hypathio7's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years
9 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

When you have the resources of Ron Howard and the producers working on this doc you can insert interviews with famous Beatles fans and access astounding archival footage from news sources, concerts, in depth interviews with John and George before they died, and more candid material. Focusing on the BUSY touring years from 1963 to '66 when the boys from Liverpool were getting along, this film is loaded with their great music and reveals their personalities, which those of us who didn't live during that time probably only have a vague understanding of. The digital remastering of the songs is stellar and the taped concert footage is crisp, clear, and well synched. Their cheeky jokes with the press put a smile on my face and I learned that the Fab Four refused to perform at Southern stadiums and concert venues that had segregated seating. They forced change through their popularity here in America by only agreeing to give a concert if blacks and whites in the audience were free to sit wherever they chose. Like doing the work of eight days in a seven day week this documentary packs so many details about a short three year period into its two hour and seventeen minute runtime. I recommend you watch it on Hulu.

Broadway Idiot
9 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

The biggest revelation is that Billie Joe Armstrong was not always a punk, but a theater kid singing show tunes in family home movies. This doc explores a little of what was going through Green Day's head when they originally made the American Idiot album released in 2004. Naturally, this doc focuses on translating that album to the Broadway stage. The theater production team is shown working on a story to tie the music together, the arrangements, the choreography, and the stage design, then Green Day is brought in to grant their approval. Eventually Billie Joe decides he wants in on the action. He joins the Broadway cast for a short time as his alter ego St. Jimmy, a character that he says is his dark side. A hard rocking behind-the-scenes streaming flick.

The Love Parade
9 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Ernst Lubitsch's first talkie, Jeanette MacDonald's first screen appearance, and the first of many time these two would make movies with Maurice Chevalier. Lubitsch with his cinematographer managed to keep the camera moving through the grand set, which was something that most early talkie/musicals could not deliver. This film is a joyful romantic comedy. The battle of the sexes will still make you chuckle. The added comic relief, well not relief but zingers, of butler Jacques (Lupino Lane) and maid Lulu (Lillian Roth) were highly enjoyable. MacDonald is a regal, spoiled Queen. Chevalier is a scampish, charming Count (the model for the skunk Pepe Le Pew). There are grumpy cabinet members arguing over policy in the fictional country of Sylvania. Of course their main concern is finding the Queen a husband to subdue her moods and demands. And the Count loves the challenge of seducing the Queen. At first he is content with the gender reversal as he lounges around the palace while his wife goes to work making big decisions, but then like the cabinet members he turns quite sexist in insisting that she let him take more control. With impeccable comic timing and lilting melodies this famous screen couple leads the viewer through a love parade.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (Les Parapluies de Cherbourg)
9 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

This French La Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) musical was made at Jacques Demy's peak. It is brightly colored and mostly takes place in the '50s. French superstar Catherine Deneuve is Geneviève and the title is the name of the umbrella shop owned by her mother played by Anne Vernon. It is a story of young lovers who are star-crossed because they come from different classes, but a richer man also loves the girl. When she ends up pregnant and her working class lover, Guy (Nino Castelnuovo), gets drafted to fight for a solid two years, will she settle for the other man, Roland (Marc Michel), who can give her and her son a comfortable life? It is divided into four acts as time passes for Geneviève. The music is not the type from Hollywood musicals and it is not adapted from a stage production. There are no musical hooks or refrains repeated, nor big production numbers. There are instrumental themes for certain characters or emotions, but the lyrics are more free-form meaning the characters sing what they would traditionally speak without much rhyming or structured verses. The film is a bit sad and certainly fits the cinematic modernism of the Left Bank New Wave.