The Rumpus

The Rumpus is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Ade Adeniji, Arielle Bernstein, Jeffrey Edalatpour, Matt Singer, R. Emmet Sweeney, Tom Meek
Rating Title/Year Author
Django Unchained (2012) Ade Adeniji Django Unchained is a must see, full stop. At the very least, films like this are an experience. EDIT
Posted Aug 24, 2018
12 Years a Slave (2013) Ade Adeniji Birector Steve McQueen presents slavery as it happened with a camera that hangs on shots long after we're comfortable looking. The only choice is to engage with what's on screen. EDIT
Posted Aug 24, 2018
The Hangover (2009) Matt Singer In the case of The Hangover, Phillips made a decent diversion, but no classic; like its heroes you'll have a good time, then forget most of it when you wake up the following morning. It's a movie, not a film. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Up in the Air (2009) Matt Singer Up in the Air is sentimental, but that doesn't mean it's simplistic. In fact, the movie plays at some interesting contradictions. It is a genuinely funny movie about genuinely depressing times. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Inglourious Basterds (2009) Matt Singer The movie left me both exhilarated and frustrated. Not quite a masterpiece, it might qualify as a "messterpiece," an unwieldy, unfocused film with unforgettable moments that nearly get lost in a sea of excess. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The Informant! (2009) Matt Singer Like Soderbergh's Ocean's 11 series, The Informant! is a funny movie with no jokes. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (2008) Matt Singer The Mysteries of Pittsburgh would play as weak sauce in any context, but it's especially disappointing coming to theaters on the heels of the similarly themed but superiorly made Adventureland. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Hunger (2008) Matt Singer There is very little context, because on the inside, prison has no context. There is just horror. And maybe, sometimes, in the least expected places, beauty. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Sugar (2008) Matt Singer Sugar is worth seeing not because it invalidates baseball's meritocracy, or because it makes us feel guilty for enjoying the national pastime, but because it shows us with empathy and insight how baseball players are more than what they do on the field. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Watchmen (2009) Matt Singer The only way to truly adhere to Alan Moore's vision of Watchmen would be to not make the movie in the first place. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) Laura Bogart Inside Llewyn Davis forces its protagonist into making the choice that any working artist fears: the choice between selling out and giving up. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Zero Dark Thirty (2012) Laura Bogart Zero Dark Thirty doesn't indulge in breathless reveling; it's a brooding, muscular piece about obsession and vengeance. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Haywire (2011) Laura Bogart Despite its supposed intentions about introducing a new type of action hero, Haywire just affirms old archetypes. The truly subversive version of the woman warrior can wear the dress (and like it) and be a surgeon with a shotgun. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Shame (2011) Laura Bogart [Shame] evokes years of blanket forts and snow angels, spat words and fumbling reconciliation churning to the surface. This is the power of good fiction: It lets us breathe meaning into blank spaces. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Trance (2013) Tom Meek [Trance] evokes an eerie, hypnotic wonderment, consuming you and transporting you, until inevitably, the fingers snap, the eyes open, and the rapturous trance is broken. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Funny People (2009) R. Emmet Sweeney Funny People is deeply personal and intriguingly abstract, a bittersweet vision of a comedian's mournful existence. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Sunshine Cleaning (2008) Jenni Miller SunShine Cleaning is a lovely little film that's more gallows than humor. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
35 Shots of Rum (2008) Barry Jenkins 35 Shots of Rum is possibly Denis' most humanistic character study, thoughtful, endearing, and rendered with exemplary tact. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Please Give (2010) Lindsay Zoladz Please Give, Holofcener's fourth film, takes well-worn notions about giving and receiving, and lingers on them long enough that they begin to wobble, as if placed under an inch of water. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The Wrong Light (2016) Lauren Wissot The Wrong Light is disturbing on several levels. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Suited (2016) Lauren Wissot Suited is an eye-opening journey into the niche subject of dressing for success when you're a gender nonconforming individual. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Kisses (2008) Ruth McCann It's haunting and crisply vivid in parts, but definitely fuzzy around the edges. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009) Ruth McCann Though titled about as artfully as a Tomb Raider flick, Bad Lieutenant is possessed of a sleekness and a morbid sophistication that belie the unfortunate clunkiness of its title. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Wonderful World (2009) Ruth McCann Perhaps Wonderful World resonates with a limited, snarky audience: me and Ben. But I suspect the wonder reaches further. After all, if Ben teaches us anything, it's that we're all far less alone than we think. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The Kids Are All Right (2010) Ruth McCann Kids Are All Right doesn't need any ideological defenses. It's deeply felt, fully and properly expressed, and perhaps that's enough. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Broken Embraces (2009) Jeffrey Edalatpour Since her star-making turn in Volver, Cruz has evolved into a great actress, whose films the audience longs to return to: she and Almodóvar have created whole and complete worlds. Indeed, Broken Embraces mirrors our own - but brightly. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The White Ribbon (2009) Jeffrey Edalatpour The White Ribbon breathes an unholy life into the generation of children who would grow up to become the obedient soldiers and members of the Nazi party. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Let's Talk About the Rain (2007) Jeffrey Edalatpour The arrival of Agathe Villanova is at the center of the drama in Let it Rain, and the story benefits from giving her more to do in front of the lens. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (2011) Jeffrey Edalatpour Larsson was a natural heir to Mankell's style, but unlike his progenitor's work, both the book and film versions of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo lack Wallander's good heart. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017
Howl (2015) Jeffrey Edalatpour Howl is neither a biopic about the poem's author Allen Ginsberg, nor does it delve into any other poem in his literary oeuvre. These are the first of many missteps that the producers take. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2017