katie with the helmet's Movie Ratings - Rotten Tomatoes

Movie Ratings and Reviews

Riff-Raff
Riff-Raff(1936)
½

[img]http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/4587/harlowtracy1am.jpg[/img]

Jean Harlow is always remembered as one of the most glamorous stars of all time. But I find she's always at her most beautiful when her glamor is downplayed, like in this film, [i]Riffraff[/i], in which she plays a poor cannery worker. Yes, even in that awful dark-blonde wig, Harlow was never more beautiful than she was in her housedresses.

Harlow plays a cannery worker who has long been in love with fisherman Spencer Tracy, who ignores her feelings. The two are antagonistic toward each other, while Harlow gold-digs with the boss. But soon, their pushiness toward each other becomes love, and they get married. But Tracy wants to be a big shot, and his pride and stubborness get him kicked out of the union. He doesn't want to be with Harlow if he can't be important, so he leaves her, without knowing she's pregnant.

Spencer Tracy tended to play regular Joes (this role is very similar to his very favorite of mine, [i]Man's Castle[/i]), but Harlow usually played glamor girls, so it was a really nice surprise to see she fit in quite nicely in the world of unions and labor disputes. She and Tracy have remarkable chemistry (see also [i]Libeled Lady[/i]). Their arguments are realistic, as are their love scenes. Tracy is really good as the angry, stubborn fisherman, and Harlow is equally great as his tough, but sweethearted wife.

The romance and the core story of labor disputes are well balanced. One never overtakes the other, and they're blended together seamlessly. I always find slice of life films about the Depression interesting, and this one particularly, because it didn't make a huge deal that it was the depression, so it felt a little more like I'm just watching someone's life during the time.

And the last scene between Tracy and Harlow is one of the sweetest things I've ever seen in my life.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A

Portrait of Jennie

[img]http://www.vintagegrace.com/musings/musings_graphics/2005/011005/jennie_2.jpg[/img]

David O. Selznick was an obsessive control freak who usually ended up hurting more projects than he helped. But he deserves a lot of credit for taking on interesting and daring material that most producers at that time never would have touched. [i]Portrait of Jennie[/i] is one of those pictures, a unique and complicated romance that turned out to be the best picture Selznick ever produced, despite the problems he had on set.

It's Depression-era New York, and Joseph Cotten is a struggling artist. Despite support from two sympathetic art dealers, he hasn't found the one passion he needs to make him great. One day, he meets Jennifer Jones in the park where she's building a snow man. She's ten years old and very strange, talking about things that happened long before she could have been born. Cotten thinks she's just a funny kid, but something about her stays with him and he sketches her portrait, and its one of the best thing's he's ever done. From then on, he continues to meet Jones, but everytime he sees her, she's aged unnaturally.

It's the most beautiful love story I've ever seen. Love transcending not just death, but time also, to find the one person you're meant to love is just the most purely beautiful story I've heard. And it's filmed beautifully. The film becomes a bit misty whenever Jennie is around, and the scene at the lighthouse filmed all in green is great. It's score is great, and adds to the feeling. The bulk of the score is adapted Debussey works, which have an almost otherworldly feel to them already, reworked slightly to sound a little moreso.

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten share a really intense, unique chemistry. Their relationship in the beginning, when she's just a kid is light and fun. As she grows older, it becomes romantic, and I think it's fascinating that they were able to portray such drastically different types of chemistry, while making their relationship seem like one that's progressing over years with just a few scenes.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A+

Pennies From Heaven
½

Okay, here we are again. I have more time on my hands right now than I have in the past few months, so let's see if I can keep up with my journal. Here's my first review in a good long while.

[img]http://www.satchmo.net/images/pennies/bing-2.jpg[/img]

[i]Pennies from Heaven[/i] is one of the earliest independent films. Bing Crosby and some of his friends wanted to make a movie with minimal studio interference, so the independently produced this little picture, and then sold the distribution rights to Columbia.

Larry (Crosby) is a drifter who, while in prison, is asked by Hart, a man on death row, to deliver a letter to the family of the man he killed. When Larry gets out, he tracks down the family, which consists of a little girl, Pastsy (Edith Fellows) and her kind hearted but poor grandfather (Donald Meek). He takes an immeadiate liking to the family, but they're being pested by social worker Susan Sprague (Madge Evans), who is trying to keep Patsy out of the orphange. In the letter, Hart leaves Patsy and her grandfather his old house, which has a reputation of being haunted. They decide they can cash in on the rumors to keep Patsy out of the orphange by opening a Haunted House Cafe.

The film is very vute, lighthearted fun. Crosby sings a number of memorable songs (particularly the title song), and the musical aspect of the film never feels silly or overtakes the real story. The romance, however, feels quite forced. Evans and Crosby are both quite good in their roles, but they don't have much chemistry. The show really belongs to Edith Fellows. She gives one of the best child performances ever. She's cute, funny, and heartbreaking.

[b]Grade:[/b] B+

The Set-Up
The Set-Up(1949)
½

[img]http://wesclark.com/ubn/set_up_taking_beatings.jpg[/img]

Robert Wise's [i]The Set-Up[/i] was an odd film for 1949. It was an emotion-driven film noir with no score, and told pretty much in real time. It was a hit in Europe, but not so much in America. Today, it's one of the finest and most unique films of noir sub-genre.

Robert Ryan is an aging boxer who's still holding on hope that he can reach the top spot. His wife, Audrey Totter, is a little more realistic, and wants her husband to be her husband instead of a human punching bag. Ryan is getting ready to fight a young newcomer. He's been set-up by his manager to take a fall, but his manager hasn't told him.

[i]The Set-Up[/i] is filmed brilliantly. Most of it takes place in the ring, with a few scenes of Totter walking around town, trying to decide whether or not to go to the fight, cutting in. There is no score, making the film feel even more tense. The doom seems more impending with the lack of music to comfort us. It has the best boxing scenes I've ever seen. They're brutal and difficult to watch at times. Even more difficult than a pretty horrifying scene at the end after Ryan welches on the deal he didn't know existed.

Ryan and Totter give soft, emotional performances, almost completely without words. It's just amazing to watch them act almost entirely through looks. Anyone who thinks all acting from the classic era was hammy and loud needs to watch this film.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A

Born to Kill
Born to Kill(1947)
½

[img]http://www.filmmonthly.com/Noir/Articles/BornToKill/elishacook.gif[/img]

I've often wondered why Claire Trevor wasn't a bigger film noir star. While watching [i]Born to Kill[/i], I think I came up with an answer. For every great noir she made ([i]Murder, My Sweet[/i]) she made a thoroughly mediocre noir, and [i]Born to Kill[/i] is one of those.

Claire Trevor is a divorcee finishing up business in Reno when she stumbles upon the bodies of Lawrence Tierney's murder victims. Instead of calling the police, she simply leaves Reno a little earlier than planned, and meets up with Tierney on the way to San Fransisco. They start up an affair, which seems to keep going on despite his marriage to her rich sister, and her engagement.

The atmosphere of the film is very good. Most of the action takes place in a huge house, and director Robert Wise established the place as a sort of prison very well. The film is tense, but it falls apart with its character and their motivations.

Trevor see-saws back and forth between hating Tierney and loving, between giving him up to the police and protecting him. And for seemingly no reason other than that she might be a little crazy. Tierney walks around the house brooding. No real relationship is ever established between him and his wife, or even between him and Trevor for that matter.

Everyone gives decent, film-noir type performances. They're good, but not good enough to save the film from its indecision and muddledness. The whole time you're just sitting there wondering what the characters are planning and what their motivations are. And we never find out.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]C+

The Miracle of Morgan's Creek

[img]http://www.sensesofcinema.com/images/directors/04/32/miracle.jpg[/img]

Preston Sturges is probably my favorite comedy writer. I've never been disappointed in one of his films. [i]The Lady Eve[/i], [i]Sullivan's Travels[/i], [i]The Palm Beach Story[/i], and [i]Remember the Night[/i] all rank among my favorite comedies and my favorite romances. Out of all of his movies, [i]The Miracle of Morgan's Creek [/i]is probably his weakest, but it sure says a lot that his weakest film is a comedy classic.

Betty Hutton is invited to a party for the boys going away to war, but her father doesn't want her to go. She gets poor sap Eddie Bracken to take her out to the movies, only to ditch him for the party. She gets so drunk that she can't remember anything the next morning, including getting married and concieving a baby. Unsure of who the father is, she tries to get Bracken to marry her, but once she realizes he loves her and she loves him, she can't trick him. She tells him the truth and together they try to find a way to make the situation work.

