Vague Visages

Vague Visages is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer® when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Alistair Ryder, Becky Kukla, Bedatri D. Choudhury, Beth McDonough, Devika Girish, Diana Cheng, Ella Kemp, Jacob Oller, Jim Ross, Joey Keogh, Kyle Kizu, Manuel Betancourt, Manuela Lazic, Marshall Shaffer, Matt Cipolla, Natalia Winkelman, Tanner Tafelski
Rating Title/Year Author
Synchronic (2019) Joey Keogh The sequences where Steve takes Synchronic are masterful, which only makes the rest of the movie feel like more of a letdown. EDIT
Posted Jan 22, 2021
() Joey Keogh The pain of losing someone, as well as the general pain of human suffering purely as a result of being alive, is sharply felt in Kidd's film. EDIT
Posted Jan 8, 2021
Climate of the Hunter (2019) Joey Keogh A fitfully dull, purposely confusing head-scratcher that is impressive in its genre-defying nature and commitment to the weirdness of its setup but leaves one feeling as unsatisfied as a vampire who hasn't had a drop of blood to drink in several nights. EDIT
Posted Dec 29, 2020
The Bloodhound (2020) Joey Keogh Even when nothing particularly scary is happening, the sensation that it's about to at any moment is suffocating. Overall, Picard's film is unsettling, tense and incredibly strange. EDIT
Posted Dec 29, 2020
Archenemy (2020) Joey Keogh An interesting misfire for Mortimer, a filmmaker who, above all else, isn't afraid to try something different. EDIT
Posted Dec 29, 2020
Funny Boy (2020) Alistair Ryder It's a strange case of a film that is doing all it can to minimise its cultural specificity to tell a "universal" coming of age story, generalising the historical context to such an extent that the story fails to have any impact. EDIT
Posted Dec 18, 2020
Happiest Season (2020) Joey Keogh Happiest Season isn't the goofy, laugh-a-minute caper much of its marketing material is promoting. It's actually something a lot more interesting; a chewy, spiky, emotionally complex story that's difficult to pin down and equally tough to shake. EDIT
Posted Dec 3, 2020
Sound of Metal (2019) Joey Keogh Watching [Riz] Ahmed flourish without words, typically an actor's lifeline, is a joy. It's a massive challenge and he rises to it with aplomb. EDIT
Posted Dec 3, 2020
Honey Bee (2018) Joey Keogh Rau's film... is more concerned with providing a scuzzy but always well-meaning day-in-the-life look at someone in a horrible situation than providing any easy answers to how she'll get out of it. EDIT
Posted Dec 3, 2020
Minari (2020) Alistair Ryder It's very likely the most distinctively American story of the year, but so richly realised in its study of family and the search for prosperity, it transcends borders in the way only the best cinema can. EDIT
Posted Dec 2, 2020
8/10 The Nest (2020) Colin Biggs "Nothing presented in 'The Nest' will radically alter the viewer's perception of the family unit, marriage or even greed, but Durkin's film suggests that is indeed the point." EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2020
Pieces of a Woman (2020) Alistair Ryder That rare thing: an adaptation of a stage play that cleverly hides the limitations of its source material. EDIT
Posted Nov 17, 2020
Murder Bury Win (2020) Joey Keogh Presents a game that looks genuinely fun and wraps it up in an evocative story about how dreams often only come true at a cost. Beautifully performed, frequently hilarious, and will strike a chord with anyone who's even a little bit creative. EDIT
Posted Oct 23, 2020
The Mortuary Collection (2019) Joey Keogh As anthologies go, this is a remarkably solid entry with zero duds to speak of, which kicks off at a lively clip and ties everything up neatly with the requisite wink for good measure. EDIT
Posted Oct 23, 2020
4/4 Nomadland (2020) Diana Cheng Zhao's style is evocative but accepting. 'Nomadland' is an exquisite gem of filmmaking. EDIT
Posted Sep 28, 2020
You Cannot Kill David Arquette (2020) Joey Keogh Even for those who haven't a clue why someone like Arquette would choose to get in the ring and put himself in unnecessary danger, this is an incredibly moving and life-affirming lesson in following your dreams at all costs. EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
Lucky (2020) Joey Keogh Lucky is a rallying cry for women everywhere to fight back, to keep speaking up, and to go it alone when all else fails. EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
Dinner in America (2020) Joey Keogh There are enough laughs and swoon-worthy moments to mark it out as the best, and weirdest, rom-com in years. ...A must-watch that will hopefully find its audience the same way Simon and Patty found each other. EDIT
Posted Sep 8, 2020
Sputnik (2020) Joey Keogh A remarkably solid debut that functions as both a study of human nature and a frightening indictment of military intervention. EDIT
Posted Aug 21, 2020
7/10 The Rental (2020) Colin Biggs "The ideas present are intriguing, however The Rental's ultimate staying power is questionable." EDIT
Posted Jul 27, 2020
Assassination Nation (2018) Matt Cipolla All the while, aesthetics reveal an infatuation with older movies . . . and revamp its more seminal inspirations into the overstimulation you'd find on a Tumblr gif set. EDIT
Posted Jul 26, 2020
Vox Lux (2018) Matt Cipolla Trauma is the new ennui. That may sound cynical, but Vox Lux is too amoral to be cynical. It's cold and cruel -- maybe even bitter -- but not cynical. EDIT
Posted Jul 25, 2020
Impetigore (2019) Joey Keogh Impetigore employs aspects of the classic ghost story (hallucinations of creepy little girls dressed in white; unfriendly townspeople harboring a horrifying secret) to conjure an unsettling feeling that something very bad is about to happen. EDIT
Posted Jul 24, 2020
Relic (2020) Joey Keogh Relic ...is a sharp study of grief and how women in particular compartmentalize trauma and hurt for the betterment of everyone else. EDIT
Posted Jul 10, 2020
The Beach House (2019) Joey Keogh Brown leaves just enough to the imagination to make his premise completely terrifying but consistently hints at the real-world ramifications to effectively ground it in reality. EDIT
