Silent London

Silent London is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer® when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Pamela Hutchinson
Rating Title/Year Author
The General (1926) Pamela Hutchinson The General is one of the funniest, most ingenious, and gosh-darn exciting films you will ever see in your long and happy life. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Veronika Decides to Die (2009) Pamela Hutchinson I was thoroughly charmed by this film. Von Nagy is gorgeous, of course, but more alive than most ingénues EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
They Shall Not Grow Old (2018) Pamela Hutchinson The soldiers of WWI are here little more than motion-capture figures for Jackson's team to drape with colour and sound and stereoscopy. An army of Gollums: not wearied by age perhaps, but certainly contemned by technology. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Bait (2019) Pamela Hutchinson Bait is a fantastic movie, and will intoxicate anyone who loves the art and craft of film. The pacing stumbles a little towards the end, it's true, but I left the cinema enthralled and full of excitement about the medium. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Arctic (2018) Pamela Hutchinson Arctic is an engrossing movie and sometimes almost unbearably tense film, shot smartly by debut director Joe Penna. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Journey's End (2017) Pamela Hutchinson Dibb's sensitive incorporation of, or tribute to, traces of archive imagery is intriguing and very satisfying. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
My 20th Century (1989) Pamela Hutchinson Enyedi's film has the capacity to make ideas and inventions that are now familiar seem new again, to imbue them with the sense of wonder and magic that they once held. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Wonderstruck (2017) Pamela Hutchinson Haynes is doing something more interesting than reconstruction. His film, carried along by Carter Burwell's brilliantly alive score, creates an almost silent movie -- a wordless communion between two periods of time. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
() Pamela Hutchinson While this film doesn't contain the fluid editing style that Pabst's later silents were noted for, it has plenty of visual panache, some intense performances and a carefully sustained atmosphere of mounting hysteria. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Shiraz: A Romance of India (1928) Pamela Hutchinson This is a film to wallow in. Hat-tip to the illustrious Anglo-German cinematography team of Henry Harris and Emil Schünemann. It takes repeat viewings of Shiraz to satisfy your hunger for those gorgeous landscapes and grand palaces. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Chained (1924) Pamela Hutchinson How could it not be a wonderful film, with Dreyer directing, and two other estimable filmmakers in the cast? EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Stockholm, My Love (2016) Pamela Hutchinson I do appreciate how Cousins's silent camera, how his immersion in an older style of film-making, has created a poignant, provocative new film. Stockholm My Love is a singular and proud City Symphony. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Notfilm (2015) Pamela Hutchinson There's plenty here to expand your understanding of Film. And film, too. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
The Great K & A Train Robbery (1926) Pamela Hutchinson Yes, this film relies on a string of outlandish stunts and one incredible hat. But I have a real fondness for films such as this one that embellish a news story into an action rollercoaster. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
For Heaven's Sake (1926) Pamela Hutchinson Bucketfuls of belly laughs to be had, and I nearly gagged when Lloyd munched on a powder puff soaked in cologne believing it to be a cake baked by his sweetie. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
Beau Geste (1926) Pamela Hutchinson It's ridiculous, but Herbert Brenon has a winning way with the spectacular set pieces that the story demands. And the scenes are always stolen by the supporting cast. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
() Pamela Hutchinson Clair conducts his imagery as if it's music, dividing and combining screens, and cutting with steely precision, to create a symphonic film: elaborate, and beautifully poignant. It's also very, very funny. Froth, but of the very finest kind. EDIT
Posted Apr 21, 2020
The New Enchantment (1924) Pamela Hutchinson There's little sentiment in this story, but there is great style. Even the intertitles glitter... L'Inhumaine is liable to leave you unmoved but agog. EDIT
Posted Apr 1, 2020
Synthetic Sin (1929) Pamela Hutchinson Synthetic Sin is an artifact from a time long gone. That is to say that this film is delightful, glamorous, witty... And they really don't make them like this any more. EDIT
Posted Apr 1, 2020
The First Film (2015) Pamela Hutchinson It's a noble quest, and I applaud Wilkinson for taking it on. EDIT
Posted Mar 30, 2020
The Birth of a Nation (1915) Pamela Hutchinson D.W. Griffith made many other films with old-fashioned, sentimental storylines -- but his best work moves the audience, because it is based on an emotional truth. That emotional truth is missing in this film. EDIT
Posted Mar 27, 2020
The Man With a Movie Camera (1929) Pamela Hutchinson This magnificent movie may be a film studies set text, but it defies attempts at explanation, and in fact, it has a unique way of wriggling out of any category you might try to impose on it. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Love Is All: 100 Years of Love & Courtship (2014) Pamela Hutchinson It's a wisp of a film, maybe, but a wonderful experiment -- a curiously intimate use of public footage, which is bound to trigger your own imagination, and your most cherished memories too. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015) Pamela Hutchinson From its ease with wordless communication to the exuberant pleasure it takes in runaway vehicles and ludicrous chases, there's no doubt that this film is suffused with the spirit of great silent comedy cinema. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Spies (1928) Pamela Hutchinson There's not an ounce of fat on this film -- if it's not sexy, dangerous or illegal, Lang won't allow it on screen. And this makes for breathless, disorienting viewing. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