Sturges really assembled a perfect cast. Hutton and Bracken had done film together before, and we probably each other's best costar. They had great chemistry, and it always nice to see the nerdy guy get the girl. William Demarest is always a joy to watch. He combined perfect line delivery with brilliant physical comedy. He probably provided the most laughs in the entire film. Diana Lynn is a joy to watch as Hutton's precocious little sister.

Sturges was really the best choice to direct his scripts. He combined that hilarious and physical comedy with a perfect comedic rhythm. (The fact that Sturgess didn't direct [i]Remember the Night[/i] is probably why it works better as a romance than a comedy). The script is great, and pretty racy for its time. It's fun to watch how Sturges was able to skirt around the Production Code, following it to the letter, but not the spirit.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A-

The Magnificent Ambersons

[img]http://alumni.imsa.edu/%7Emitch/titles/ambersons3.jpg[/img]

This truly is Welles' most personal film, despite the fact that it was cut to bits by the studio, mostly because Welles suspected the character of George was based on himself. I would be glorious to see Welles' intended vision of the film. Unfortunately, that footage no longer exists. Still, what we are left with is a beautiful and tragic look at the downfall of a family.

Young and handsome Eugene (Joseph Cotten) wants to marry Isabel Amberson (Dolores Costello), but she marries Wilbur Minafer. But since she doesn't love him, all her love goes to their son George (Tim Holt), who, as a result, turns into a brat. After Wilber dies, Eugene begins to court Isabel for marriage again, and this time she's receptive, while George courts Eugene's daughter Lucy (Anne Baxter).

There are definite problems with the film clearly die to the studio's tampering. It lacks the melancholy the story really should have. But overall, it's really good. It has Welles' stamp all over it, in it's camera work and style. Welles's slightly different style really works for this film. We're watching a family that's very different from most, so we need to see their world differently.

The acting is brilliant by all. Tim Holt is good, and appropriately irritating in his role as the spoiled George. Joseph Cotten gives a pretty good performance, but his best scenes are with Anne Baxter. It's great to see the contrast between the dysfunctionality of the Ambersons and Cotten and Baxter as happy, loving father and daughter. Baxter is cute and sassy, but she's abel to show the real emotion when she needs to. But Agnes Moorehead walks away with the picture as George's Aunt Fanny. It's really performance still talked about today. It's a real part of film history. She's wound tightly, and after her brother dies she loses it, and after her sister-in-law dies she completely falls apart. It's a performance of hysterical brilliance.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A-

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride

[img]http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/warner_brothers/tim_burton_s_corpse_bride/_group_photos/helena_bonham_carter7.jpg[/img]

This movie really shows you what expectations can do to your enjoyment. I, myself, went in thinking I would enjoy it. Nothing more, nothing less. To my surprise, it was one of the most entertaining, beautiful movies I have seen all year. A true masterpiece.

Victor (Johnny Depp) is engaged to Victoria (Emily Watson), even though they've never met. They're both nervous, but they're parents don't seem to care. Love is the last thing to worry about when it comes to marriage. Upon meeting each other, though, they fall instantly in love. But Victor is still nervous, and can't remember his vows. While practicing in the forest, he accidentally marries the Corpse Bride, Emily (Helena Bonham Carter) and is taken to the underworld.

The first thing to ooh and ahh over is the animation. It's simply beautiful. Fun, and amazing to look at. Flawless. Then, of course, there's the fantastical Danny Elfman score. His score is perfect. Haunting, melancholy, and at times, hilarious. The songs are really great too. Some are really fun, (Remains of the Day) but some are sad and really tug at the heart (Tears To Shed). The voice work is just awesome. In a lot of animated films, the voicework tends to be theatrical and over the top, but here it's very natural. Honestly, there were times I forgot I wasn't watching real people. Until and eyeball or something fell out, of course.

But the story is what grabbed me. It was a beautiful (I know I'm using that word a lot, but it really describes my feeling best) love story, on both ends. Everyone's love for everyone else was, ultimately, selfless. I also loved the contrast between the underworld and the world of the living. The bleakness and overall "blah" feeling to the living, as opposed to the vibrance of the underworld was really brilliant. Being dead really was more fun than the stiff world above.

The movie was just incredible. Perfect. I can't get over it. There's so much I loved, but I really can't put it into words.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A+

The Curse of the Cat People

[img]http://www.acm.vt.edu/%7Eyousten/lewton/images/s-curse1.jpg[/img]

It's supposed to be a sequel to the 1942 camp horror classic [i]Cat People[/i], but the truth is this bares hardly any resemblance to its predecessor, in story or mood. Some of the cast is the same and they reuse obvious devices from the first, but it's just not even in the same league.

Ann Carter is a little girl who prefers her imagination to actual friends. Only, she's convinced all of it is quite real. Her father, Kent Smith, is freaked out by his daughter's imagination, because of the manner of death of his first wife, Simone Simon, due to, as he claims, her overactive imagination (see to original [i]Cat People[/i]). Carter tries to make real friends, but can't, so she makes a wish on a ring given to her by a shut in old lady, Julia Dean. She wished for a friend, and gets one. Only that friend happens to be her father's dead wife.

The film does a very good job at showing life through a child's eyes, and if it had stuck to that instead of trying to be a sequel and horror movie, it might have been good. But the film tried to draw on too much from the original, and it just got messy. There are simply too many things going on. Dean's character is pretty pointless, other than to give the little girl a friend, but her existence is ridiculous with the presense of Simon. And Simon's character is never really explained either. We know her history from the original, but here it just seems strange and random. We know obviously why she chose Carter, but not why she's actually there. But the most baffling presense in the film is that of Elizabeth Russell, who plays Dean's creepy daughter. Only Dean keeps claiming she's not, though nothing comes of it. Russell appeared in the original as The Cat Woman, but there is seemingly no connection to these characters, and Dean's ridiculous claims never once come to any importance at all.

The movie...just a freaking mess. It makes me mad to think about it.

[b]Final Grade[/b]: C-

Junebug
Junebug(2005)
½

[img]http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/sony_pictures_classics/junebug/amy_adams/junebug1.jpg[/img]

After a summer filled with loud, exciting, flashy movies, it's nice to settle down to the more subdued, quiet films of the late summer/fall season. [i]Junebug[/i] was the first that I had the pleasure of seeing. And it was a HUGE pleasure.

Embeth Davidtz and Alessandro Nivola are newlyweds in North Carolina on business. She owns an art gallery, and she's trying to convince southern artist Frank Hoyt Taylor to show his work with her. During this excursion, they decide to spend some time with Nivola's very southern family. His mom, Celia Weston, immeadiately dislikes Davidtz and her bizarre ways. His dad, Scott Wilson, is a quiet man, who watches more than comments. His brother, Benjamin Mackenzie, holds a little brother-grudge against Nivola. And his sister-in-law, Amy Adams is not only very childlike, but also days away from popping a baby out, and forms a sisterly bond with Davidtz.

The dialogue in [i]Junebug[/i] is particularly memorable, not because it's fast and quick and sharp, but because it's not. It's very raw and real, and beneath it you can really see the emotion of the characters. Speaking of the characters, they're all very fleshed out and interesting. They're all facing conflict brought about not just by Davidtz's arrival, but also the impending arrival of the baby. The family is preparing to welcome not just one, but two new members, and it's clearly taking its toll. I've read criticism that Nivola's character is not well-fleshed out, but I disagree. He's not in the movie a lot, but when we do see him, we also see him conflict. Torn between the person he really is and the person he thinks he really is. He has very few scenes of interaction with any of his family, and the one real scene he has with his sister-in-law in the hospital is the most touching in the movie. It's beautiful to see a touching scene between a man and a woman like that that isn't romantic. The film would be worth seeing for that alone.

All the performances are top notch. Davidtz is typecast as usual as the sophisticate, but she's very good in her role. She's clearly a fish out of water. Nivola's few scenes are awesome, particularly the hospital scene, and the scene where he sings the gospel hymn. Benjamin Mackenzie was a real surprise. He's so wooden on [i]The OC[/i], but he's really good here. He evokes a lot of pity toward his character. But the movie obviously belongs to Amy Adams. She's so full of life. She's absolutely adorable, and while she pulls off her childlike character well, she's brilliant in those moments where she's quite obviously the most adult member of the family.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A

Romance
Romance(1930)
½

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/garbo/garbo55.jpg[/img]

MGM kept Garbo in silent films longer than any other star. Her film, [i]The Kiss[/i], was the last film of the silent era. She didn't start making talkies until 1930, which, luckily turned out to be a huge year for her. The two films she made, [i]Anna Christie[/i] and [i]Romance[/i] were both huge hits, and both brought her Oscar nominations for Best Actress.

