Vague Visages

Vague Visages is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Becky Kukla, Bedatri D. Choudhury, Beth McDonough, Devika Girish, Diana Cheng, Ella Kemp, Jacob Oller, Joey Keogh, Kyle Kizu, Manuel Betancourt, Manuela Lazic, Marshall Shaffer, Natalia Winkelman, Tanner Tafelski
Rating Title/Year Author
Color Out of Space (2019) Joey Keogh The Lovecraftian material and wonderfully wild Cage performance suit [Stanley's] artistic tendencies but, even so, the filmmaker displays a masterful control of his craft. EDIT
Posted Jan 21, 2020
Atlantics (2019) Annette LePique Atlantics floats between lives, from trauma and death to the power of hope. It's a film that posits what the world could be, what it should be. EDIT
Posted Jan 10, 2020
She's Missing (2019) Joey Keogh More mood piece than cohesive story, it's impressive chiefly in how McGuinness mirrors the desolate bleakness of the protagonists' lives with the parched cinematography of their surrounding landscape. EDIT
Posted Dec 30, 2019
Little Women (2019) Greg Carlson Greta Gerwig continues to exercise her command of cinematic storytelling with Little Women, a perfectly wrapped and beribboned Christmas gift as welcome as a steaming cup of cocoa... EDIT
Posted Dec 23, 2019
Parasite (2019) Greg Carlson Bong effortlessly blends the horrific and the comic en route to the icebox talk that has viewers questioning their own attitudes and beliefs through the unanswered mysteries of the story. EDIT
Posted Nov 26, 2019
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (2019) Greg Carlson Heller even embraces some of the master's own techniques honoring presence, patience and quietude... EDIT
Posted Nov 26, 2019
Doctor Sleep (2019) Greg Carlson That Doctor Sleep doesn't in any way detract from or diminish the 1980 film is a genuine compliment. EDIT
Posted Nov 26, 2019
() Diana Cheng A collaboration between a Chinese-American director and a Korean-American writer, 'Coming Home Again' is an exemplar of minimal styling that shows what is essentially human surpasses the boundary of what is ethnic and cultural. EDIT
Posted Nov 25, 2019
The Lighthouse (2019) Greg Carlson As the story unfolds, Eggers almost effortlessly conveys viewer curiosities about the veil separating the corporeal and the ethereal. EDIT
Posted Nov 7, 2019
Zombieland: Double Tap (2019) Greg Carlson Most curious of all, Zombieland: Double Tap spends more time ignoring the clear and present danger of the undead to focus on the rambling road trip undertaken... EDIT
Posted Nov 4, 2019
Hard to Be a God (2013) Tanner Tafelski Hard to Be a God, to say the least, can be seen as a flexible metaphor for the unchanging state of both Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. EDIT
Posted Oct 30, 2019
My Joy (2010) Tanner Tafelski Necessarily bleak, My Joy shows [Russia] caught in the kind of circuitous violence that ultimately corrupts man. EDIT
Posted Oct 30, 2019
Entangled (2019) Q.V. Hough Divided into weekend segments, Entangled often feels like a tease. But once Lurie fully engages with character history, the film itself similarly feels engaging as well. EDIT
Posted Oct 25, 2019
() Joey Keogh Ham on Rye floats meaninglessly from one scene to the next with no real sense of urgency or anything resembling a plot to force it along. EDIT
Posted Oct 16, 2019
Halloween (2018) Joey Keogh Horror fans can rest easy, while newcomers will be delighted by this nasty new modern take. A triumph. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Hounds of Love (2016) Joey Keogh [Hounds of Love's] more memorable and chilling than any of its gorier counterparts could hope to be. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Thelma (2017) Joey Keogh Thelma is the kind of brooding, emotionally-charged movie that demands your full attention at all times. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Verónica (2017) Joey Keogh [Paco] Plaza's tale of teen possession is powerfully scary. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
A Beautiful Day (2017) Joey Keogh The film is an endurance test at times, but it's breathtakingly shot, capturing the beauty in the grim. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Revenge (2017) Joey Keogh Revenge is not quietly revolutionary. It makes its message quite clear. Loud, brash, neon-colored and shot like a music video, the flick is unabashedly cool. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Set It Up (2018) Joey Keogh As a showcase for two actors who more than deserve their moment to shine, Set It Up is hugely satisfying. As a modern romantic comedy, it's glorious. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Leave No Trace (2018) Joey Keogh Leave No Trace finds its tension in the growing gap between father and daughter as Tom's worldview widens while Will's closes in. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Bodied (2017) Joey Keogh Bodied is a blisteringly urgent and inescapably topical meditation on race, class and identity. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Female Human Animal (2018) Joey Keogh The behind-the-scenes glimpse at the world she inhabits is fascinating but, again, all too fleeting. The thriller elements, meanwhile, are neither fleshed out enough to garner any actual fear, nor left unknown to the point of requiring further reflection. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Peripheral (2018) Joey Keogh Even when too much stuff is being thrown at the screen, it's hard not to admire Peripheral for trying. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
