The Sopranos: Season 6, Part II (2007)

SEASON:

Season 6, Part II
The Sopranos

Critics Consensus

America's first crime family bows out in a chilling cut to black during a meditative final season that is debatably cruel to audience expectations but wholly committed to its thematic integrity.

83%

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Critic Ratings: 30

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User Ratings: 0

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Episodes

1
Air date: Apr 8, 2007
2
Air date: Apr 15, 2007
3
Air date: Apr 22, 2007
4
Air date: Apr 29, 2007
5
Air date: May 6, 2007
6
Air date: May 13, 2007
7
Air date: May 20, 2007
8
Air date: Jun 3, 2007
9
Air date: Jun 10, 2007

Tv Season Info

The sixth and final season of The Sopranos begins with Uncle Junior, now senile, shooting Tony who is rendered comatose. This last season has Phil Leotardo deciding that it's time to get rid of the Soprano crew, and we follow his movements as he moves in for the ultimate kill. Stars James Gandolfini, Lorraine Bracco, Edie Falco and Michael Imperioli.

Critic Reviews for The Sopranos Season 6, Part II

All Critics (30) | Top Critics (17)

It's still a master-class in building tension. David Chase mines more suspense out of a family talking at a diner as a young woman struggles to parallel park than most pure horror directors could even dream.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

Any explanation... no matter how smart or well-reasoned, misses the point. To explain it would diminish it.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Rather than an ending that would stop the conversation about Tony Soprano, Chase gave us an ending that will keep us talking.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

Somehow, though, it feels like the perfect final note. Why wouldn't a show that's taken such pleasure in rewriting the rules of storytelling go out in the least conventional way possible?

Jun 19, 2018 | Full Review…

Think of it as complete at last, a perfect whole. It's finished but it's not over. Life goes on.

Jun 19, 2018 | Full Review…

Its final season mostly crackled, with the usual superior performances and writing from actors James Gandolfini and Edie Falco, and creator David Chase... For now it's curtains on an extraordinary achievement.

Jun 19, 2018 | Full Review…
Top Critic

The Sopranos is written with psychological depth and made with creative freedom. The result is personal, but not impenetrable or surly. [Full review in Spanish]

Sep 21, 2018 | Full Review…

To me, it felt like an hourlong f--- you from a guy who has seen fan devotion for The Sopranos transform him from a little-known but well respected TV producer into one of the most legendary TV auteurs in history.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

It's not TV, as HBO often reminded us. No, it was something on a much grander scale.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

There is some evidence to support the notion that Chase punk'd fans with mad, self-congratulatory glee... But I admire his zeal in defying expectation.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

The Sopranos came up with an ending just as murky and disorienting as the 85 hours that led up to it. Rather than betray its ethos by bowing to convention, The Sopranos went out on its own terms.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

Who knows? We'll never know. And it's better that way. If you're thinking there's a movie in the works, think again. It was supposed to end like this.

Jun 20, 2018 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Sopranos: Season 6, Part II