Gavin Gordon is a clergyman who meets and falls in love with opera singer Greta Garbo at a party thrown by her lover, Lewis Stone. Gordon doesn't know about Garbo's past, and wants to marry her. Garbo knows that in the long run, she'll only hurt him, so she tries to stay away from him, but the attraction is too strong to fight.

Garbo's gives a fantastic performance. She was never more beautiful than she was here, and she has the perfect amount of fire and hearbreak. Throughout the entire film, she's charming and spunky, but her broken emotions are evident on her face. Gavin Gordon is pretty boring, but few actors weren't opposite Garbo. Lewis Stone is very good, and dependable as always in his fatherly role.

It's not a mind-blowing story or anything, it's a typical storyline for early talkies, but it's shorst, sweet, and to the point. Garbo and Gordon do have very good chemistry, as do Garbo and Stone, which elevates the story quite a bit. But what really keeps the story on track is its focus. It's stays just on the main love story and it's issues. It doesn't get sidetracked by silly peripheral plots.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A

The Opposite Sex
½

[img]http://www.moviegoods.com/Assets/Product_images/1010/33543.1010.A.jpg[/img]

I hate this movie. It's awful. But I hate this movie, and yet I always watch it. I can't stand it. It's just a big ball of suckage.

In this musical remake of [i]The Women[/i], June Allyson plays a happily married former nightclub singer who finds out her husband is having an affair with sexy young Joan Collins. She tries to ignore it at first, but finds she can't, so it's on to Reno, where she finds she isn't the only girl in that boat. Only, unlike most of the women there, she doesn't seem to want a divorce.

Allyson is horrible. She's just an awful actress, and this is one of her worst performances. She puts absolutely no emotion behind any of her words. And the attempts to make her sexy were just ridiculous. Joan Collins isn't bad, but she lacks the raw, predatory sexuality of Crystal Allen. She's like a little girl trying to play at vamp. The supporting cast is decent, but underused. Leslie Neilson, Ann Sheridan, Ann Miller, and Joan Blondell all give good performances, but they're wasted. Some of the characters don't even need to be there.

Sort of like the musical number. First of all, they're crappy number with annoying songs, and they're completely unneccesary. Which makes it even more annoying.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]D+

Just Like Heaven

[img]http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/dreamworks_skg/just_like_heaven/reese_witherspoon/justlikeheaven3.jpg[/img]

[i]Just Like Heaven[/i] is based on a French novel, and the thing I thought the most throughout the whole movies was, "Gee, I bet if this was a direct adaptation it would be a lot more depressing."

Reese Witherspoon plays and overworked doctor who has no life outside the hospital. On her way to a date, she's hit by truck. Mark Ruffalo, a man who has lost his wife, rents the apartment, but soon finds that Witherspoon's annoying spirit still occupies it.

There really is a lot wrong with the movie. For a comedy, it's not particularly funny. There were absolutely no laugh out loud moments, and I kept getting the feeling that they had just told a joke and I didn't get it. This is really the fault of the script, which is, for the most part, a jumbled mess. The dialogue is stilted, and the whole film incredibly predictable.

But there is a certain darkness and melancholy to some of the scenes that's really great, and had more of that been put into the film, it might have been stronger overall. What really saves this movie from the depths of the horribly mediocre are the performances from Mark Ruffalo and Reese Witherspoon. They're both very, very good and share surprisingly fantastic chemistry.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B-

Midnight
Midnight(1939)

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/colbert/colbert153.jpg[/img]

In the midst of the Depression, rags to riches stories were extremely popular. Most screwball comedies were Cinderella stories. Joan Crawford made her career in the 1930s playing shop girls who made good. One of the most obvious homages to the Cinderella story is [i]Midnight[/i], a funny, cute screwball romance that has no problem admitting where its story came from.

Claudette Colbert is a broke golddigger stranded in Paris with nothing but the clothes on her back. Don Ameche picks her up in his taxi, and offers her a place to stay, but Colbert doesn't want to take a chance and runs away, getting into a private party using a pawn ticket and Ameche's last name. She finds herself quickly absorbed into a group of friends including husband and wife John Barrymore and Mary Astor, and Astor's lover Lederer. Barrymore is on to Colbert, and he offers her a deal: he'll pay her to sway Lederer's attentions away from Astor. Colbert is happy with the deal, and things look to be going well, until Ameche shows up, posing as Colbert's husband.

Claudette Colbert was one of the most talented actresses of the era, but she was really best in comedies. She was charming and extremely funny, and her sophisticated style always fit so well with these types of high-brow comedies. I've always been rather lukewarm towrd Ameche, but he's very good here, and his chemistry with Colbert is good. Astor is fantastic. She's always good in the bitch roles she was typecast in. I really enjoyed John Barrymore in this movie. It's nice to see him in something a little later in his career that's actually really good. He has some of the funniest scenes in the movie, and he shares a really interesting chemistry with Colbert. It's fatherly and sweet.

There are some incredibly good gags to go along with the sparkling dialogue from Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett. The reaction shot of the dog = brilliance. I don't think I've ever seen anything so randomly brilliant. The scenes at the breakfast table as Colbert is trying to convince everyone that Ameche is crazy are very good. Unfortunately, though, the ending doesn't quite live up to the romantic potential set in one of the earlier scenes.

And, overall, the best thing the movie does is create a lavish world with sophisticated and funny people. A world that you would want to live in.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B+

Kitty Foyle
Kitty Foyle(1940)

[img]http://www.gingerrogers.com/images/photos/rogg032.jpg[/img]

In 1940, Ginger finally broke completely away from Fred, and made two fine dramas, in which she gave two of the best performances of her career, and two of the best performances of all time. [i]Primrose Path[/i] came first, and was both the superior film and performance, but it dealt with prostitution, and was shied away from. [i]Kitty Foyle[/i] came next, and Ginger won the Oscar for it.

Ginger plays the title character, a lower-class girl in Pittsburgh who finds work during the Depression as a secretary, but dreams of being something more. She falls in love with her boss, Dennis Morgan, and the feeling is mutual, but there are immediately conflicts between their social ranks. Rogers gives up an moves to New York, finding work in a department store, and the love of good doctor James Craig, but she can't forget about Morgan, and he can't forget about her, either.

It's a flashback movie, but it's handled very well. I really liked how in the very beginning Morgan seemed like an almost shady character, but through the flashbacks they show him to be truly sweet and in love, but terribly conflicted. It also puts a lot of scenes from the very beginning into devestating context, like the scene where Rogers is holding the newborn baby at the very beginning. It seems like a simple enoug scene, but once you get to the flashbacks, the importance of the scene hits you like a ton of bricks.

From the beginning, she's torn between two men. She's promised to marry Craig, but at the last minute is invited to run away with Morgan, and the flashbacks are basically her way of deciding. However, there's no suspense in who she's going to choose. From the second Morgan tells her he won't be getting a divorce, you know the Hays Office would never allow them to end up together.

Rogers and Morgan are a really great romantic pairing, and they have some of the best love scenes I've seen in any film. The scene when they're together in the mountains is just SO romantic. Morgan is really charming, but clearly, the whole picture belongs to Ginger. She's just amazing. Funny, heartbreaking, and brave. Originally, Ginger didn't want the role, because the novel was quite high in sexual content, and Ginger was a staunch conservative. But, clearly, the content of novel never would have passed the production code, so it was toned down.

It's a really good romance, elevated quite a bit by Rogers.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A-

Gabriel over the White House
½

[img]http://www.scifilm.org/museimages/gabrielwhitehouse.jpg[/img]

In all honesty....I really don't know what to say about this movie. It's clear, and sort of essential to understand, that it's a product of its time, but even then, there's something about it that just seemed off. Even realizing it was little more than a propoganda piece made by WR Hearst, something about it just seems really.....strange.

Walter Huston is a newly elected president who has made big promises to the country about curing the Depression, which he doesn't intend to keep. His loyal staff of Karen Morley and Franchot Tone hope that he'll do the right things, but stand by him regardless of what he chooses. After a car accident....something...happens, and suddenly, he's transformed into some kind of saintly figure, set on solving all the problems of the world.

