Harper's Magazine

Harper's Magazine is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): A.S. Hamrah, J. Hoberman, Michelle Orange
Rating Title/Year Author
The Other Side of the Wind (2018) J. Hoberman Sure to be wildly overpraised and cursorily dismissed, The Other Side of the Wind is often awful and frequently great, occasionally at the same time. The main thing is that it gives Welles the last word. EDIT
Posted Jan 7, 2019
Phoenix (2014) Daniel Mendelsohn But as Petzold's film slinks toward this metaconclusion, all the artistry - the ingenious allusiveness and the Russian-doll plotting - finally upstages whatever larger point he wanted to make about history and identity, Germans and Jews. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Labyrinth of Lies (2014) Daniel Mendelsohn I couldn't help wishing for less earnestness and more artfulness... But Labyrinth of Lies is too eager to tell the truth and get to its foregone conclusion: the beginning of the trials, and the inevitable title cards that describe their results. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Alexander (2004) Daniel Mendelsohn The film that resulted from this obsessive desire for historical accuracy is a dud: a baggy, incoherent, bloviating mess in which any sense of the thrilling and impressive arc of Alexander's career sinks beneath the weight of period detail. EDIT
Posted Apr 17, 2018
Paddington (2014) Rivka Galchen Silly and smart and witty and pretty and just feel-good enough that you don't have to feel too bad about feeling good. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
The Boy and the Beast (2015) Rafil Kroll-Zaidi The family dynamics in The Boy and the Beast are more astute and involved than they are in any of Hosoda's other features. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
When Marnie Was There (2014) Rafil Kroll-Zaidi Unlike American animated films, which only gesture at moral seriousness, Marnie and other films like it are centrally, sincerely concerned with the complex trials of adolescence. EDIT
Posted Apr 13, 2018
Beasts of No Nation (2015) Nat Segnit The result is a film that is at once diligently dramatic and oddly becalmed, a film about unutterable horror that isn't particularly horrifying. EDIT
Posted Mar 22, 2018
Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (2015) Rivka Galchen Instead we have heroes like Hunt, who fight against transparency and accountability. It's no surprise that the government ends up embracing him all over again. EDIT
Posted Mar 22, 2018
Hail, Caesar! (2016) A.S. Hamrah The Coens' Hollywood is an empire, where fraud is cheerful, natural, invisible - where people can live as they want to, so long as they don't trouble the system that keeps them employed. Everything goes fine there until the Commies show up. EDIT
Posted Mar 14, 2018
Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) A.S. Hamrah The film's political resonances are as mutable - and as muddled - as those of its predecessors. EDIT
Posted Mar 14, 2018
No (2012) J. Hoberman Given the charnel-house atmosphere of Tony Manero and Post Mortem, it's striking that Larraín concludes his Pinochet trilogy on a note of near-giddy optimism. EDIT
Posted Mar 4, 2018
12 Years a Slave (2013) J. Hoberman 12 Years a Slave is, like The Trial, a trapdoor over the abyss. Although less abrupt than Kafka's novel, the movie wastes little time before plunging its viewer into a nightmare of dehumanization. EDIT
Posted Mar 4, 2018