rip-offs of all time. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 Scarface (1932) A. J. Hakari Scarface is the quintessential example of the American Dream being turned on its ear. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 The Quiet Man (1952) A. J. Hakari The script has a tendency to oversimplify certain elements of the story... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 The Phantom of the Opera (1943) A. J. Hakari As a horror film, Phantom doesn't amount to anything spectacular. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
4/5 The Mummy (1932) A. J. Hakari The tragic romance is tinged with enough of the supernatural to make the story much deeper than the average fright film. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/5 Moonraker (1979) A. J. Hakari For as chintzy a demeanor as the Roger Moore movies adopted, this one really takes the cake. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 The Man With the Golden Gun (1974) A. J. Hakari Aside from a few minor hang-ups, the movie finds a way to entertain on an escapist level. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 The Living Daylights (1987) A. J. Hakari ...what The Living Daylights does is steal away Bond's thunder by slapping him in a story more fit for Schwarzenegger or Stallone... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 Licence to Kill (1989) A. J. Hakari Few people dug Timothy Dalton's turn at the James Bond wheel, but you can't deny that the man brought a certain edginess to the character. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2/5 The Last Tycoon (1976) A. J. Hakari ...in the end, it has about as much to do with the movies as Psycho had to do with shower curtains. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 The Last Man on Earth (1964) A. J. Hakari ...another low-budget endeavor from the infamous American International line that just so happens to be pretty darn good. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
2.5/5 King Kong (1976) A. J. Hakari ...the '70s take on Kong is still a fairly enjoyable flick, even if it's on a much cheesier level than some might care for. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 The Karate Kid (1984) A. J. Hakari The Karate Kid works mostly due to the worthy emotional investment put into the characters... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3/5 The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939) A. J. Hakari Rathbone's portrayal of Holmes is second to none... EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
4.5/5 Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) A. J. Hakari Hannah is about as pitch-perfect as movies can get. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3.5/5 Goldfinger (1964) A. J. Hakari It's not difficult to see why moviegoers went ga-ga for Goldfinger. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009
3/5 GoldenEye (1995) A. J. Hakari The action is crisp, the pacing is quick, and, most importantly, Brosnan proves he can wear a tux just as well as Sean Connery could. EDIT
Posted Jul 28, 2009