24 Weeks (2016) Joey Keogh 24 Weeks is not an easy watch, though it's compelling throughout. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Le Ciel Flamand (2016) Joey Keogh This could've been a cold study of a difficult life but Monsaert focuses on love instead, and on growth through hardship. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
New Money (2017) Joey Keogh The film is scattershot at times and tonally inconsistent throughout, flirting with elements of a crime thriller and a goofy comedy. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
All the Creatures Were Stirring (2018) Joey Keogh All the Creatures Were Stirring isn't as accomplished as Tales of Halloween... but its shorter run-time and singular vision mean there isn't an obvious dud in the handful of shorts. EDIT
Posted Sep 25, 2019
Always Be My Maybe (2019) Joey Keogh The brainchild of comedian Ali Wong, the film is sharp, fresh, funny and sweetly self-assured. EDIT
Posted Sep 25, 2019
Ad Astra (2019) Greg Carlson Regardless of the extent to which one is smitten with the religious allegory and father-son thematic, Ad Astra looks absolutely gorgeous. EDIT
Posted Sep 23, 2019
The Laundromat (2019) Rhys Handley As it wraps up, the experience of The Laundromat reveals itself to be ultimately hollow. EDIT
Posted Sep 23, 2019
Hustlers (2019) Greg Carlson Shaping the narrative around the complexities of female friendship and the pressures wrought by the financial crisis of 2008, Scafaria convincingly paints a psychologically resonant portrait that allows the viewer a seat on the inside looking out. EDIT
Posted Sep 18, 2019
Ford v Ferrari (2019) Marshall Shaffer It's equal parts visual and sonic spectacle as well as human drama. EDIT
Posted Sep 12, 2019
Knives Out (2019) Marshall Shaffer Once you clue into the fascinating political undercurrent running beneath Knives Out, a whole other film unlocks itself before your eyes. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2019
Waves (2019) Marshall Shaffer Shults has created a film that is its own organic being with eyes, ears and a rapidly beating heart. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2019
Mid90s (2018) Greg Carlson Alongside Hill's careful ear for dialogue, which pinballs from vulgar braggadocio to sincere reflection (Smith nails it in one particularly wise observational exchange), the two-decade nostalgia span is at a perfect remove... EDIT
Posted Aug 8, 2019
Filmworker (2017) Greg Carlson Zierra does manage to achieve something tangible: a well-articulated and wholly compelling argument that no matter how one feels about the auteur, moviemaking is a collaborative art. EDIT
Posted Aug 8, 2019
Zama (2017) Greg Carlson In a series of deliberately staged scenes of ravishing visual and auditory design, Martel observes the folly with calculated detachment. Resisting any and all temptations to explain, the filmmaker speaks through images that explore a series of tensions... EDIT
Posted Aug 5, 2019
The Tale (2018) Greg Carlson The resulting work, which Fox calls "issue-based fiction," resonates as both art and a vehicle for change. EDIT
Posted Aug 5, 2019
Can You Ever Forgive Me? (2018) Greg Carlson Heller and McCarthy take viewers into their confidence, making the case for both the awful, clammy anxieties associated with physical and intellectual property theft/deception and the pride at conjuring convincing intimacies that were valued as real... EDIT
Posted Aug 5, 2019
Bathtubs Over Broadway (2018) Greg Carlson Whisenant emphasizes the ways in which Young's quest have led him to meaningful interpersonal relationships and a sense of avocation that transcend his work as a writer of television comedy. EDIT
Posted Jul 31, 2019
David Crosby: Remember My Name (2019) Greg Carlson The whole film, skews heavily toward an elegiac mournfulness that marvelously erases any and all of the punchlines depicting Crosby as an out-of-control, substance-abusing has-been, replacing them with a more complex portrait... EDIT
Posted Jul 31, 2019
Hail Satan? (2019) Greg Carlson Lane's focus on several of TST's provocative operations takes precedence over any in-depth historical account of Satanism, but the filmmaker does make a little bit of room to consider the so-called Satanic Panic of the 1980s... EDIT
Posted Jul 31, 2019
Native Son (2019) Greg Carlson Johnson's striking vision is enhanced by Libatique's photography, which perfectly outlines the discomfort experienced by Big as he tries - and fails - to fit in anywhere. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019
Us (2019) Greg Carlson Us will make your head spin as you attempt to tell the difference between the heroes and the villains. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019
Little Woods (2018) Greg Carlson DaCosta is flat-out terrific at constructing scene after scene of anxious menace. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019
The Mustang (2019) Greg Carlson [It] effectively composes the particular, wordless poetry that can only be found in the best examples of the American mythology of the equestrian. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019
After (2019) Greg Carlson Jenny Gage's sudsy After offers run-of-the-mill college romance targeted to the PG-13 demographic. The result, a far cry from the lustier stories upon which it is based, misses the mark despite an appealing performance from Josephine Langford. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019
Late Night (2019) Greg Carlson Kaling's effectiveness is certainly open to interpretation, but most jokes and gags land with more confidence than the film's odd depiction of the deficiencies of Newbury and her show...still, there is much to like... EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2019