The Thief of Bagdad (1924) Pamela Hutchinson If you can separate the lazy stereotypes and cliches peddled by this "Arabian Nights fantasy" from your appreciation of the inspired movie-making in front of you, you'll enjoy The Thief of Bagdad for what it is: Hollywood spectacle at its most lavish. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Playtime (1967) Pamela Hutchinson Playtime, [Jacques Tati's] masterpiece, is a work of brow-furrowing complexity in its design and structure, but a model of narrative clarity. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) Pamela Hutchinson Herrmann Warm's legendary Caligari sets don't look like the world outside our front doors, but they evoke the nightmares that invade our minds... Caligari creeps into your blood, via your fingernails. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Passion (1919) Pamela Hutchinson Lubitsch's film has the glamour and sweep of a historical drama as well as the intimacy of a romcom. The sets and costumes are gorgeous, the very best that Ufa's ample resources could provide. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Sidewalk Stories (1989) Pamela Hutchinson It's funny, it's touching, it's very clever and it has a quite remarkable lightness of touch. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Faust (1926) Pamela Hutchinson This is rousing stuff -- and marvellously, the effects in this film, from the "magic carpet ride" to the scenes when Faust first makes his terrible deal with the devil, are up to telling such a bold story. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
I Don't Want to Be a Man (1918) Pamela Hutchinson When it comes to rebellious on-screen teens, Ossi Oswalda's flirtatious, gender-bending minx feels decidedly modern. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
The Phantom of the Opera (1962) Pamela Hutchinson This is high-camp Hollywood hokum to be sure, but hokum dressed up to the nines. And arguably the sheer gorgeousness of the film, as well as Chaney's chill portrayal of the spectre, lend the entire endeavour an unexpected gravitas. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Napoleon (1927) Pamela Hutchinson A magnificent monstrosity, Napoléon offers refined beauty, raw thrills and a thousand and one reasons to adore the cinema. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Nosferatu (1922) Pamela Hutchinson It's remarkable, by contrast with all the films that have appropriated the stair shot, that Murnau's Nosferatu avoids any such shortcuts: turning leafy landscapes into places of horror, playing violence as romance, and romance as violence. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Dr. Mabuse, King of Crime (1922) Pamela Hutchinson This is pulp mystery fiction with a touch of class; Lang takes a few steps in the direction of his Hollywood film noir future with these slick stories of criminal twists, unexpected turns and moral compromises in a bleak urban setting. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Too Much Johnson (1938) Pamela Hutchinson Haphazard, but buoyant, an experiment in pastiching old-fashioned cinematic styles, but with a passion that energises them. Three years before Citizen Kane and here we can see Welles happily at play with his new favourite toy. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
All Is Lost (2013) Pamela Hutchinson It is a rare sound film that has learned the extraordinary power of silents -- and it's really very special indeed. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
The Island (1960) Pamela Hutchinson Director Kaneto Shindô relies on his imagery to craft an engrossing realist drama. This is one of the most sophisticated, and powerful, of modern silent films. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Tabu (1931) Pamela Hutchinson This voiceless melodrama, as exotic and strange as it may seem, will slide right under your skin. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Underground (1929) Pamela Hutchinson The story of Underground may be simple, but its treatment is unexpectedly dark, stylized, and violent EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
A Trip to the Moon (1902) Pamela Hutchinson This is live-action film, but transformed by Méliès's ingenious in-camera editing and those gorgeous paints to be something more like a cartoon. It's gorgeous, it's ludicrous and it's heaps of fun. EDIT
Posted Mar 26, 2020
Siegfried (1924) Pamela Hutchinson The king of all fantasy epics. Burning palaces, bloody fight scenes, dragons, cloaks of invisibility - this beast has it all, and it's breathtakingly beautiful as well. EDIT
Posted Mar 23, 2020
Kriemhild's Revenge (1924) Pamela Hutchinson Suffers from having a less well-structured, eventful plot than the first... Don't despair though: its flaming finale, and Rudolf Klein-Rogge's grotesque Attila, are well worth putting in the hours for. EDIT
Posted Mar 23, 2020
The Manxman (1929) Pamela Hutchinson It is a sharply beautiful film and Anny Ondra's sleepy-eyed romantic fool gives us a great Hitchcock Blonde before icy Grace Kelly was even born. EDIT
Posted Mar 23, 2020
Snow White (2012) Pamela Hutchinson Blancanieves is a strange piece of work, but a precious one, however, so even if it lacks ambition, its integrity and beauty are to be treasured. EDIT
Posted Mar 23, 2020
Hugo (2011) Pamela Hutchinson Hugo has plenty to indulge a silent film aficionado -- or to educate a young film buff. EDIT
Posted Mar 23, 2020
Louis (2010) Pamela Hutchinson The problem with Louis is that it gets distracted from what it does best, and a Chaplin pastiche is no substitute for the real thing. EDIT
Posted Mar 18, 2020
Nail in the Boot (1931) Pamela Hutchinson While the film is always elegantly composed, the kitchen-sink details of slum life, from watered-down milk and sugar sandwiches to empty shelves and broken furniture are everywhere -- "Shoes" is relentlessly unglamorous. EDIT
Posted Mar 18, 2020
The First Born (1928) Pamela Hutchinson The First Born is a wonderfully well directed film, in fact, eliciting a tremendous, anguished central performance from Carroll. EDIT
Posted Mar 18, 2020