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The Man from Planet X
34 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Science fiction and horror are not what they once were. They are focused so much on quantity than quality. The amount of special effects and over the top violence to be exact. That is something about which audiences did not have to be concerned during Hollywood's golden era. Classic science fiction and horror - including even the cheesiest flicks such as It Came From Outer Space, The Invisible Boy, and The Man From Planet X among so many others - stand head and shoulders above today's largely forgettable flicks because they focused more on quality than quantity. Thanks to the work of the people at Shout! Factory, the latter of that trio recently received new life through a new Blu-ray re-issue this past July. That re-issue gave the movie its own new life while also helping to show why classic sci-fi and horror is just as good as its modern counterparts, if not better. That is due in part to the movie's familiar yet still entertaining story, which will be discussed shortly. The movie's production values (I.E. sets, special effects, etc.) also play into its enjoyment and will be discussed later. The bonus audio commentary tracks included in the movie's re-issue round out its most important elements. Each element is important in its own way in showing why this movie is so enjoyable. All things considered, they prove clearly that this movie is in fact one more example of why classic sci-fi and horror is just as good as its modern counterparts if not better than them.

Scream! Factory's recent Blu-ray re-issue of MGM and United Artists' 1951 sci-fi/horror flick The Man From Planet X is a fun watch for any classic sci-fi and horror fan that proves clearly why movies of its ilk and era are just as good as their descendants if not better. That is proven in part through the movie's simple story. The story centers on an alien from another planet that lands on a small fog-filled Scottish island in order to start an invasion of Earth. In order to start paving the way for that invasion, the unnamed alien puts the tiny village's residents under its control by taking over their minds. It's not the only time that Hollywood presented a story involving a villain using mind control for a nefarious purpose, but it is one of the earlier films to take this route. Interestingly enough, even when under the alien's mind control, the villagers are still cognizant of their surroundings - enough so that they can give the movie's protagonist, John Lawrence, the information he needs to stop the alien. Obviously in the end, Lawrence is able to stop the alien. How he does that won't be given away here. The truly surprising aspect of the whole story is that the alien is not the only villain. Dr. Mears is also a villain, yet manages through his own greed, is the one who unwittingly uncovers the alien's plot. It is definitely an interesting twist, and one that makes the movie that much more entertaining. Keeping all of this in mind, the movie's story does plenty to make the movie entertaining, and is not the movie's only key element. Its production values play into its entertainment value, too.

The production values at the center of The Man From Planet X are collectively speaking just as important to the movie's presentation as its story. Those values include the movie's sets, special effects and even collective editing and cinematography. There are those out there who have lamented the movie's production values, but the simplicity of the movie's production values are a big part of its interest, but those behind the lens used the resources that they had at the time. They are even discussed in the movie's bonus audio commentaries. Those commentaries will be discussed shortly. The simplicity in the sets is in fact part of what makes the movie's look so endearing. They show that a movie (whether sci-fi, horror or both) doesn't always need over the top effects, etc. in order to have a great look. In fact they show that sometimes, a minimalist can have more impact than the overblown approach taken by so many of today's sci/fi and horror blockbusters. The same applies to the movie's cinematography and editing. The angles and cuts are simple in their own right, using the simple sets to their fullest for just as much impact. The combination of that expert editing, cinematography and set design makes suspension of disbelief even easier for audiences, and in turn, insures even more audiences' maintained entertainment and engagement. When this is considered along with the impact of the movie's story, the whole of those elements strengthens the movie's presentation even more. They are not the movie's only key elements. The movie's bonus audio commentaries round out its most important elements.

