Jordan Satmary's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

Lovesong
Lovesong (2017)
17 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes

I saw a screening of "Lovesong" at Sundance.

When someone sees a film at the biggest film festival in the world, there are involuntary expectations that the film should be something extraordinary.

During the screening, this film made me uncomfortable, disappointed, and even angry. The main characters were so unlikable and uninteresting that I couldn't find any moments of enjoyment. Their dialogue was about as complex as a patch of dirt, and their delivery didn't help. Nearly everything about the film felt as amateur as could be. The end of the film was much better than the dreadful beginning. Some interesting characters emerged and some more advanced forms of comedy were introduced.

It wasn't until hours after that I started to think that the film could've been purposefully horrible. I couldn't fathom that a female director could make such shallow female characters. The film reminded me heavily of "The Comedy".

"The Comedy" is about an unlikable man, or boy if you will, that embraces his "hipster" lifestyle and anti-everything attitude even into his late 30's/early 40's. The movie wasn't enjoyable to a large portion of its viewers. I loved it, but I can understand why. It made fun of a huge population "hipsters" very subtly, masking it's insults inside of unlikable characters. "Lovesong" is appearing to do the same thing, except the joke is on unintelligent women and loneliness that turns into lesbian relationships.

"Lovesong" may be the worst worst film, or the best worst film. It just depends on if this film is a legitimate drama, or one of the best played jokes since "The Comedy".

Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World
17 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

I was lucky to see this at Sundance with one of the best audiences.

Somehow, even after Werner's extensive resume, this was his most immersive and informative documentary yet.

The film doesn't just touch on the basic history and fundamentals of the Internet, but provides such a deep understanding of its past, present, and future. It dives into the wonders of what is possible while carefully reminding us about its dangers, all while Werner gives a very comedic voice-over.

It's a shame that Roger Ebert isn't around to view this film. I know he would've been proud of his friend for creating such an accomplishment in documentary filmmaking.

Viva
Viva (2016)
17 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes

At the screening, the director, Paddy gave an introduction about his personal experience with seeing a drag performance years ago where an individual was having the best time of their lives. He said that those who knew the performer were crying due to the fact that that was the only place this individual could truly be who they were.

That introduction set the mood for the movie. I'm afraid if I wasn't lucky enough to have the director give some backstory I would've liked it less.

The beginning of the film had a few clichés. A troubled protagonist unsure of how to make money, family issues, shopping in record stores. As it went on the clichés dwindled, immersing the audience in Cuba. Our main character's routine continued, and I found myself falling more into his psyche. His family issues became more relevant, his troubles were mine, and even the records had an important role in the story.

By the end people around me were weeping.

The only note I had was that there were a handful of times where moments should've been longer. Just an extra few seconds on those emotional scenes would've gone a long way. Not sure if that's a directing or editing critique.

I'm afraid of using an incorrect term here, so forgive me if I do. But as LGBT rights continue to finally be as important as they should've been decades ago, it's great to see more films like this, especially when they are well done. I hope this film gets the recognition it deserves.

Jim: The James Foley Story
17 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

The emotional depth of this documentary is vast, impressive, immersive. In "Jim", James Foley is beautifully dissected as one of the most honest and kind-hearted conflict journalists of any time.

I find it hard to review this film because of how powerful the entire experience was. I teared up half a dozen times, I couldn't find many words to say to my friends afterwards and neither could they. The documentary seemed to have taken control of us. But the moment that topped off the experience was after the Sundance screening, the director, James Foley's parents, and the young French journalist that was in captivity with James came out for a Q&A. The entire 500 seat audience gave a standing ovation, many in tears.

I'm not sure how else to explain it without giving anything away. It was hard to stomach some of the more graphic and real images from inside Syria. Overall it was an incredible viewing experience, one that needs to be shared with as many people as possible. Especially in 2016 when ISIS appears to be a real threat.