Hearst was a big supporter of Roosevelt, and it's pretty clear that the pre-crash president is supposed to be Hoover and that the post-crash president is meant to be Roosevelt, who Hearst was convinced would make the government and country perfect. But Hearst had some messed up, tyrranical ideas about government, and that's just what comes across in his film. The president's first plan of action? Disband his cabinet and congress and declair martial law, making himself the dictator. Now, that sounds like something a villain would do, right? But, he's painted as moral, brave, and heroic.

And even understanding that this was made during the Depression, and with what was going on, something like this probably didn't sound like a bad idea, it still just feels off. And it did to the public at the time, too, who thankfully, likened the president's actions to those of Hitler (who, by the time this was released, had achieved considerable power in Europe).

Walter Huston is particularly good, though, which makes it a shame he's locked in such a bizarre picture. Same goes for Franchot Tone and Karen Morley, who make a really good, if underdeveloped couple.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] D+

Love on the Run

[img]http://www.earlofhollywood.com/thmb_oneslove.jpg[/img]

Interestingly enough, [i]Love on the Run[/i] was originally conceived as a project for Robert Montgomery and Myrna Loy, who had just had a moderate hit with [i]Petticoat Fever[/i]. Then it became a vehicle for Montgomery and Rosalind Russell, who had just finished filming [i]Trouble for Two[/i] together. Then, it was decided Montgomery would star with frequent leading lady Joan Crawford. But finally, Montgomery decided he wanted to make [i]Piccadilly Jim[/i] instead, and Clark Gable was paired with Crawford.

Gable and Franchot Tone are reporters who have had a longtime, antagonistic friendship revolving around stealing each other's stories. Gable meets heiress Joan Crawford, who has just run away from her wedding, and offers to take her away, without telling her he's a reporter. She agrees, but Tone is hot on their trail, as are foreign (it's never really made clear where they're from) spies, whose plans and maps Gable and Crawford have.

Yes, in the beginning, it does seem and awful lot like an [i]It Happened One Night[/i] ripoff. Gable's character is pretty much identical here, but Crawford is a much funnier and more convincing screwball heiress than Colbert. The story quickly takes off, though, once they get themselves embroiled in the whole spy storyline. From there on there's a certain energy to the film, even when the spy storyline is forgotten for the romance and the chase with Franchot Tone.

Gable and Crawford are great together, as always, but as films like these tend to go, the best lines and moments go to the sidekick, and luckily Franchot Tone was just the kind of man who could fill those shoes. He is truly given the best lines in the whole film, and there are quite a lot, considering it's a very smart script. Yes, I'm a swooning fan girl, but Tone give the role both the comedic angle and a certain amount of dignity that a lot of sidekick actors wouldn't have.

The only real problems the movie suffers is the sometimes unintentional unlikeability of the leading man. It's not fault of Gable's, but a lot of the time he comes off as rather mean. Now, he's supposed to be petty, but there are scenes where I just hated him, which is clearly quite a different reaction from the intended, "Ah, the little scamp" type of reaction this character usually has.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] B+

Today We Live
½

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/crawford/todaywelive2.jpg[/img]

For some reason, I seem to be more fascinated by World War I than by World War II, at least when it comes to films. I know that's completely different from most people, but while I enjoy the occasional WWII film, I've never found one that moved me on the level of films like [i]A Farewell to Arms[/i] and [i]All Quiet On the Westernfront[/i]. Maybe it's because most of these movies were made before the second World War. As horrific as that was was, there was something even more strangely tragic about the very first one. It was on a scale that had never been seen, and I always find those films more personal and relateable than World War II movies. [i]Today We Live[/i] is on that list of great WWI movies.

Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone are brother and sister (a little strange watching them as siblings, knowing that they were pretty hot and heavy off screen, and would be married two years later), and best friends with Robert Young. Young and Tone are away at war, and with her father now dead, she must rent the family home to a friendly american, Gary Cooper. She agrees to marry Young, but falls in love with Cooper. She runs away to France to be with Young and Tone, and recieves word that Cooper died in training for the air force. She feels free to marry Young now, and help him through his psychological issues, but soon after their marriage, Cooper returns.

There are small problems with the film. The script is choppy in its dialogue. Clearly, Faulkner was trying to cover up that the people playing his very british characters were very, very American. But those small issues are completely overcome by the power of the story. It's all about selfless love, on all fronts, and making the ultimate sacrifice for the person you love. However, despite their love and emotions toward each other, none of the characters are perfect. Tone is a good man who is closed up and can't express himself. Young is a brave soldier and nice fellow, but a chronic alcoholic. Cooper is a strong, noble man with a jealous streak. Crawford's character seems the least flawes of the bunch, but even her martyrdom is portrayed as being slightly obsessive.

The pairing of Tone and Crawford as brother and sister is very interesting, and lends a subtext to the film that might not have been there otherwise. There's a certain pent up passion between the two, and whether it was written that way or not is beside the point, because it comes across beautifully onscreen. You get the feeling Tone's character wants Crawford to marry Young because it's the closest he can come to having her himself.

And, despite the very american-ness of the supposed-to-be englishness, the cast gives fine performances. It's one of Cooper's best, and one of his earliest ventures into ruggishness for sound films. And he has pretty good chemistry with Crawford, who, for once, gets to be something other than a shopgirl. She really does wonderful things with the role. You can see every horrible thing war can do to a person in her face. But the real stars of the show are Tone and Young. Their chemistry with Crawford is perfect, and with each other it's a revelation. There's a sweetness to their friendship which is sort of a light in the darkness of war. Their final noble act together is beautiful, touching, and moving.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A

The Maltese Falcon

[img]http://www.mikehumbert.com/_088_Dangerous_Female.JPG[/img]

There were two version of the novel [i]The Maltese Falcon[/i] filmed before the noir classic in 1941. There was [i]Satan Met a Lady[/i], starring Bette Davis, which was a sort of strange crime/comedy crossbreed, and this film, the first version, and probably the worst of all three.

Ricardo Cortez as Sam Spade and his partner, Walter Long are hired by Bebe Daniels to follow her a man who is seeing her sister, or so she says. Long is killed, the man he was tailing is killed, and soon Cortez is wrapped up in the search for the mysterious, diamond encrusted Falcon.

There was really only one thing the film did right. Because it was made in the pre-code era, it was able to put across the sexual ideas in the stories. Not only is the sex between Cortez and Daniels hinted at rather explicitely, but the film also manages to work in the homosexual undertones of the story.

But, that's about the only thing it did right. The story is cut down for time, so it's cut apart and pasted together, leaving out plot points and making certain parts difficult to follow. None of the actors seem to have any sense of their character. We're shown that Spade is a ladies man, but Cortez is limp as a noodle, never putting forth any kind of sex appeal or sexual desire. His chemistry with Daniels is practically non-existant. The only chemistry he has with anyone is a tiny bit with Una Merkel, probably the best part of the whole cast. Cortez tries to play Spade as tough, but he simply can't do it.

Daniels is a pretty awful femme fatale. He idea of sexiness seems do be whining in a strange voice, "Oh, but honey". Her facial expressions are just bizarre and she seems almost surprised to find herself in a sexual situation, even when she's the one who instigated it. Dudley Digges is a HORRIBLE Gutman. Instead of being a somewhat imposing presence, he's just a stuttering, befuddled old man. It's impossible to see why anyone in the world would be afraid of him. The only actor in the main cast who doesn't flat out suck is Otto Mattieson as Joel Cairo. And he's not even good. He's just there. The brilliant Thelma Todd (one of the great talents of the 1930s, who is unfortunately forgotten since her career was cut short when she tragically died in 1935, but that's a story for another day) is completely wasted.

But the real crime of the movie is that it completely fails to establish any kind of atmosphere or excitement. There should be a mounting feeling of suspense as we get closer to seeing the bird and finding out what's going on, but there's absolutely no feeling of anything.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] D+

Monkey Business

[img]http://pserve.club.fr/Marilyn16.jpg[/img]

I'll be upfront. [i]Monkey Business [/i]is not one of Howard Hawks' best films. It's more slapstick and farcical than his other films, making feel like it almost isn't even a Howard Hawks film. But, the different type of humor IS funny, and it's awesome to see three screen legends working together, two who were, by this time, veterans, and a new comer who would become one of the biggest superstars of all time.

Cary Grant is a scientist working on a formula to restore youth. He's very much in love with his wife, Ginger Rogers, but after years of marriage, their life together has become a bit routine. He decides to sample the formula himself, but instead accidentally takes a sample from a formula one of the test monkeys mixed. He reverts back to his teenage self, acting reckless and flirting with the boss's secretary. Rogers decides to sample the formula as well, and she too reverts back to her teenaged self.