As was noted previously, one of the items noted in the bonus commentaries included in The Man From Planet X's home release is that of its budget. Author Tom Weaver, who provides one of the two full-length audio commentaries, notes that the movie's budget was low. He does so in a respectful manner, though. He explains that the movie did not have a major budget, yet still managed to make the most of the budget. His discussion on this topic is just one of the items that makes the bonus commentaries so engaging. Weaver also notes early on in his commentary that this movie is both sci-fi and horror because of elements such as the "mad scientist" (Professor Elliot) in his castle and of course the evil, mind-controlling alien. Another interesting item that he notes is that of when he first saw the movie in the 1980s and became a fan of the movie from then on. That he openly admitted not having seen it until almost 40 years after its debut, but still became a fan, shows its impact, despite being a b-flick.

Weaver's is not the only commentary included as a bonus for the movie. Glenn Erikson, who sometimes writes for Turner Classic Movies, sits down for an interview with Arianne Ulmer, daughter of the movie's famed director Edgar Ulmer as an additional commentary. Audiences learn through the younger Ulmer's interview that he was concerned about his legacy being forgotten and about her father's favorite films. The Man From Planet X apparently was one that her dad liked, but apparently was not one of his "favorites." Early on, there is also discussion on her own efforts to preserve her father's works. That dedication to keeping her father's legacy and memory alive is a touching sentiment. If not for her efforts, audiences in fact might not have this re-issue today. Keeping that (and all of the other discussions) in mind, such commentary proves fully important to this presentation. the same can be said of the movie's other bonus commentary. When this is considered along with the importance of the movie's simple yet engaging and entertaining story and its equally laudable production values, the whole of those elements makes this presentation in whole full proof of why there is still a place and need for classic sci-fi and horror in today's market.

Scream! Factory's recent Blu-ray re-issue of MGM and United Artists' classic sci-fi horror flick The Man From Planet X is a work that shows clearly and fully that there is both a place and need for classic science fiction in today's movie industry. It shows that the classics are just as good as their counterparts, if not better, in many cases. In the matter of this rarity, that is shown through the movie's story, which insures entertainment and engagement through its simplicity. Its production values, which are simple in their own right, join with that simple story to strengthen the movie's presentation even more. Both of the in-depth feature-length audio commentaries included as bonus material to the movie, adds even more to its presentation. When all of these noted elements are joined together, they make the whole of The Man From Planet X a movie that easily rivals its modern counterparts and will entertain sci-fi and horror fans of all ages. It is available now in stores and online to prove that argument to everyone. More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:

Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory

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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales
56 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

More than 14 years ago, Disney brought to audiences what was one of the company's biggest and best movies of its rich, decades-long history when it released Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl. That nearly two-and-a-half-hour movie, based on a ride at one of the company's theme parks, proved to be its own enjoyable and successful action packed cinematic ride. In the years since its July 9, 2003 theatrical debut, the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise has become less enjoyable with each entry. It fell so far from the glory of that first movie that when it was originally announced that Disney would make the franchise's fifth film, Dead Men Tell No Tales, much speculation was raised along with plenty of eyebrows. Every bit of that speculation was justified considering the problems with the franchise's second through fourth installments. The reality of the franchise's latest (and hopefully last) installment is that it proves to be a surprisingly enjoyable addition to the series. that is due in part to its story, which will be discussed shortly. The movie's stylistic approach is just as important to note in examining this movie as the story itself. It will be discussed later. The work of the movie's cast puts the finishing touch on its presentation. Each element is important in its own right to the movie's overall presentation. All things considered, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales proves itself a treasure in its own right even with its problems.

