NOW Toronto - Rotten Tomatoes

NOW Toronto

All reviews published on NOW Toronto always count toward the Tomatometer score because it is a Tomato-approved publication.
Rating
Title/Year
Author
1
2/5
The Ratchet & Clank video game series goes for easy brand extension on the big screen, repurposing old parts and plots in a space adventure that shows few signs of creative life.
Posted May 2, 2016
2
4/5
Hit It Hard (2016)
The film's charm comes from the man himself. He's refreshingly candid and humble, refusing to tone down talk about his addictions or blame anyone else for his mistakes.
Posted May 1, 2016
3
3/5
Numan is an awkward sort, diagnosed with Asperger's, who credits wife Gemma with holding things together and being the sparkplug in his life. Their relationship is endearing. The music just gets in the way.
Posted May 1, 2016
4
1/5
Two late-80s icons go head-to-head in Precious Cargo: Die Hard's Bruce Willis and Mark-Paul Gosselaar. If that latter name doesn't, um, ring a bell, think Zack Morris. It's the onscreen match absolutely nobody asked for.
Posted May 1, 2016
5
1/5
Mother's Day (2016)
There's only a token black character in a movie set in Atlanta, where blacks outnumber whites by no small margin - Georgia's film tax credits must be incentive to lure more white people into the city.
Posted May 1, 2016
6
3/5
Keanu (2016)
It's ridiculous, but in a really engaging way.
Posted Apr 29, 2016
7
1/5
Too Late (2016)
The longer Too Late goes on, the less there is to it.
Posted Apr 27, 2016
8
2/5
Viva (2016)
Viva is competently produced and acted, but I've seen this movie a dozen times before. And so have you.
Posted Apr 27, 2016
9
4/5
Green Room (2016)
Genre fans will appreciate the craft and intelligence with which Saulnier's assembled his movie -- when they're not digging their nails into their thighs.
Posted Apr 27, 2016
10
3/5
Sing Street (2016)
If Sing Street confirms that Carney, who made his name as the writer/director of Once and Begin Again, has only one trick as a filmmaker -- the infectious rapture of musical collaboration -- well, it's a pretty great trick.
Posted Apr 22, 2016
11
1/5
Now we should worry that studios will use this movie's probable failure to discourage future female-centric blockbusters. Don't blame the stars, all wonderful in their limited capacity.
Posted Apr 21, 2016
12
3/5
Larry Weinstein's tribute to the saxophone doesn't know when to stop wailing, but there's enough fascinating material here to appeal to the ordinary viewer, not just woodwind aficionados.
Posted Apr 21, 2016
13
4/5
Rossi and his subjects explore that uncomfortable compromise between art and commerce, which, in its own way, can also be something beautiful. Where else would art historians work alongside Wong Kar-wai, Baz Luhrmann and Rihanna?
Posted Apr 21, 2016
14
3/5
Hockney (2016)
t's fine, and Hockney is an engaging screen presence. But it could have been much more than that.
Posted Apr 20, 2016
15
3/5
16
3/5
In its second half, though, Tykwer and Hanks find a tone that works for both of them, and A Hologram For The King becomes an involving, intriguing drama.
Posted Apr 20, 2016
17
3/5
18
2/5
A few moments work very nicely, and Taylor and Scrofano have a zippy chemistry that makes it a pleasure just to watch them sit and talk together. But Sabbagh's script runs out of ideas about an hour in.
Posted Apr 18, 2016
19
3/5
The movie deals tangentially with #BlackLivesMatter but what it's really about is the space: a place where a community can get together to share their anger, pain, faults and joys. That matters too. That's what these movies are.
Posted Apr 15, 2016
20
3/5
Potoni can't trust his own instincts, let alone convince others to trust him with vulnerable kids. Curtis makes you see that internal tension, raising the stakes on what would otherwise be a conventional inspirational drama.
Posted Apr 14, 2016
21
3/5
Tackling the same dehumanizing economy the Dardennes dealt with in Two Days, One Night, director Stéphane Brizé is far more schematic, leaving little room for any emotion -except despair.
