The This Old House Hour: Season 3 (2004 - 2005)


Season 3
The This Old House Hour

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Episodes

Air date: Oct 7, 2004

The project: an 1849 Greek Revival-style farmhouse in Carlisle, Mass. It needs plenty of work, but as carpenter Norm Abram puts it: "If we can't save this house, who will?" In addition, Abram and host Kevin O'Connor tour the house in the Dorchester section of Boston that was renovated in the show's first year. Also, landscape contractor Roger Cook has garden-edging advice for new homeowners in suburban Beverly, Mass. Also: segments on drill bits and fire extinguishers.

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Air date: Oct 14, 2004

"This Old House" buys a Carlisle, Mass., farmhouse and hires an architect to design the renovations. Host Kevin O'Connor and carpenter Norm Abram check with local authorities and a real-estate agent before work begins. On "Ask This Old House," plumbing-heating expert Richard Trethewey replaces a bathroom-sink trap and contractor Tom Silva covers a cracked plaster ceiling with drywall. Also: landscaper Roger Cook discusses design options for a brick walkway.

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Air date: Oct 21, 2004

Work begins on the Carlisle, Mass., farmhouse with a barn-raising (sort of)--- workers jack up the barn so its foundation can be repaired. But first, landscaper Roger Cook clears land for jobsite parking and architect Jeremiah Eck displays a 3-D model of his design. On "Ask This Old House," Cook mends fences (literally) outside the "This Old House" barn, plumbing-heating expert Richard Trethewey fixes an anti-scald mixing valve on a shower and contractor Tom Silva upgrades an old drill by installing a "keyless" chuck.

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Air date: Oct 28, 2004

Before work on the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead can begin in earnest, a ledge blocking its new basement must be removed and the septic system brought up to code. Meanwhile, carpenter Norm Abram examines the stone foundation under the jacked-up barn; and host Kevin O'Connor travels to Vermont to visit the Barn People, a group of craftspeople that restores old barns. On "Ask This Old House," projects include pass-through for a kitchen wall and a toilet that won't stop running. Also: "What Is It?"

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Air date: Nov 4, 2004

Work on the new foundation for the 1849 Carlisle, Mass., farmstead is the focus as contractor Tom Silva fashions a crushed-stone foundation footing and carpenter Norm Abram oversees the installation of the foundation itself, a precast unit. Meanwhile, arborist Matt Foti and landscaper Roger Cook discuss how to move the septic tank without harming a catalpa tree; and host Kevin O'Connor visits Carlisle's Brook Farm State Park, a working dairy farm. On "Ask This Old House," projects include removing bolts and screws with stripped or damaged heads; making an edge for a concrete walkway using large cobblestones; and jacking up a porch roof to repair a rotting post.

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Air date: Nov 11, 2004

Major structural work is performed on the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead project: 40-foot beams to support the barn deck are installed, as are I-joist floor panels and a SIPS wall system. But arborist Matt Foti has bad news about two trees on the property, and that's not the only bad news. On "Ask This Old House," projects include a window box and backyard resodding. Also: "What Is It?"

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Air date: Nov 18, 2004

An old cannonball, perhaps from the War of 1812, has been found on the grounds of the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead, where framing work progresses on the Greek Revival house and the new connecting ell. Meanwhile, two carpentry students join the team as apprentices, and host Kevin O'Connor visits Yale University's Building Project, where graduate architecture students "learn by doing." On "Ask This Old House," plumbing-heating expert Richard Trethewey replaces a hot-water heater's sacrificial anode rod and helps a homeowner cool off by installing thermostatic valves on her steam radiators, while contractor Tom Silva installs a "cricket," or rain diverter, to draw water away from another homeowner's front steps.

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Air date: Nov 25, 2004

Landscaping plans for the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead are reviewed with landscape architect Stephanie Hubbard, while plumbing-heating expert Richard Trethewey installs a septic tank and carpenter Norm Abram discusses windows with architect Jeremiah Eck. Meanwhile, host Kevin O'Connor checks out the windows in a house in Park City, Utah. On "Ask This Old House," contractor Tom Silva installs adjustable shelves in a homeowner's den and Trethewey installs a hot water recirculator pump in the upstairs bathroom of another.

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Air date: Dec 2, 2004

Landscaping is under way and 100 windows arrive at the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead, but there's a hitch in progress on the wall that's to surround it: the fieldstone must be returned because it lacks "character," says stone-wall expert Nick O'Hara. Inside, host Kevin O'Connor, carpenter Norm Abram and designer Kathy Marshall plan the kitchen. On "Ask This Old House," projects include fixing leaky valves and a leaky drip-irrigation hose, and replacing a rusty cellar door with a fiberglass one.

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Air date: Dec 9, 2004

Work on the "living hall" in the Carlisle, Mass., farmstead's barn is progressing. Meanwhile, entomologist Ron Schwalb treats old timbers for insects and mold; host Kevin O'Connor, carpenter Norm Abram and contractor Tom Silva raise ceilings in children's bedrooms; plumbing-heating expert Richard Trethewey and well contractor Dave Hayes check the flow and capacity of the existing well.

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