Pirates of the Caribbean : Dead Men Tell No Tales is a treasure of a movie, looking at the overall picture of the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise. That is because in comparison to the franchise's second through fourth installments, its story brings the franchise full circle while also wrapping up the loose ends created over the course of the series' previous entries. That includes its very first offering. This time out, Jack Sparrow has to evade yet another high seas villain who he wronged years ago all while trying to locate yet another powerful treasure. All the while, young Henry Turner (Brenton Thwaites - Maleficent, Oculus, Gods of Egypt) is trying to lift the curse on his dad, Will Turner, much as Will tried in previous movies to lift his dad's curse. Henry ends up meeting his own love interest Carina (Kaya Scoldelario - Moon, The Maze Runner 1 - 2) very much in the same fashion in which Will and Elizabeth met in the franchise's first movie). The twist that the writers put on Carina's back story is a positive because it doesn't just outright repeat Will and Elizabeth's love story, but gives it new life so to speak. Henry trying since his childhood to lift his father's curse is just one of the loose ends that this movie's writers wrap up this time out. It is directly connected to the reunion of Will and Elizabeth, which is also addressed in this story, in turn bringing the entire franchise full circle. What is truly interesting to note in those attempts to tie the franchise together, the writers even acknowledge, albeit briefly, the events of Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides. That very brief mention of that movie is actually a good thing considering how...well...strange it was.Considering all of this, the story at the center of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales forms a relatively solid foundation for the movie's presentation.

Relatively is emphasized because there are some issues with the story that cannot be ignored. First and foremost is the fact that in the original trilogy, it was hinted that anyone who controlled Davy Jones controlled the seas. Yet in this story, anyone who wields Poseidon's trident also controls the seas. It's kind of misleading to have two separate ways to control the seas. Also of note is the number of scenes that likely could have been cut without harming the movie's overall story. There was a handful of scenes throughout the two-hour, nine-minute movie that could have been cut, not only cutting down the movie's run time, but also keeping the movie's pacing from slowing at those points, too. The dual presentations of Salazar's back story not once but twice is a prime example of material that could have been cut back. It would have made more sense to tell how Jack lured Salazar into the Devil's Triangle when he was initially introduced rather than introducing him initially and then later telling his back story. Some of the early interactions between Carina and Henry could have been trimmed back, too. Given, two hours and nine minutes is not a bad run time for this installment of the POTC series, but the material that could have been axed made the movie feel almost two and a half hours, which became the series' standard run time. Cutting the noted material would have easily cut the movie back to about two hours flat, but considering as quickly as the story already manages to progress, it would have progressed that much faster without losing anything along the way. Keeping that in mind, the movie's story is not perfect, obviously, but it also is quite an improvement over the stories at the center of the series' previous entries. To that end, this story forms, again, a relatively solid foundation for its presentation. It is not the movie's only key element. The movie's stylistic approach is just as important to note as its story.

The stylistic approach taken in this movie is so critical to note because it takes audiences back to the very first Pirates of the Caribbean movie. The action is there throughout along with the comedic timing, prat falls and more that made Pirates of the Caribbean so surprisingly enjoyable in its first outing. The over-the-top drama of the franchise's second and third films were largely absent this time out, too, making this stylistic return to form quite welcome. Jack's unlikely re-introduction and the early island fight sequence between Jack, his crew and the British soldiers are prime examples of what makes the movie's return to form so welcome. The big high seas battle scenes between Salazar's ship and crew and those of Sparrow also show how this movie stylistically returned to the franchise's roots. There are also the liens traded between Jack and Henry as well as other dialogue that returns to form just as much. Between the lines and scenes noted here and so many others not noted directly, viewers will find that the movie's creative forces went to great lengths to stylistically take viewers back to POTC's roots in a new setting and story. Those efforts paid off greatly here, strengthening even more the movie's overall presentation. When those efforts are coupled with the work of the movie's cast, the movie's presentation proves even more why it is worth the watch.