It's good to see that even 20 years after she became a star, Ginger can still hold her own opposite comedy legend Cary Grant. They go so well together, and their romances is just as fresh and exciting as the romance between young lovers. I actually think Ginger's segment is funnier than Grant's, not necessarily because of her acting (though that probably did have a bit to do with it) but because of the writing. It's always nice to see Charles Coburn in a movie, he's always so jolly and fun to watch. Monroe is pretty good in her supporting role. Her fear of Ginger Rogers after a certain scene where Rogers threatens her is a good gag played through the rest of the film.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of scenes without any "monkey business" which pretty much come to a stand-still. Most of the quips in these scenes just aren't funny, and you just keep waiting for the next dose to be taken. But the movie makes up for it with the final segment, when both Rogers and Grant take a massive overdose and revert to ten-year olds.

And, beneath it all, it's a very sweet romance about a husband and wife finding excitement in their marriage, and learning to be happy with their contentment.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] B+

An American in Paris

[img]http://www.vafilm.com/1995/images/american_paris.gif[/img]

In the 1940s and 50s, musicals weren't exactly considered high-brow. They were certainly loved and acclaimed, but the Academy tended to lean toward "prestige" pictures. So [i]An American In Paris[/i] did something pretty wonderful by being a high-brow musical, and walking away with Best Picture. In was one of the very few Best Picture winners to not have any acting nominations, and it became only the thrid musical to win Best Picture in 23 years of Oscar (the other two were [i]The Broadway Melody of 1929[/i] and [i]The Great Zeigfeld[/i]).

Gene Kelly is a struggling artist living in Paris. He's discovered by Nina Foch, and heiress who wants to help his career, but it's pretty clear she wants a little more than that. Kelly tries to resist her advances, but he does want to further his career. Things get a little messy when he meets Leslie Caron. The two fall in love, but he's afraid to tell her about Foch. But Caron has a secret, too. She's already engaged.

This film probably features Kelly's best dancing. He really worked best under the direction of Vincent Minnelli, because they're styles worked so well together. Caron is beautiful. She's charming, and an incredible dancer. The great Oscar Levant, however, is completely wasted. He's given practically nothing to do, and by the end of the film his character seems completely pointless. He gets one really good piano scene, a fantasy one where he's playing all the intruments and the orchestra and conducting, but it comes out of nowhere and doesn't really fit in the story.

The Gershwin score is memorable, and Caron and Kelly dancing together really transports you to another world. They're fantastic together. I like the blending of their styles. He was a tapper, she was a ballerina, but the got well together (sort of like Astaire and Charisse in [i]The Band Wagon[/i]).

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A-

Black Fury
Black Fury(1935)
½

[img]http://ikoi99.web.infoseek.co.jp/movies/posters-stills/US/PaulMuni.jpg[/img]

In the 1930s, Warner Bros. was known for its controversial, violent film. But surprisingly, the only film they ever made about labor was [i]Black Fury[/i], a film based on a real coal miners strike. It was banned in several states and countries for it's sympathetic look at struggling coal miners, and with all the controversy around it, it's surprising it isn't better known today.

Paul Muni plays an immigrant coal miner who couldn't care less about the union. He's happy with his job and his fiance, Karen Morley. But Morley runs off to Pittsburgh with a police officer, leaving Muni drunk and angry, and soon he somehow finds himself the president of a fringe union. But sweet, slightly dumb Muni doesn't realize he's just being used as a pawn.

Paul Muni was a really interesting actor. He adapted incredibly well into his roles and was a master with accents. While I don't think this is one of his best performances, he's very good. Sometimes he plays up the stupid side of his character a little to much, to the point where it's unbelievable, but he has amazing control over his emotions. Karen Morley, though second billed, is only in about half of the film, but she's quite good. She seems rather boring and cliche as the guilty girlfriend in the beginning, but when she comes and sees what Muni has made of himself, she gives her love and admiration a real emotional punch. There are supporting performances that are pretty good, but nothing of note. Except for John Qualen as Muni's best friend who feels betrayed when Muni joins the fringe union. The acting really is the best thing the film has going for it.

The story drags a lot in the middle, and there are a lot of long scenes of Muni wallowing in self-pity, but the ending is pretty exciting, and there's a pretty good opening, though Muni's turnaround in behavior seems a bit too sudden.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B

The Great Lie

[img]http://www.threemoviebuffs.com/miscreview/greatlie1.jpg[/img]

In the early 1940s, Davis was making lots of women's melodramas. Some turned out great ([i]Now, Voyager[/i]), some not so good ([i]The Bride Came COD[/i]). [i]The Great Lie[/i] was one of the good ones. Not amazingly good mind you, but entertaining and emotional. It's presented as a sort of love triangle between Davis, Mary Astor, and George Brent, but the truth is Brent is just beackground for the 101 minute catfight between Astor and Davis (who, surprisingly, actually like each other quite a bit).

Astor, a famous pianist, and Brent, an aviator, marry almost on a whim once her divorce is finalized. He feels he may have made a mistake though, once he's sober, since he's really in love with Bette Davis. Luckily, he finds Astor's divorce wasn't actually final, leaving him free to marry Davis. But soon after the marriage, Brent leaves on a mission and goes missing in South America. Astor discovers she's pregnant, and Davis makes a deal with her. She'll take care of Astor for life if she can have the baby. The deal goes swimmingly, until Brent returns.

Brent and Davis really are great together. They have a comfortable chemistry that works well for two characters that have known each other for years. His chemistry with Astor is a little weak, but that's okay. There's never any doubt he's going to end up with Davis anyway. The antagonistic chemistry between Davis and Astor is the highlight though. They just seem to love going at each other's throats, and we've got ringside seats. Astor has the flashier role, and understandably walks away with the movie (she won Best Supporting Actress for it), but Davis is good and unusually understated in her more "normal girl" role.

The script is nice. One of the reasons the scenes with Astor and Davis are so good is that the lines are perfectly catty. Davis and Astor actually rewrote most of the script themselves. Yes, the plot is pretty generic, and there's pretty much no suspense in how the movie will end, but the movie really is all about Astor and Davis, and its just fun to watch.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B+

I Walked With a Zombie
½

[img]http://www.weidleverlag.de/zombie.jpg[/img]

Despite popular belief, George A. Romero did not invent the zombie genre. There are loads of popular zombie movies from the 1930s and 1940s, and [i]I Walked With a Zombie[/i] is probably the best of the bunch. Though its ideas are simpler, subtler, and not as gorey as Romero's, it's able to establish a more eerie atmosphere and surrounding idea of zombies than the modern films.

Frances Dee plays a nurse hired to travel to the West Indies to take care of a woman who is practically a vegetable. Her heart beats, and she's almost in a coma, yet she follows simple commands. Though at first the situation seem quite normal, she finds that there's quite a bit of mystery surrounding the woman's illness, apparently involving some kind of romantic rivalry between the woman's husband (Tom Conway) and his brother (James Ellison). Soon, Dee is in over her head, falling in love with Conway so much that she feels the need to go to great lengths to bring his wife back to him, even if it means turning to voodoo to revive her.

Director Jaques Tourneur manages to build an incredibly intense and eerie atmosphere. We fill a bit like Dee does, out of our element in a foreigh place that has foreign practices. The mystery is very interesting, too, and it probably doesn't end the way you'd think it would. There are no brain-eating, rotting zombies running around. She's simply the walking dead, and it's incredibly frightening.

Frances Dee is a pretty much forgotten actress, and I have no idea why. not only was she incredibly beautiful, she was also a very good actress, who always looked like she was having fun in her films. She and Conway are a very good couple. Surprising chemistry is there. Ellison is very good as the brothers, and the three of them create an incredibly intense triangle. The tension in all their scenes together could be cut with a knife.

The film isn't perfect. It could have been a bit longer so the explanation didn't seem so rushed, but there's nothing like good, old fashioned, atmosphere-driven scares, and this one has them in abundance.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B

The Loved One

[img]http://www.nostalgiacentral.com/images_movie/lovedone.JPG[/img]

There's really no other word to describe this movie than horrible. Well, maybe irritating. Yeah, irritating is a very good word. Irritating and horrible. Not only was I more disappointed by this than any other movie I have ever seen, it's quite easily one of the worst movies ever made.

