REELYDOPE

REELYDOPE is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Malik Adán
Rating Title/Year Author
Wrestle (2018) Malik Adán In its sobering conclusions, Wrestle has us question how much we undervalue poor children's lives, circumstances and education in this country. EDIT
Posted Feb 28, 2019
Honey Boy (2019) Malik Adán Where LaBeouf's deeply personal story provides the framework, Alma Har'el's direction ensures the film has a classic, empathic quality that rises above simple tearjerker status. EDIT
Posted Feb 25, 2019
Native Son (2019) Malik Adán Johnson's debut-buoyed by Parks' interpolation between adaption and rewriting Bigger's life-is a new direction to present story and emotion in their most visceral and affecting forms. EDIT
Posted Feb 20, 2019
Selah and the Spades (2019) Malik Adán Selah and The Spades powerfully gives voice to a form of unlikeable black girlhood, allowing Selah and her peers to be human, even if that means being shitty. EDIT
Posted Feb 19, 2019
The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) Malik Adán What I've seen, and what I'm pretty sure will come to other viewers, is a film whose brightest moments do the unforgiving work of carrying its weakest elements. EDIT
Posted Feb 19, 2019
Sweetheart (2019) Malik Adán Sweetheart is almost akin to traditional sushi; by paring down the monster movie to its best elements, viewers will find the film to be as refreshing as it is momentary. EDIT
Posted Feb 8, 2019
Venom (2018) Malik Adán If nothing else, it's a mostly fun monster movie that proves Tom Hardy can put on any mask and shine through. EDIT
Posted Jan 22, 2019
If Beale Street Could Talk (2018) Malik Adán By refusing to excise Baldwin's vision from the script, Jenkins & co have built a dialogue with an ancestor, proving the resonance of his words in a modern world while affirming the value and future of a black love everlasting, evermore. EDIT
Posted Jan 22, 2019
Manbiki kazoku (2018) Malik Adán If Satoshi Kon's Tokyo Godfathers pursued the 'lost, and then found child' narrative for general heartwarming effect, Shoplifters pivots into darker, more subtle territory. EDIT
Posted Jan 22, 2019