  • Jan 15, 2019
    The best TV show ever. I do not think we will ever see anything like it again.
  • Nov 09, 2018
    Amazing show that I finally got around to watching over the past 4 months. Season 6 wraps up most of the story lines. This show will go down as an all time great and one of the main shows that helped launch this Golden age of Television that we are living in right now!
  • Jul 29, 2018
    mY REVIEW FOR THE ENTIRE SERIEs After years of searching for that one television series that could bring the medium into the realm of art, in 1999, when David Chase's "The Sopranos" made its debut on HBO --- TV had finally found its "Citizen Kane". Sure there had been several great series before "The Sopranos", and there has been many since, but like "Citizen Kane" in its medium of film, every great show when compared to "The Sopranos" seems a little less great. "A mobster in therapy, having problems with his mother," was how "The Sopranos" initially sparked, according to creator David Chase. The plan, originally was for this story to be made into a feature film, but Chase decided to change his plan, and turn the story into a series. An idea that had to seem risky in the days before HBO became a prominent cable network where TV writers did not have to concern themselves with withholding swear words and nudity. The pilot script was turned down by several major television networks before being accepted by HBO, and the Pilot episode aired on January 10, 1999. It was clear from the beginning that the series was going to be a success amongst both critics and audiences. The New York Times stated, "[The Sopranos] just may be the greatest work of American pop culture of the last quarter century." In 2007, Roger Holland of "PopMatters" wrote, "the debut season of The Sopranos remains the crowning achievement of American television." The average audience number for season 1 was 3.46 million --- an average that became as high 10.99 million for season 4. The controversial series finale brought in a total number of 11.90 million viewers. And became probably the most discussed series finale since "M*A*S*H" ended its run on February 28, 1983. The series begins when capo, and eventual boss of a New Jersey based crime family, Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) starts seeing a psychotherapist, Dr. Melfi played by Lorraine Bracco, after he begins having panic attacks. The two's relationship is more hostile than that of most doctors and their patients. Tony acts out in rage toward Melfi, becomes sexually attracted to her, and threatens to leave her therapy behind several times, before she realizes toward the end of season 6 (The final season), that she, in part, may be contributing to his criminal ways, and decides to drop him. The psychological aspect of the show is what makes it stand out from other movies or TV shows we've seen made about the mafia in the past. Tony often has vivid, some times prophetic dreams, that are as close to actual dreams as any I've seen portrayed before in any medium. And many of his actions are a result of a psychological issue he's dealing with at the time. Tony is married and has two children. Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco) is no saint. She's a typical mafia wife, who is so in love with the luxuries, and benefits that go along with this criminal lifestyle, that she blatantly ignores, and for the most part, overlooks his constant sexual affairs with countless women, except at the end of season 4 when she becomes fed up with Tony's infidelity when learning he had sex with a one-legged Russian woman, and the two are separated for most of season 5, before getting back together near the end of that season, when she decides to go back to overlooking his cheating. Tony's children are the sources of much of his stress during the series. His daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) starts out as a rebellious teenager who is constantly at odds with her parents. During the later seasons, she settles into more of less dramatic character, whom, like most whose family is apart of the mafia, begins to accept it, as well as ignore it. Tony's son, A.J. is up and down throughout the series to say the least. He starts out as a quiet, overweight kid, who likes playing video games, and seems rather content most of the time. Over the years, he not only drops the baby fat, but also drops the contentment. He begins having panic attacks, and in later seasons, he suffers from extreme psychological issues, which result in depression, an attempted suicide, and he is eventually committed to a home for the mentally ill. Tony's other family --- his crime family consists mainly of a handful of guys: There's his consigliere, and owner of strip club "Bada Bing", Silvio Dante (Steven Van Zandt); Long time wisguy, Paulie Gualtieri (Tony Sirico); "Big Pussy" (Vincent Pastore), a veteran gangster who runs an automotive body shop; and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), a drug addict, and aspiring screenwriter, whose character brought the show some of its better scenes and storylines --- including when his long time girlfriend, Adriana, is ordered dead by Tony after Chris tells him that she has been working as an informant for the FBI. The murder scene, and build up to it, is so cold, that it gives me chills just thinking about it. Two other prominent influences in Tony's life are is uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), and mother Olivia (Nancy Marchand). Junior is the boss of the family for the majority of season 1, and tries to have his nephew, Tony, killed during the season --- a murder plot his mother was also somewhat involved in. Junior goes from a tough as nails mob-boss, to a pathetic, lonely old man, who begins suffering from dementia in later seasons. Tony's mother is a miserable old woman, who not only almost has her son killed, but is blamed by both Tony and Dr. Melfi for his many psychological issues, due to her extreme behavior during Tony's childhood, which involved constant shouting, and at times, making Tony feel fear for his life. But the series never puts the full blame for who Tony is on his upbringing. Chase makes it clear that Tony had his choices, and chose to follow the path of darkness. And he eventually reaps what he sowed for himself. The the thing that impresses me the most