Dennis Barlowe (Robert Morse) is an english poet who has arrived in America to stay with his uncle Sir Francis (John Gielgud), who does something at a Hollywood studio, they don't really make it clear what. When he's fired, he kills himself, and Dennis is left to make the funeral arrangements at the ultra creepy funeral home Whispering Glades. There, he meets cosmetician Aimee Thanatogenous (Anjanette Comer) and becomes smitten. Aimee is interest and excited by Dennis, though she finds him to be ethically challenged. However, she's also smitten with the head embalmer, Mr. Joyboy (Rod Steiger), who is smitten right back.

The film is based on the scathing Evelyn Waugh novel of the same name, which is one of my favorite books of all time. But Waugh focused on the relationship, and the effects the commercialism of the funeral business had on it. The film is just a mess. When I saw on IMDb that it was over two hours, I wondered how they could get a movie that long out of a book that's only 163 pages long. They did that by adding a lot of pointless, confusing, peripheral story lines that are both incredibly silly and trivialize the real story. There simply isn't enough focus on the relationship, because of a really bizarre storyline that was added. The owner of Whispering Glades is in the middle fo some apparently huge conspiracy to get rid of Whispering Glades and turn it into a retirement home. A lot of business is made of him, The Reverend, flying around ominously in a helicopter watching over all his little establishments. It's laughable, and it makes it so the film has no real focus.

Which brings me to the next problem. The film lacks focus on just about everything. It starts out as a satire on Hollywood, and then ditches that to becomes a satire on the funeral business, completely missing Waugh's point of blending the two and showing how disgustingly alike they are. Then the conspiracy side story starts out as some campy mystery about the man in the helicopter, and that's quickly thrown to the side to turn him into a sinister business man. None of the movie makes much sense.

And the characters are all wrong. A few changes wouldn't have been bad, but the changes that were made maked the situations completely unbelievable. Dennis starts out as a bumbling, befuddled brit, but suddenly turns into a callous, almost mean, horndog. Aimee, instead of being very business like, is daffy and seems like a zelous catholic or something. And Mr. Joyboy. Yikes. Mild-mannered, quiet Mr. Joyboy was turned into something flamboyant and strange. And it's these things the hurt the primary love triangle the most. Dennis, while definitely arrogant, really had the best of intentions toward Aimee, but he was english, and she was American, and it was almost impossible for them clear up their social understandings. Instead, Dennis is just an incredibly horny young man, and it seems an awful lot like he wants to marry her just to get in her pants.

The film also makes Whispering Glade far too cultish, almost like a harem or something. I think Waugh's point here was completely misunderstood. He was trying to tie together Hollywood and the funeral business, so Whispering Glades, though efficient and business-like, had a very publicized, Hollywood feel to it. Not a creepy cult feel at all.

And just when you think things can't get worse, there's a weird orgy in the coffin room. The film puts a lot of things in there just to offend you. It's supposed to be a comedy, but I didn't laugh once.

The only reason it gets a 1 and not a 0 is because John Geilgud's brief appearance is fantastic, and though the character was written all wrong, Comer's performance as Aimee is enjoyable enough.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]F

Read the book, it's a masterpiece. This is just garbage.

The Narrow Margin
½

[img]http://img28.exs.cx/img28/638/narrow1.jpg[/img]

In the 1950s, noir was becoming more slick, stylized, and a much more profitable type of film for movie studios, so there were a lot less B-movie noirs being made (perhaps this is one of the things that lead to the end of noir). That's one of the reasons why [i]The Narrow Margin[/i] is somewhat of a treat. It's a rather unknown, low budget noir with unknown stars and a simple story. It's everything that noir was in the beginning, so it's nice to see something so simple in its later years.

A dead mobster's wife, Marie Windsor, is on her way to LA to testify to the Grand Jury regarding a pay-off list she has from her husband, which will incriminate several gangsters. Charles McGraw, a detective, is assigned to protect her on the train to Los Angeles. But she's a holy terror, and the mobsters are hot on their trail, on the train, never taking their eyes off McGraw for a second. But McGraw becomes nervous when the gangsters begin to thing a woman he's struck up a friendship with is the woman he's protecting.

Marie Windsor is the scariest femme fatale since Ann Savage in [i]Detour[/i]. She's shrill, harsh, and downright mean. You almost want to see the gangsters get her. McGraw is great. His voice is perfectly suited for noir, and he's got the perfect balance of hard-boiledness and tenderness. Their interactions are catty and fun to watch, but it's also interesting to see his softer side opposite Jacqueline White.

The film was also a bit ahead of its time. Director Richard Fleischer, a rather underrated genius who also directed [i]20,000 Leagues Under the Sea[/i]and [i]Soylent Green[/i], didn't want to remove any of the walls from the train set, so her shot almost the entirity of the film with a handheld camera. This technique is particularly brilliant in fight scenes, and chase scenes down the hallway. It provides a perfect, intense, and claustrophobic feel.

The film could have been a bit longer, to expand on the story, which would give the ending a little more punch. Oh, and that ending. This film should be a lesson on how to correctly do twist endings. The whole film doesn't rely on the ending, so the rest of the film would be able to hold up independent of it, but it's really a knockout that I didn't see coming.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B

Baby Face
Baby Face(1933)

[img]http://www.altfg.com/Stars/Babyfacestanwyckwayne.jpeg[/img]

The original version of this film was lost until just this year, when the original, uncut copy was found at the Library of Congress. (The version TCM shows is still the edited version, though.) In 1933, even before the film code was in strict enforcement, [i]Baby Face[/i] was denied release all over the country, and it had to be severely cut to remove a good deal of the violence and sexuality. Director Alfred E. Gree tried to get his cast back together to reshoot some of the scenes, but they weren't available, so the film had to be cut to pieces. And it was STILL denied release in several states.

An incredibly young Barbara Stanwyck plays the title role, a barmaid in her father's basement speakeasy, she dreams of more while her father pimps her out for favors from big shots. When the speak easy burns down and her father dies, she heads to the big city, and sleeps her way to the top of a bank. But things go wrong when she gets caught between the bank president and his future son in law, resulting in both of their deaths. The new president, George Brent, sees through her, and sends her to Paris, but on a visit there he starts to fall for her himself.

Even with all the cuts it took, it still seems pretty extreme for its time. Stanwyck seems to be prepping for her future femme fatale roles, though Lilly has a little bit more of a heart than Phyllis Dietrichson. George Brent is only in about half of the movie, but he's a stronger suitor for Lilly, so he offers up nice contrast to the other guys (until an almost-tragic ending). There's a scene where he asks her to sell her jewels to help him out, and she refuses. The look on his face is perfect. Sad, heartbroken, and completely shattered. Not only has he lost his business and his money, he's also lost the woman he loves. There's some innuendo that's so sly it just makes you smile. Stanwyck made 5 movies with Brent, and they have really good chemistry. And, like all the best gold-digger romances, she finds love, but it tooks her a good long while to realize it.

Though the ending feels tacked on, and probably would have been more effective had it stayed tragic, it's still has a good deal of effect ending pretty happily, especially after such a heavily toned film.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B+

In a Lonely Place
½

[img]http://bogart-tribute.net/images3/lonely/lonely5.jpg[/img]

I may be a hopeless romantic who loves the fairy tale ending, but every now and then there's a love story that's so brutal and honest, that it's one of the most beautiful things film can offer you. [i]In a Lonely Place[/i] offers this sord of romance, and it's one of the most powerful flims I've seen, and one of the most intriguing noirs.

Bogart is a screenwriter who's been asked to adapt a book. He hasn't read it, so he invites a hat check girl over to his house one night to tell him the story. When they finish, he sends her home. That night, she's murdered. Bogart is suspected, but he's let off the hook (for the time being) by beautiful B-movie actress Gloria Grahame. In Grahame he finds the love he's been looking for all his life. Though she loves him, she doesn't entirely believe he isn't guilty of the murder, and his violent outbursts begin to frighten her. As she says, "I love you, but I'm afraid of you."

[i]In a Lonely Place[/i] is not a typical noir. There are no scheming dames, no tough guys with a heart of gold getting duped. In most noir films, the murder would take precedence. Here, it serves as the catalyst for bothe the start and the downfall of the relationship. The film really is first and foremost a romance. Graham and Bogart have a great chemistry. She brought something different out in him that even Lauren Bacall didn't. He has a strange sort of violent tenderness toward her.