Johnny Depp and company entertain audiences throughout the course of POTC 5 with their performances. That includes funny moments such as Jack and Henry's first meeting and even Barbosa's men as they discuss Salazar's escape from the Devil's Triangle with Barbosa as well as so many other moments. What audiences will note in these interactions is that even these moments are themselves another stylistic return to form for the movie. The same can be said of the more emotional moments between Henry and Carina. Audiences familiar with the series' history will agree very similar chops were shown between Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley in the original trilogy. Thwaites and Scodalerio are just as impressive as the pair's characters slowly fall for each other. Rather than just go over the top, the growth is gradual, keeping audiences fully engaged. That subtlety in the pair's acting shows experience beyond its years, and shows the promise for each actor's future. Even Geoffrey Rush deserves his own applause as he has to keep himself from being run through by Salazar. He shows a side of Barbosa that rarely had to be seen in any of the franchise's previous entries, and did so professionally, too. It made those moments just as interesting as any other from himself and his fellow cast mates. Those moments in question, when joined with the moments noted here, make even clearer why the cast's work in front of the cameras just as important to the movie's presentation as its story and its stylistic approach. Speaking of those elements, when they are joined with the cast's work, the whole of the noted elements keeps Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales afloat much more easily than its predecessors, and makes it honestly the series' best entry since Curse of the Black Pearl. keeping that in mind, Dead Men Tell No Tales sees Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean franchise sail off in style, putting a positive final note to an otherwise doomed franchise.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is a positive final statement for Disney's otherwise sunken high-seas series. It takes audiences back to the glory of the franchise's first film both in terms of the cast's acting and the movie's stylistic approach. While the movie's story does have at least one plot hole - which is more powerful, controlling Davy Jones or Poseidon's trident? - and suffers from some minor pacing issues related to unnecessary scenes, it still is a fun story that easily allows audiences to suspend their disbelief. Each item noted here plays its own part into the movie's overall presentation. Good and bad considered side by side, this movie sees thankfully, Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean franchise sail off in style, putting a much-needed positive final note to the otherwise maligned franchise. It is available now in stores and online. More information on this and other titles from Walt Disney Studios is available online now at:

Website: http://www.waltdisneystudios.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/WaltDisneyStudios

Twitter: http://twitter.com/DisneyStudios

To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and "Like" it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil's Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.

Cars 3
Cars 3 (2017)
56 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Cars 3, the latest entry in Disney/Pixar's high-octane Cars franchise, was one of the most hotly anticipated movies of this year ahead of its nationwide theatrical debut this past June. That is because of just how disappointing the franchise's second installment - released in 2011 - proved to be. That movie, which was essentially just an acting vehicle for Larry The Cable Guy, was little more than a cash grab for Disney and Pixar. While Cars 3 did make up for the wreck that was Cars 2, it didn't do so without some issues. That is not to say that Cars 3 is unwatchable. As a matter of fact, one of the elements that makes it worth at least one watch is its story. At the same time, the story is also the movie's primary negative. It will be discussed shortly. While the movie's story makes up two of its most important elements, divided into two sides, it is only one of the movie's most important elements. The work of the movie's cast rounds out its most important elements. Both elements are critical to the movie's overall presentation in their own fashion. All things considered, Cars 3 still manages to make it to the checkered flag, albeit on seven cylinders. Yes, that awful pun was intended. That aside, Cars 3 does go the mile and in turn proves itself worth at least one watch.

Cars 3 is a fitting finale for Disney/Pixar's Cars franchise. It is not a perfect period to the franchise, but is still an enjoyable presentation that is worth at least one watch. That is due in part to the movie's central story, which brings the franchise full circle. Eleven years after Lightning McQueen first debuted, he has become a beloved veteran of the Piston Cup Series in this movie - beloved both by fans and by his fellow race cars. However, he also finds that his heyday has passed and must come to terms with moving on and moving forward. If this sounds familiar, it should. A very similar story was presented approximately seven years ago in Toy Story 3, another Disney/Pixar flick. The movies' writing teams are not the same, but the story is quite similar, just presented in a different scenario. It is also a story that, much like that of the franchise's freshman entry, reminds audiences of racing's roots. While Thomasville Speedway does not exist in the real world, it instantly conjures thoughts of North Wilkesboro and so many of the tracks that formed NASCAR's foundation. It was nice to see the movie's writing staff bring back this focus on the sport's past (including its moonshining connection) once again, especially considering the direction that NASCAR has gone since the early 2000s under its current leadership regime.

