Spin

Spin is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Emily Yoshida, Troy Patterson
Rating Title/Year Author
eXistenZ (1999) Regan Oakley In the end, the problem with eXistenZ is the notion that this is a game anybody would want to play. EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000) Chris Ryan This movie's got soul...I'm not mocking it. EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
Princess Mononoke (1997) Sean Cameron The final minutes of Princess Mononoke proves its greatness, with an ending that is enthralling and pleasingly unresolved... EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
The Insider (1999) Chris Ryan This combination of visual flair and a seemless command of the storyline makes The Insider one of the most captivating and rewarding film-going experiences of the year. EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
Mansfield Park (1999) Annie McNamara Unfortunately, the saccharine glaze of Rozema's final product, takes her story off the edge and into a perfect world where consequences are glossed over... EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
X-Men (2000) Andy Greenwald What is most surprising and wonderful about director Bryan Singer's X-Men is how skillfully it avoids all of the myriad potholes placed in its path. EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
American Beauty (1999) Chris Ryan American Beauty is one of the more complicated and rewarding American films of the last few years. EDIT
Posted Oct 11, 2018
Persepolis (2007) Troy Patterson Adapting her memoir into a starkly beautiful animated feature, comics artist Marjane Satrapi braids personal history and national tragedy. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Be Kind Rewind (2008) Troy Patterson Gondry connects the guys' toil and glee with a kind of old-time neighborhood hominess that's dying away and a jazzed creative joy that never will. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
The Killing of John Lennon (2006) Troy Patterson What Killing lacks in celebrity sparkle, it compensates for in raw ambition and rude chills. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
How to Rob a Bank (2007) Troy Patterson Variously reminiscent of a Harold Pinter play, a Tarantino wannabe, and a deranged cell-phone commercial, the legitimately suspenseful How to Rob a Bank has the courage to embrace the ridiculous. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Paranoid Park (2007) Troy Patterson Glum yet gorgeous, Paranoid Park ties together Alex's bleak confusion with his more mundane existential teen traumas. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Snow Angels (2007) Troy Patterson Tragedy is juxtaposed, clumsily, with stories from the so-called life of a high school student, as if the plot had sprained something in the course of its transition from Stewart O'Nan's novel to the screen. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
The Bank Job (2008) Troy Patterson Some great heist films concentrate on the quiet craftsmanship of the big score; and some very good ones, like The Bank Job - wild and willfully shaggy - prefer to revel in the sport of thievery. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Milk (2008) Troy Patterson Gus Van Sant's portrait of San Francisco politician Harvey Milk clunks along as the squarest movie he's ever made, a result of the director investing more emotion in the martyred idol than in the bleeding man. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Boarding Gate (2007) Troy Patterson Combining elements of a D-grade erotic thriller and a deconstructed international thriller, Boarding Gate proves duly snazzy and sleazy - kinda skanky in a highfalutin' way. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
It Might Get Loud (2008) Troy Patterson David Guggenheim's delightfully unsnobby symposium of a documentary convenes three masters who share one love: electric guitar. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
Shutter Island (2010) Troy Patterson Yes, [it's] built on pulp landfill, but purposefully so, with Scorsese using the twist ending to riff on the very power of elaborate fantasy. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
The Runaways (2010) Troy Patterson While the offstage passion between Jett and Currie gives the film its emotional drive, their in-concert erotic aggression is an occasion for elegantly examining the line between self-expression and self-exploitation. EDIT
Posted Sep 5, 2018
The Girl on the Train (2016) Emily Yoshida This iteration is barely more thoughtful than your standard rape-revenge grindhouse fare, and by the end the audience at my screening was cackling like a midnight movie crowd. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2017
Elle (2016) Emily Yoshida As Michele, Huppert contains literal volumes. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2017
Doctor Strange (2016) Emily Yoshida The film is bloated and unfunny... and is plagued by a boringly retrograde notion of pan-Asian-ness while conveniently escaping the burden of casting any actual Asians in its principal roles. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2017
Arrival (2016) Emily Yoshida As I've said, I've seen Arrival three times-for critical and then therapeutic reasons-and it takes to the light differently with each revisit, much like the edgeless ships hovering over the earth's surface. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2017