Posted Jul 10, 2020
Tommaso (2019) Frazer MacDonald Tommaso shows Ferrara taking his career in a new direction, and it's nice to see someone of his stature still making innovative, daring films... EDIT
Posted Jun 12, 2020
Vivarium (2020) Joey Keogh To say this is the ideal isolation horror movie for these confusing times would be a vast understatement. EDIT
Posted May 15, 2020
Blood Quantum (2019) Joey Keogh Politically motivated but never preachy, loaded with enough blood, guts, and intestines to satisfy the thirstiest gore-hounds. ...A zombie movie for the ages that honors the grandest traditions of the genre while remaining true to its own unique essence. EDIT
Posted May 15, 2020
The Dazzled (2019) Marshall Shaffer The chief contradiction of communitarianism is on full display in The Dazzled: a group that bonds around a strict set of shared values also repels those who refuse to march in lockstep. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Someone, Somewhere (2019) Marshall Shaffer Klapisch's rejoinder depicts the tragic irony staring down today's young people: the world is at our fingertips, but genuine connection always feels just out of reach. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Sweet Song (2019) Marshall Shaffer The film sneaks up on you, just as the character does to Myriam and Paul. By the time Louise's parasitism emerges, it's too late to stop what's coming. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
On a Magical Night (2019) Marshall Shaffer A film need not make a sweeping proclamation on the issues it circles to show something meaningful. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Deerskin (2019) Marshall Shaffer Dupieux has a way of simultaneously and paradoxically exposing the absurdities of unearned machismo under a microscope while also blowing them out of scale for comic effect. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Through the Night (2020) Marshall Shaffer Through her bottom-up view of the pre-coronavirus economy, Limbal invites viewers to observe and then empathize. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
499 (2020) Marshall Shaffer This does not feel like a thematic conceit with the strength to sustain an entire feature. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Socks on Fire (2020) Marshall Shaffer It's a work full of introspection and empathy, but McGuire never quite cheats out enough to make his film applicable or generalizable. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Pray Away (2020) Marshall Shaffer [Stolakis] efficiently packages and manages each of the major threads in the film, giving viewers an expansive and conclusive look at the topic. EDIT
Posted May 2, 2020
Why Don't You Just Die! (Papa, sdokhni) (2018) Jim Ross ...the central performers handle the range of tones without snapping as abruptly as Matvey's bones. The insane violence and gore won't sit well with everyone, but Sokolov executes Why Don't You Just Die? with a cinematic sensibility and confidence. EDIT
Posted Apr 23, 2020
8/10 Born to Be Blue (2015) Colin Biggs Born to Be Blue doesn't promise to be a 100% true account of Chet Baker's life, but Bruce Budreau and Ethan Hawke create an account that proves essential viewing. EDIT
Posted Apr 22, 2020
10/10 Phantom Thread (2017) Colin Biggs If indeed this is Day-Lewis' swan song, Phantom Thread is the crowning achievement of a monumental career. EDIT
Posted Apr 22, 2020
System Crasher (Systemsprenger) (2019) Jim Ross System Crasher (Systemsprenger) features a tremendous central performance from Helena Zengel, along with superb use of editing and colour. Although the tone is occasionally muddled, the film manages to be both viscerally engrossing and heartbreaking. EDIT
Posted Apr 16, 2020
The Translators (2019) Jim Ross A stylish and sometimes fun mystery story, with some heist elements thrown in for good measure. However, it's so preoccupied with dramatic reveals and building intrigue that it starts to border on the parodic. EDIT
Posted Apr 16, 2020
Son-Mother (2019) Jim Ross Mohammadi's visual storytelling is impeccable, and there is nothing sensationalised about it in the slightest. EDIT
Posted Apr 16, 2020
Who You Think I Am (2019) Alistair Ryder Takes a premise that could easily be adapted as a straight thriller and transforms it into a character drama of considerable empathy, albeit one that never excuses its protagonist. EDIT
Posted Apr 9, 2020
Sea Fever (2019) Joey Keogh Sea Fever recalls Carpenter's The Fog in one key sequence, but otherwise it's essentially The Thing at sea, which is meant as a compliment rather than a dismissal EDIT
Posted Apr 9, 2020
The Lawyer (2020) Alistair Ryder Zabarauskas' film is about how stereotypical signifiers of identity can often overshadow characteristics that speak to a person's true self. But The Lawyer ends up becoming as simplified as what it was setting out to subvert. EDIT
Posted Apr 3, 2020
The Other Lamb (2019) Joey Keogh The Other Lamb is so gorgeously captured and so well performed...it's easy to forgive its shortcomings. The final moments stray into full-bore horror territory, but it's Cassidy's opaque expression that sticks in the brain. EDIT
Posted Apr 3, 2020
The Truth (2019) Alistair Ryder Unlike many other filmmakers who transition between languages for the first time, Kore-eda's style of filmmaking hasn't got lost in translation, but it's an awkward fit for such an inherently melodramatic premise. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2020
I Was at Home, But (2019) Bedatri D. Choudhury I Was at Home, But tests its audience and never tells them if they're right, and therein lies the challenge. The point is not to "get" the film but to have thought about it and come up with a whole array of personal truths. EDIT
Posted Mar 6, 2020
Come to Daddy (2019) Jim Ross Although the film slightly loses its way while accelerating to its conclusion, the splatter of dark comedy and dysfunctional father-son dynamics is always engaging and frequently smart. EDIT
Posted Feb 14, 2020