Paying tribute once more to NASCAR's roots while also presenting a message of letting go and moving forward are both key to making the story Cars 3's central story entertaining. They are only a portion of what makes it watchable. Not to give away too much for those who perhaps haven't yet seen this movie, but there is also a surprise twist in the movie's final scene that is just as certain to entertain audiences while still tying directly into that theme of progress. It makes the story that much stronger. Keeping all of this in mind, the movie's central story forms a strong foundation for its presentation. While that foundation is strong though, it is not entirely solid. There are some noticeable cracks in that foundation thanks to the writing team's apparent struggle to decide if they wanted to throw back to Cars or make this movie more a tribute to the voice of Doc Hudson, the late great Paul Newman.

Throughout the course of Cars 3's one-hour, 42-minute run time, the story references Doc Hudson so many times that it becomes easy to lose count of said references, even going so far as to use what must have been some material that never made it to Cars' final cut in this case to try to advance the story. The problem here is that rather than advance the story, it leads the story to get sidetracked, ultimately slowing the story's pacing. That pacing problem is in the end, the second of the movie's most important elements to discuss. It almost makes one want to fast forward the movie at times as Lightning McQueen progresses on his journey of re-discovery just to make it through the movie's traffic. Yes, that bad pun was intentional, too. Getting back on the subject at hand, the diversions created through the references to Hudson include extra scenes, such as Lightning's discussion with Smokey about Doc and his recollections of his own conversations with Doc among others. Those extra scenes probably should have hit the cutting room floor as they do not do much to advance the movie's central story. Considering all of this, it becomes clear why Cars 3's central story is both a positive and a negative. That duality is so important that it in itself gives audiences plenty of reason to watch this sequel at least once. Also making Cars 3 worth at least one watch is the work of its voice cast.

Owen Wilson returns once more as the voice of Lightning McQueen for this ride as do the original voice actors who brought life to Radiator Springs' residents and even Dinoco owner Tex's voice (Humpy Wheeler), that of Chick Hicks - Bob Peterson (Cars, Up, Finding Nemo) - and Lightning's hauler Mack - John Ratzenberger (Cars, Cars 2, Toy Story 1 - 3). Both the seasoned cast and the new additions - Armie Hammer as the voice of Jackson Storm, Chris Cooper as the voice of Smokey, Cristela Alonzo as the voice of Cruz Ramirez and Kerry Washington as the voice of Natalie Certain - do their utmost to make the movie enjoyable for audiences of all ages. While Jackson Storm is the movie's main villain, he is not really on camera very much. Keeping that in mind, Hammer (The Lone Ranger, The Social Network, The Man From U.N.C.L.E.) easily could have hammed it up as the self-centered, high-performance race car. He didn't allow that to happen, though. Instead he showed his understanding and respect for his part in the story's bigger picture each time, making Storm a villain that audiences will love to hate. To that end, Hammer is deserving of his share of applause for his work. Alonzo (Mind of Mencia, Cristela) is just as entertaining as Cruz. This includes both Cruz's funnier moments - such as when she accidentally digs herself into the sand and when she is acting as the racers' trainer - and her more emotional moments -such as her confrontation with McQueen following the demolition derby and the equally moving climax in the story's final act (not to give away too much). Considering the situations into which the movie's writers put Cruz, it would have been easy for Alonzo to go over the top, too. But She shows time and again so much talent, ensuring even more audiences entertainment and engagement. When her work and that of Wilson couples with work of the movie's supporting cast (the Radiator Springs cast, announcers, etc.) the whole of their work strengthens the foundation formed by the movie's story, and makes the movie that much more worth the watch. That is even considering the issues raised in the story's balance. When this is considered along with the movie's standout CGI, which has clearly been stepped up since the franchise first debuted 11 years ago, the whole of Cars 3 proves to be a surprisingly enjoyable watch. It doesn't live up to the legacy left by Cars, but definitely does make up for Cars 2 while potentially even leaving the door open for a whole new series of Cars movies, leaving it a fitting finale for the Cars franchise.