Bogart is more than just a brute. It's possibly his finest performance. He dislpays amazing invulnerability, while at the same time being frightening and intimidating. But his violent outburst don't scare you. They just make you very sad. Grahame's beautiful was his faithful, gentle lover. There's a scene in which Bogart states the best love scenes aren't the ones where the leads keep telling each other how much in love they are. The best love scenes are the ones with people just being together. "Anyone looking at us right now would know we're in love." There are loads of those scenes in this movie. The murder is solved, but by the time it is, we don't care. The relationship and it's deterioration has completely taken over the film.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A

The Two Mrs. Carrolls

[img]http://bogart-tribute.net/images3/1940s/carrolls3.jpg[/img]

I'm used to seeing Humphrey Bogart as the noir hero, not the villain. But in the late 1940s, Bogey played the bad guy. He played a lot of bad guys in the 1930s, but throughout the 40s he was the hero. So it was weird, and thrilling to see him so scary in [i]The Two Mrs. Carrolls[/i].

Bogart is an artist who meets and falls in love with Barbara Stanwyck while on vacation. She brings him out of a rut, but when she finds he's married, she leaves him. Shortly after he returns home, his wife dies, so he can marry Stanwyck. They're married for nearly two years when he starts to return to his rut. He begins an affair with Alexis Smith, bringing life back to his work, so he begins to plot the same fate for Stanwyck that he plotted for his first wife.

Stanwyck and Bogart are a surprisingly good pair. Both were noir masters, so it's really nice to see them in a movie together, squaring off. It's a little weird seeing Stanwyck as a victim, just like it's a little weird seeing Bogey as a villain. But they quickly find their groove, and Stanwyck gives a vulnerable performance, and Bogart gives an intimidating performance. They're awesome, they own the movie, and while Alexis Smith and Ann Carter give fine supporting performances, the leading duo own the film.

There's a constant, mounting feeling of fear. At the beginning, the house is big and bright, but as the film progresses, it becomes darker and smaller, until the final scene, where the darkness and feeling of claustrophobia completely take over. The atmosphere is perfect, and it's a fun movie.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B+

Topper
Topper(1937)

[img]http://www.kinountersternen.at/images/archiv2004/filmimg40.jpg[/img]

Though Cary Grant is remembered today as a comedy star, in the 1930s he made a lot of melodramas. [i]Topper [/i]was his first comedy, a film that would help him become a star. Constance Bennett, though immensely famous, was also not known for comedy at the time. So with two such stars headlining this film, it's a bit of a surprise that it became such a huge smash hit.

Constance Bennet and Cary Grant are fun-loving, party-going stockholders in Ronald Young's business. Young is married to pushy wife Billie Burke, and doesn't have any fun. When Grant and Bennett die in a car accident, they come back as ghosts to try to loosen their Young up, but it only causes problems in both marriages.

While the whole movie is very funny, the real magic of it comes from the verbal sparring between Bennett and Grant. They're like Nick and Nora Charles in the afterlife. There's a nice contrast set up between the marriages, and that's what the film is really about, the relationships of these two married couples.

Bennett really had a gift for comedy, I don't know why she didn't do more. Grant was very good, though his role really was secondary. Roland Young walks away with the show. He's hilarious. His interaction with his spirit friends, and with people who witness his actions are great, and his movements as he's being pulled around by his friends are very funny.

And, underneath it all, there's a very pretty story about a love that doesn't die.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A-

The Maltese Falcon

[img]http://murdermysteries.com/movie-FreezeFrames/maltesefalcon58.jpeg[/img]

Everyone should know of my love for noir. So, not only is this just a plain old good movie, it's also important to me, because it's really the film that kicked off the noir genre, and it not only made Humphrey Bogart a household name, but it also made him the poster boy for film noir.

The story is basic and classic noir. Private detective Sam Spades gets thrown a job from a pretty girl (Mary Astor) who he can tell is lying. His partner takes the job, gets killed, so Sam has to find out what happened. He takes up with the girl, all the while knowing she's a huge liar, and things get complicated when Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet get involved in the search for the mysterious falcon.

I have to call John Huston brilliant for adapting the book almost word for word. One of the reasons the first to adaptations failed was because they lacked the snap of the book, but Huston keeps the dialogue, giving it the necessary gritty/cool feeling. Also, keeping it so close to the book makes the story much easier to follow.

The cast is perfect. There's a reason Bogey became the face of noir with this film. He's brilliant as the hard-boiled detective, and his relationship with the dangerous Astor is great, almost borders on sadomasochistic. Peter Lorre is his usual sinister self, but it's nice to see him doing a lot more here than he did in, say, [i]Casablanca[/i]. Sydney Greenstreet, in his first film performance, is great as Gutman. His presence is imposing and intimidating.

[i]The Maltese Falcon[/i] is a perfect kickoff to a great period of film.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A+

The Petrified Forest
½

[img]http://www.arabella-and-co.com/Photos/JUne04/PetrifiedForest01.jpg[/img]

Not all filmed plays are bad. Sometimes there are stage to screen adaptations that get a lot of crap for not doing something more creative. Sometimes, the criticism is valid, but not for [i]The Petrified Forest[/i]. Like another filmed play, [i]Mourning Becomes Electra[/i], it keeps things simple and unfancy. Putting a lot of style in it would take away from the message. Filmed as simply as it is, it allows the message and emotion to hit you hard.

Leslie Howard plays a drifter, hitching across America. He stops at a diner owned by Bette Davis's family. He strikes up a conversation with Davis, and they pretty quickly fall in love. The diner is held up by bandit Humphrey Bogart and his gang. They've designated the diner a meeting spot for them with the other members of their group, and Bogart is dead set on staying there until they arrive.

This film has a lot to say, and I'm amazed it was able to say it in less than 90 minutes. Every time I see it, I notice a little subtle thing I missed the first time. Since it was made in the midst of the Depression, there's no escaping the social commentary on the rich and the poor, and while the rich guy in the movie seems a little cliche, he gets a good what-for from his wife who doesn't love him. It also shows the thin line between good and bad, that there's always common ground. And my favorite of all, it shows a love that's so strong, he'd die to give her everything she's dreamed of.

Davis and Howard are such a great couple, and they've always been one of my favorites (see also [i]Of Human Bondage[/i] and [i]It's Love I'm After[/i]). Howard is good as the noble hero. It's a role not many actors could pull off so well. Handled incorrectly, it's the type of stuff that would make eyes roll. Davis, young and beautiful, is filled with life and spunk as the idealistic love interest. Bogey is particularly good, and I'm glad Howard fought so hard to get Warner Bros. keep Bogart in the role her played on stage. It's not like his other performances. He's not as sharp and quick and charming. He's slow, menacing, but sad.

The movie is interesting, intense, and, I think, important.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A

What Price Hollywood?

[img]http://www.filmoguia.com/imagenes/bennec1.jpg[/img]

It wasn't the first film about Hollywood, and it wasn't even the best up to that time (that would probably be [i]Show People[/i]) but it was the first to not completely lampoon the industry. Instead of insulting it, the film puts in a positive, if sad light.

Bennett plays an aspiring actress, looking for a break by working as a waitress at the Brown Derby, a popular hangout for people in the film business. She meets a drunk director, Lowell Sherman, who takes her to a movie premiere and decides to give her a start in films. She becomes a huge star and marries a handsome polo player (Neil Hamilton) while Sherman's career falls apart as a result of his alcoholism.

It takes a rather unbiased look at Hollywood through three characters. They are each given distinct personalities so we can easily see what Hollywood does to different types. Yet the entire blame for whatever happened is never placed on the industry, but on the reactions the characters have to the industry.

Constance Bennett works well in the role. She's very glamorous and has a lot of spunk, and she's very believable in her early scenes as well as in the scenes after she's become a star. Neil Hamilton is pretty good, though most of his scene are made up of him being angry. Lowell Sherman give the best performance, a very sad and heartbreaking one. Apparently the character was based on him.

As usual for me, the only problem I really had was with the ending, which seemed a little too nice and happy and wonderful. Other than that, great movie.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]B+

Riptide
Riptide(1934)

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/shearer/shearer329.jpg[/img]

In 1934, the final version of the Hays Film Code was passed, but things were still incredibly hazy in those first few months, and a lot of pre-code type fare got by. One of those movies was [i]Riptide[/i], a film dealing with wild life, divorce, and adultery. Though Will Hays passed it, it recieved a lot of criticism from Code supporters, and was one of the films not approved for reissue years later, along with films like [i]The Story of Temple Drake[/i] and [i]Born to Be Bad[/i].