about this remarkable series is what Chase is able to make the audience feel. It takes a special kind of storyteller to make an audience feel legitimate sadness for people who are essentially evil. We understand that these awful individuals get what they deserve for the most part, but it saddens us, because Chase makes sure to show us that each and every one of them had potential to live happy, successful, important lives, free from the constant misery and death that go along with this lifestyle. The overall point that creator David Chase seemed to be making with this series, was that while what others do to you, and what you witness from others in your childhood certainly have an affect on who you become as a person, at the end of the day, we all have choices --- and we have to deal with the potential consequences of those choices. We may not always make our beds, but it's always our decision whether or to lie in them. Much has been made of "The Sopranos" finale where the screen turns black, leaving some to wonder 'what happened?' Some were outraged, and question what it meant. But if you watch closely enough, it could not be more clear. And I for one think it was an absolutely brilliant way to end this series.
  • Jan 16, 2018
    Entertaining show but way too over the top. Theres always something going on. Like as if these guys never even get to relax lol. At all. Kinda like sons of anarchy just too much
  • Feb 22, 2017
    A roller-coaster unlike any other, the up is so entertaining, and the down is so agonizingly torturous and equally fun.
  • Jan 23, 2016
    The most beautiful end of every time
  • Dec 19, 2015
    The greatest ever TV drama series. The life and times of Tony Soprano, New Jersey mob boss. Shows his, er, "business" dealings, his family life and everything in between. A monumentally brilliant and influential drama series. There had been crime dramas before, but this transcended that by making the criminals human. We see their personal relationships, anxieties, ups and downs, joys and pains. This is not a crime drama, its a drama, with criminals the main characters. Intelligent, fast-moving plot, snappy, often funny, dialogue and good action scenes. This has it all. This series created the blueprint for future TV dramas and put HBO on the map.
  • Nov 30, 2015
    I remember it pretty clear. There was nothing on TV one night a long time ago and I was flipping through the channels looking for something and I just happened to land on The Sopranos on HBO. Just seemed to be at the right place at the right time. Sure, eventually I probably would have heard about the show through word of mouth and started watching it, but I find it funny that a random stop on HBO would end up turning out to be my favorite television show ever, without question. To me honestly nothing even comes close to The Sopranos for my money. Yeah, I love Breaking Bad and The Wire, but they are a distant second and third favorites to The Sopranos. The writing, the storylines, the characters, the authenticity and of course the amazing acting of everyone involved makes the Sopranos not just a TV masterpiece but an entertainment masterpiece. I fully believe most movies don't even compare to The Sopranos for pure entertainment value. Most mafia shows glorify the gangster lifestyle, not really showing what these guys are truly about. Scorsese touched on what scum they are in goodfellas, but still there was a sense of "its cool to be a mobster" in that movie. The Sopranos turns all that on its head. Getting to the core of these men involved in crime. Men that would kill their own mother for a few extra dollars. There is nothing glorious about the Sopranos. It is real and in your face. Does Tony Soprano love his family? Yes. Does Tony Soprano care about the people close to him? Yes. Is Tony Soprano a sociopathic murderer ? Oh yes, yes he is. Through this journey of The Sopranos we follow and grow close to each of these characters, no matter how big or small of a role they have. The best part about the Sopranos though, is that as serious of a drama the show is, its also a comedy in a lot of aspects. Dark humor of course, but funny nonetheless. I know you are probably thinking, "6 seasons, ehhhh, that is a lot to catch up on" Trust me, even if it takes you forever to finish, which it wont, you will not be disappointed.
  • Nov 24, 2015
    The Sopranos creators decided to split the last season into two parts. After a semi-odd first part of the season, I was not sure what to expect from the greatest TV show of all time, and how they would end things. I was not let down. You can pretty much choose any Sopranos season and say it is the best one, but Season 6 part 2 is a truly dark season. No spoilers here, but some of the things that come to a head in the final episodes are so well done. "The Blue Comet" episode in my opinion is the best episode of television I have ever watched. The tension between Tony's family and the New York family headed by Phil Leotardo is mounting through every episode. James Gandolfini and crew deliver yet again great emmy worthy performances.
  • Jul 14, 2015
    THE BEST SHOW EVER!!!! This is the show that slapped all other t.v. shows in the face! And so deserved too! James Gandolfini's performance as Tony Soprano is iconic! So iconic! It's so iconic, it gives the word iconic a whole new meaning! Gandolfini is the king of the t.v. network, enough said. edie Falco, who I believe is a fox as Carmela Soprano. She is so hot and such a convincing Italian mob wife that she deserves all the credit that comes her way. Plus, I believe she is severely underrated as an actress, and even though I have yet to see Nurse Jackie, I can just tell by the famous fight scene between Carmela and Tony when Tony's former Russian mistress call's Tony's house to tell Carmela that she use to have sex with her husband and Edie Falco literally rips him a new one when Gandolfini returns home. It really show the range of her acting capability, and I always say when you get an actress who is hot and can act well, that's all you need. Plus Tony Sirico, who plays Paulie, is my guy. He always makes the whole show for me, even if he just sitting outside Satrielle's getting his normal tan, whacking some landscaper over the head with a shovel, Paulie is my man!

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