The third and likely last entry in Disney/Pixar's Cars franchise is a fitting final lap for the series. It proves in the long run that it really should have been Cars 2 instead of the movie that turned out to be Cars 2. That movie never should have even existed. Even with that movie having been made, Cars 3 will likely be considered the real rightful Cars 2 by most viewers. That is due in part to a story that despite struggling to balance its tribute to Paul Newman with an actual continuation of Cars, still proves to have some heart - enough heart to make it worth at least the occasional watch. The work of the movie's voice cast - both main and support - strengthens the movie's presentation even more. Add in some impressive CGI work that that clearly is another step up from the franchise's freshman film, and audiences get a movie that definitely makes it to the checkered flag. It is available now in stores and online. More information on Cars 3 and other Disney/Pixar movies is available online now at:

Website: http://www.pixar.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DisneyPixar

Twitter: http://twitter.com/DisneyPixar

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Trespass
Trespass (1992)
2 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

The holiday season is officially upon us once again, and that means very soon TV networks and theaters alike will be inundated with their respective annual holiday fare. Of course that fare, both new and old alike, is not for everyone. Keeping this in mind, Shout! Factory has an interesting alternative for those looking to avoid that standard fare in the form of the recently re-issued 1992 action flicked Trespass. Originally released in theaters nationwide on Christmas Day 1992, Shout! Factory re-issued the largely forgotten flick on Blu-ray June 27 of this year. The fast-paced ensemble flick features famed actors/rappers Ice-T and Ice Cube alongside then up-and-coming actors William Sadler (The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, Iron Man 3) and Bill Paxton (Titanic, Apollo 13, Aliens) as its leads. Trespass is not the most memorable action flick out there, but that is due in part to its original release date, which is discussed in the movie's bonus material - the re-issue's foundation. That material will be discussed shortly. The movie's story is also discussed in its bonus material, and will be discussed in regards to its importance to its whole later. The cast's acting rounds out the movie's most important elements. When it is joined with the other noted elements, the whole of those elements makes this largely forgotten action flick one worth at least one watch among action aficionados.

Universal Pictures' 1992 action flick Trespass is an interesting presentation for those looking for an alternative to the standard holiday fare on television and in theaters. Having debuted in theaters nationwide on Christmas Day 1992, the 101-minute (1-hour 41-minute) movie is not one of the 90s most well-known action flicks. It debuted at #7 and pulled in just over $5 million in ticket sales nationwide in its opening weekend, eventually reaching sales of $13.2 million before moving from theaters to home video. That is according to boxofficemojo.com. Thanks to Shout! Factory though, it now is getting the chance that it never truly got back in 1992, and the bonus material included in its recent re-issue forms the proverbial foundation for its presentation in its second life.

As Bob Gale, one of the movie's two writers (the other writer was Robert Zemeckis, of Back to the Future fame), noted in the re-issue's bonus material, the movie's original Christmas Day 1992 release date was one of a number of obstacles that the movie faced in its original theatrical release. Also against the movie was the fact that Gale and Zemeckis had to change the movie's title not once but twice before it even went into production. Gale notes in his discussion that the movie's original title was The Looters, and eventually was changed to just Looters before the riots from the Rodney King verdict forced its title to change simply to Trespass out of concern of how audiences would potentially connect the two. Ironically enough, the title actually works considering the story's title. That story will be discussed later. As if the already noted items were not enough obstacles, Gale also notes in his discussion that his agent was concerned about possible race relation issues that he found in the script, darkening the movie's hopes even more. Considering all of these factors discussed by Gale, it is clear that the deck was stacked against Trespass right from the get-go. This vivid revelation shows why Trespass needed, if not deserved, its second life from Shout! Factory. It also serves to show the importance of bonus material included in the movie's Blu-ray re-issue. Much the same can also be said of the separate interviews with Sadler and the movie's producer Neil Canton, which present their own insight into the script's roots and its production.