Posted Apr 14, 2016
22
1/5
Prisoner X (2015)
The new sci-fi thriller Prisoner X has not learned the lessons of Primer, and that's a shame, because it's treading similar ground. It has a good idea, but no idea how to execute it.
Posted Apr 13, 2016
23
2/5
Miles Ahead (2016)
To quote the man himself, so what?
Posted Apr 13, 2016
24
2/5
Criminal (2016)
The first and third acts are efficient extended chases, but there's an hour in the middle that's just Costner wandering around London grimacing and bleeding from various wounds. Or at least it felt that way.
Posted Apr 13, 2016
25
3/5
Transfixed (2015)
26
2/5
While cartoon panthers, bears and orangutans singing, dancing and fighting is the stuff of pure joy, watching lifelike animals do the same thing isn't nearly as pleasurable.
Posted Apr 13, 2016
27
4/5
Race showed us Stephan James could be a movie star. Across The Line mints him as an actor.
Posted Apr 13, 2016
28
3/5
The Boss (2016)
I kept watching to see what McCarthy was going to do next, and I usually enjoyed whatever it was. In a movie like this, that's really all that matters.
Posted Apr 13, 2016
29
3/5
It's not a failure by any means, but given the power and elegance with which Guzmán usually makes his points, it does seem rather slight.
Posted Apr 6, 2016
30
3/5
Borealis (2015)
The movie's greatest asset is its cast: Chernick and King are very well matched in the leads, and Pollak and Emily Hampshire deliver solid support.
Posted Apr 6, 2016
31
3/5
Francofonia (2016)
32
2/5
33
4/5
Harrington fills the movie with famous fans like Kris Kristofferson, Sheryl Crow and John Prine, among others, but the real power of her film is in its archival performances.
Posted Apr 6, 2016
34
2/5
Takes the obvious jabs at record labels, shows its cards early and spends the rest of the time humming the same tune.
Posted Mar 30, 2016
35
3/5
City Of Gold (2016)
36
1/5
For a movie about limitless potential, Absolutely Anything carries no creative spark of its own.
Posted Mar 30, 2016
37
4/5
38
5/5
Midnight Special's greatest asset is simply Shannon, who undercuts his imposing screen persona with deep veins of vulnerability and fear.
Posted Mar 30, 2016
39
4/5
Structured with a deceptively casual hand, it's charming and smartly observed throughout, and the ensemble cast vanish into their period roles.
Posted Mar 30, 2016
40
3/5
Darling (2016)
It's ultimately too slight to stand out in its chosen sub-genre, but Carter's performance as a woman slowly reduced to one raw nerve will keep you watching all the way through to the end.
Posted Mar 30, 2016
41
1/5
Wow. It's worse than I'd feared.
Posted Mar 24, 2016
42
3/5
It's a hell of a story, but I kept thinking The Clan should land a lot harder than it does.
Posted Mar 23, 2016
43
3/5
44
2/5
45
2/5
The kindness of average mortals is far more comforting than the stuff that involves bright lights. If only the film threw more of its weight behind believing in people.
Posted Mar 17, 2016
46
2/5
It's rambling and unstructured by design, but the self-consciously playful score and the sense of "hey, just shoot whatever" get a little wearying.
Posted Mar 16, 2016
47
2/5
There's no reason this should run almost two hours.
Posted Mar 16, 2016
48
2/5
The films themselves are so bland and monotonous that it's difficult to invest beyond being happy that actors I like are being well-compensated for their work.
Posted Mar 16, 2016
49
1.5
Coconut Hero (2015)
Coconut Hero turns into a film about an oddball kid relieved to find out he has a brain tumour, a new escape hatch from his small Canadian town seemingly populated by Wes Anderson's bastard children.
Posted Mar 16, 2016
50
4/5
I'm not sure Côté has the answers. But he's found a really compelling way to ask the questions.
Posted Mar 16, 2016