Harper's Magazine

Tomatometer-approved publication
Rating Title/Year Author
Hot Millions (1968) Robert Kotlowitz [A] wonderfully funny movie. EDIT
Posted Aug 11, 2020
Finian's Rainbow (1968) Robert Kotlowitz [Finian's Rainbow] looks as though it has been rehearsed for, say, two months, then photographed in a week's time. EDIT
Posted Aug 11, 2020
Star! (1968) Robert Kotlowitz While Star! betrays everything in its course, it betrays no one more than its own star, Julie Andrews. EDIT
Posted Aug 11, 2020
Dear John (1964) Robert Kotlowitz Much has been made about the erotic nature of the movie, and that is a good thing... for it is very sweet eroticism. EDIT
Posted Aug 11, 2020
The Lion in Winter (1968) Robert Kotlowitz Mr. Goldman's script cannot resist undercutting the subject by trivializing it. EDIT
Posted Aug 10, 2020
The Fixer (1968) Robert Kotlowitz In the face of Frankenheimer's beautiful intentions it is really awful to have to say that The Fixer is a high-minded, monotonous drone. EDIT
Posted Aug 10, 2020
Ice Station Zebra (1968) Robert Kotlowitz Buy some popcorn and see the movie. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
The Brotherhood (1968) Robert Kotlowitz If this story of the Mafia seems near bankruptcy, it's because nearly everything in it is in debt to something else that was done better at another time. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
Candy (1968) Robert Kotlowitz The joke, if it ever really existed, has gone out of Candy in her film embodiment. In its place is a long, dreary vaudeville, six or seven acts' worth. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
The Night They Raided Minsky's (1968) Robert Kotlowitz It seems a shame, for the director William Friedkin apparently wanted something more...but in the end the crassness of the story does him in. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
Ulysses (1967) Robert Kotlowitz Mr. Strick directed Ulysses and shared the screenplay with Fred Haines. I congratulate them both. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
La Guerre Est Finie (1966) Robert Kotlowitz In La Guerre Est Finie, Resnais has caught the wholly bitter taste of life-in-exile and the obsessive quality that often accompanies the pursuit of hopeless causes. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
Persona (1966) Robert Kotlowitz This original and individual work acts upon us in its own way; what is finally impossible to escape are the faces of Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann, agonized objects of Bergman's worship. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
Accident (1967) Robert Kotlowitz In the end, for all the fairly sensational things that have been brought to pass, it is the audience that is left forlorn and lonely, excluded from the often boring private visions of Harold Pinter's characters. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
The Last Tycoon (1976) Stephen Koch The Last Tycoon is a beautiful and interesting failure precisely because it lacks confidence and energy, because it substitutes the uncertain beauties of nostalgia and style for whatever inventiveness was required to fulfill its promise. EDIT
Posted Aug 4, 2020
Closely Watched Trains (1966) Robert Kotlowitz One of the most appealing movies of the year. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) Robert Kotlowitz There is so little authentic feeling in Far From the Madding Crowd. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
Camelot (1967) Robert Kotlowitz This Camelot could be moved into Disneyland, intact. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) Robert Kotlowitz Stanley Kramer's Guess Who's Coming to Dinner is another of his Euclidean problems in human geometry, worked relentlessly through step-by-step to the last tear and the neat solution, both of which are designed to provide full satisfaction. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
War and Peace (1966) Robert Kotlowitz The Tolstoyan directness comes through the film, the attempt stated and restated -- to resolve the dilemma of how to live. And while the movie sometimes hammers its moral points home with something less than grace, its epic quality never fails. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
() Robert Kotlowitz Their story, of course, has been told several times before, under different names, but never, in my memory, at such excruciating length. The film, which might have been satisfactory at an hour and a quarter, goes on for nearly two. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) Robert Kotlowitz This follow-up to The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is the French at their least charming, being a nearly unbearably coy Gallic imitation of an MGM musical dating from the heyday of Gene Kelly. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Robert Kotlowitz The movie, it seems to me, is a kind of galactic deep freeze, empty inside, both extraordinarily tedious and fancy at the same time. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
The Chinese Girl (1967) Robert Kotlowitz Its pace, for all the talk, is exhilarating, its use of primary colors hard and beautiful, its shifts of mood and action are both intricate and dazzling; while its feeling for its characters is always serious and affectionate, even when Godard is mocking. EDIT
Posted Aug 3, 2020
Nighthawk (2019) Ela Bittencourt Mendonça and Dornelles's film is... an attempt to grapple with unspeakable, horrifying evil -- but an evil that must be understood in social and historical rather than biblical terms. EDIT
Posted May 1, 2020
The Other Side of the Wind (2018) J. Hoberman Sure to be wildly overpraised and cursorily dismissed, The Other Side of the Wind is often awful and frequently great, occasionally at the same time. The main thing is that it gives Welles the last word. EDIT
Posted Jan 7, 2019
Phoenix (2014) Daniel Mendelsohn But as Petzold's film slinks toward this metaconclusion, all the artistry - the ingenious allusiveness and the Russian-doll plotting - finally upstages whatever larger point he wanted to make about history and identity, Germans and Jews. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Labyrinth of Lies (2014) Daniel Mendelsohn I couldn't help wishing for less earnestness and more artfulness... But Labyrinth of Lies is too eager to tell the truth and get to its foregone conclusion: the beginning of the trials, and the inevitable title cards that describe their results. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Alexander (2004) Daniel Mendelsohn The film that resulted from this obsessive desire for historical accuracy is a dud: a baggy, incoherent, bloviating mess in which any sense of the thrilling and impressive arc of Alexander's career sinks beneath the weight of period detail. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Paddington (2014) Rivka Galchen Silly and smart and witty and pretty and just feel-good enough that you don't have to feel too bad about feeling good. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
The Boy and the Beast (2015) Rafil Kroll-Zaidi The family dynamics in The Boy and the Beast are more astute and involved than they are in any of Hosoda's other features. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
When Marnie Was There (2014) Rafil Kroll-Zaidi Unlike American animated films, which only gesture at moral seriousness, Marnie and other films like it are centrally, sincerely concerned with the complex trials of adolescence. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
Beasts of No Nation (2015) Nat Segnit The result is a film that is at once diligently dramatic and oddly becalmed, a film about unutterable horror that isn't particularly horrifying. EDIT
Posted Mar 22, 2018
Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (2015) Rivka Galchen Instead we have heroes like Hunt, who fight against transparency and accountability. It's no surprise that the government ends up embracing him all over again. EDIT
Posted Mar 22, 2018
Hail, Caesar! (2016) A.S. Hamrah The Coens' Hollywood is an empire, where fraud is cheerful, natural, invisible - where people can live as they want to, so long as they don't trouble the system that keeps them employed. Everything goes fine there until the Commies show up. EDIT
Posted Mar 14, 2018
Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) A.S. Hamrah The film's political resonances are as mutable - and as muddled - as those of its predecessors. EDIT
Posted Mar 14, 2018
No (2012) J. Hoberman Given the charnel-house atmosphere of Tony Manero and Post Mortem, it's striking that Larraín concludes his Pinochet trilogy on a note of near-giddy optimism. EDIT
Posted Mar 4, 2018
12 Years a Slave (2013) J. Hoberman 12 Years a Slave is, like The Trial, a trapdoor over the abyss. Although less abrupt than Kafka's novel, the movie wastes little time before plunging its viewer into a nightmare of dehumanization. EDIT
Posted Mar 4, 2018