Keeping this in mind, it is wholly clear why the bonus material included in Trespass' recent re-issue is so critical to its presentation. It is only one of the elements proving why action flick fans looking to escape the annual holiday TV and movie fare will want to give this re-issue a chance. The movie's story is just as important to its overall presentation as the bonus material included in its recent Blu-ray re-issue.

Trespass' story is relatively simple: Two firefighters discover a map to an allegedly hidden treasure in a building that the pair had only recently tried to save from a fire. When they go back to the building to search for said treasure, they unwittingly witness a gang crime that they otherwise would not have seen had they not been there. When the pair is caught by the gang, action ensues that ultimately leads to things somewhat coming full circle by the story's end. There are no underlying subplots or any other elements here to distract audiences and cause the story to get bogged down in itself. It's a straight-forward early 90's shoot-'em-up action story that is sure to appeal to the most devout action flick aficionados, even those likely not so familiar with the story or the movie which influenced it, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre - another item discussed in the movie's bonus material - since it doesn't require audiences to do a lot of thinking, opting instead for just entertainment, which is what action flicks are supposed to do.

Considering this simplicity and the draw that it was certain to have had, it's easy to see why the movie likely would have had at least a fighting *no pun intended* chance in its original release had it been given perhaps an early spring or early fall release in its original release. Again, at least it will have that chance with its re-issue. Even as important as it is, it still is not the last of the most important of the movie's elements. The work of the movie's cast rounds out its most important elements.

Considering that the movie's lead cast - all four previously noted actors - was still very young when it starred in Trespass, its collective work is important to note in examining the movie. That is because of how surprisingly entertaining the cast proved to be in whole. Ice Cube and Ice T showed through their performances their natural on-screen talent - talent that has since proven itself time and again for both men. One moment that proves this comes late in the movie as Savon (Ice Cube) and King James (Ice-T) go toe to toe against one another over the treasure and what to do about Vince (Paxton) and Don (Sadler). That moment of conflict shows just how much tension had been underlying between the men even before the events of the story happened. It would have been so easy for both actors to go over the top, but instead, both men showed such control that they ensured just as much here as in any other moment, viewers' engagement and entertainment. Much the same can be said of Paxton and Sadler as tensions eventually grow between their characters, too. Audiences will be kept fully engaged as Vince and Don start to clash over their search and related safety or lack thereof. The pairs' growing conflicts generates a certain ambiguity over whether the story even has a real villain or hero. Were Don and Vince the heroes or villains? Were the gangsters Savon and King James the villains or good guys? That ambiguity, and its ability to create so much discussion is a tribute to each actor's work. It shows once more the importance of their work to the movie's presentation. When that expert work is joined with the movie's simple story and the in-depth bonus material included in the movie's recent Blu-ray re-issue, the whole of these elements makes Trespass a movie that proves well-deserving of its second life. It also proves it to be a former holiday movie in itself that deserves at least one watch by those looking today for an alternative to the current standard holiday fare.

Universal Pictures' 1992 holiday action flick Trespass is one of the famed studios' least known and least appreciated offerings. It is a movie that, thanks to its recent re-issue via Shout! Factory, proves to be worth at least one watch by those looking for an alternative to the current standard holiday fare. This is proven in part through the extensive interviews that make up the re-issue's bonus material. Those collective interviews form the re-issue's foundation. The movie's simple story strengthens its presentation even more, proving again why it is deserving of that chance. The collective work presented by the movie's cast shows in its own way why the movie deserves its new chance, too. Each element is important in its own way, as has been noted here. All things considered, Trespass proves to be a former holiday release that is deserving of at least one watch by those looking for an alternative to today's current holiday fare. It is available now in stores and online, and can be ordered direct via Shout! Factory's online store. More information on this and other titles from Shout! Factory is available online now at:







Website: http://www.shoutfactory.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shoutfactoryofficial

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ShoutFactory







To keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news, go online to http://www.facebook.com/philspicks and "Like" it. Fans can always keep up with the latest sports and entertainment reviews and news in the Phil's Picks blog at https://philspicks.wordpress.com.