Shearer plays a loose woman who meets the very proper nobleman Herbert Marshall. They fall in love, get married and have a baby. 5 years later, Marshall goes away on business, and Shearer goes to Cannes with his aunt, where she meets old flame Robert Montgomery, an depressed alcoholic on the verge of suicide. His love for Shearer brightens him up, but she resists his advances, and subsequently there's an accident which lands their friendship on the front pages. Marshall believes Shearer has been unfaithful and plans to divorce her, driving her into Montgomery's arms.

The script is really clever and original, not just in its dialogue, but in its situations. The opening scene, in which Shearer and Marshall meet dressed as bugs, is hilarious, and the accident it both funny and sad. The set design is gorgeous, but also manages to be very realistic. Shearer's gowns are surprisingly understated for Adrian designs, and she looks beautiful.

The film is filled with very good performances. It's one of Shearer's most even performances. She doesn't screech in melodramatic moments and handles them well, but she again proves that her real gift was for comedy. Montgomery shows once again his amazing range by being very funny, but also clearly putting across his character's deep troubles. Marshall is very good as the quiet husband. And my favorite of the supporting performances is Skeet Gallagher. He's always funny, and he's really entertaining in this.

The only thing I really didn't like about the movie was the ending, which seemed cleaned up for the censors. I don't want to flat out tell you the ending, but I'll say that while there seemed to be a pretty even argument for both men, it didn't end the way I wanted.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A-

Private Lives

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/shearer/shearer311.jpg[/img]

[i]Private Lives [/i]is among the very best of the pre-code comedies. It's based on the excellent Noel Coward play, and while it follows the story almost to the letter, the dialogue is clearly modified a bit for America audiences.

Norma Shearer has just married the serious Reginald Denny, and they've gone to a French Hotel for their honeymoon. Shearer's ex-husband, Robert Montgomery, has just married Una Merkel, and they're honeymooning in the same hotel. Right in the next room. Once they discover this, Shearer and Montgomery can't resist each other and quickly run away together to Shearer's chalet. But soon it becomes apparent why they divorced in the first place. They can't stop arguing.

The script, though modified, is filled with wit and charm. The arguments are funny, their love romantic. There's a whole scene on the couch which is indescribable. It's one of the most romantic scenes in classic film. Though it's set up very much like the play in terms of set and scene length, interesting camera work prevents it from feeling like a filmed play.

Shearer gives her best comedic performance. She doesn't try to make the character overly sympathetic. She's charming, but she's vain and arrogant, and it's hilarious. Montgomery is awesome against her. The perfect foil. He's suave and sophisticated, yet his scenes when he flies off the handle are very funny. Denny is reliable, as always in his role, but the shining star of the supporting cast is the always delightful Una Merkel. She's sweet and slightly pathetic. The scenes where she's wailing loudly would be annoying from most actresses. Merkel makes them some of the funniest scenes in the movie.

I want a DVD release of this, dammit. It's an example of a perfect film.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A+

Sin Takes a Holiday

[img]http://www.basilrathbone.net/films/sintakes5.JPG[/img]

During the Depression, Cinderella and Pygmalion like stories were big. They were the chick flicks of the time. Poor young women finding a rich prince to turn them into a rich princess. But [i]Sin Takes a Holiday [/i]throws a love triangle in, making it a little more interesting than most Cinderella stories.

Constance Bennett plays the secretary to Kenneth MacKenna. She's desperately in love with him, but he hardly notices her. When his girlfriend tells him she's getting a divorce from her husband, and that MacKenna will be named the correspondant, he panics, and asks Bennett to marry him to help him out of the jam. Bennett refuses at first, her pride wounded, but eventually accepts. They're married, and she sails for Paris. On the boat, she meets MacKenna's friend Basil Rathbone. He falls in love with her, but she's still carrying a torch for MacKenna, so when Rathbone asks her to marry him, she returns to New York to see if she still has feelings for MacKenna.

It's clearly a pre-code film through and through. The type of marriage the lead characters have would be banned by the censors four years later, and the use of the word "affair" would give them heart attacks. It's not one of the raunchiest of the pre-code dramas, but it definitely benefits from the time it was made, and the abandon in the area of moral awareness makes the film much more interesting.

Constance Bennett was one of the prettiest, classiest ladies of the 1930s, so it's a little hard to swallow at the beginning that she's supposed to be poor and plain, but she does well in the role of lovesick secretary. She hits her stride, though, once her character becomes used to the new glamours of her life. She shares excellent chemistry with both her costars. Little more is required of Rathbone than smoldering suavness, and he pulls it off, but MacKenna has the more impressive role and performance. His scenes with his girlfriend are funny as he coyly evades her questions, and his love for Bennett seems gradual, which seems like it would be difficult considering he's not given many scenes to work with.

And it ended just the way I wanted it to. That is always a plus.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A-

The 40 Year Old Virgin
½

[img]http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/universal_pictures/the_40_year_old_virgin/_group_photos/catherine_keener4.jpg[/img]

These past few years, comedies have just been good. And most of the best, surprisingly, are the raunchier ones, like [i]Old School[/i], [i]Wedding Crashers[/i], and now [i]The 40-Year-Old Virgin[/i].

I'll skip the plot part because I'm pretty sure everyone already knows it. The cast was just fun to watch. I awlays enjoy Paul Rudd, I have a huge crush on him, and I think he's one of the most underrated comedic talents in film. I think in a few years he'll be where Vince Vaughn is now. The other friends are funny too. I loved seeing Seth Rogan. I loved him in Apatow's teleivision stuff [i]Freaks and Geeks[/i], and especially [i]Undeclared[/i]. His dead pan deliver makes me laugh every time. I also enjoyed Romany Malco, an actor I'm not familiar with, in a surprisingly sympathetic role.

Keener, one of my favorite actresses, is charming and funny as always. She's so underrated, hopefully starring in something so popular will get her some attention that 1999 Oscar nomination didn't. Steve Carrell give an awesome performance, both funny and touching. He's one of the funniest guys alive right now, and he's so likeable on screen. Romantic leads don't need to look perfect. Carrell is handsome in his own right.

And I really liked what the film had to say about love and sex. You don't usually see sex comedies like this, that preach love before sex. The strong message seemed to be "Wait for the one that you [i]know [/i]is THE ONE" and I just though it was a wonderful message.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A

The Divorcée

[img]http://www.divasthesite.com/images/normafilms/The_Divorcee_1.jpg[/img]

I also watched [i]Lady of Scandal [/i]with Basil Rathbone, but I didn't want to waste my time reviewing it, when I can express my view on it with few words. Utterly average in every single way.

Anyway, onto [i]The Divorcee[/i]. I've seen this movie several times. I don't really like it, but everytime it's on TCM I watch it because I have huge, obsessive crushes on Conrad Nagel and, of course, Robert Montgomery. Like [i]This Man Is Man[/i], it definitely has problems with being a product of its time, but it's not as openly sexist as [i]This Man Is Man[/i] is.

Norma Shearer plays a nice girl who love seemingly nice guy Chester Morris, even though she knows he good friend Conrad Nagel is in love with her. Shearer marries Morris, and after an accident caused by his drunk driving, Nagel marries a disfigured Helen Millard. After a year of happiness, Morris cheats on Shearer. In retribution, she sleeps with Robert Montgomery. Morris wants to get back together, but when his wife tells him of her infidelity, he can't forgive her and leaves. Shearer then goes on to live the life of a glamourous divorcee.

I don't particularly like the screenwriting device they used. They made their three leads speak like normal people, giving any clever lines to the characters surrounding them, as if the leads weren't allowed to be quick witted and funny. Montgomery and Florence Eldridge as Shearer's friend have most of the good lines, and it makes the movie world seem unbalances. It's not a nice contrast to have these constantly sitty people hanging around these guys who are completely dull.

And then there's the issue of the chauvenistic tones running throughout. They're actually pretty will-hidden through most of the film. His reaction to her infidelity seems silly and irrational when you compare it to the apparently liberating life she comes to lead as a scandalous divorcee, but at the end, when she says, "Maybe he can forgive me" and condemns her own life, do we realize the movie really was on the husband's side the whole time.

There were some really good themes about friendships falling apart over time, but it was little more than mentioned a few times, and I think it would have been a better movie if they had made it a little longer and put a bit of focus on the friendships that ended through the years.

However, the move is saved from rotten territory by wonderful performances from the rest of the cast. Shearer delivers one of her finest performances, alternating between good girl and vamp very well and easily. She played essentially the same role in [i]Strangers May Kiss[/i], which has the same sexism problems, but doesn't have the same script problems. Chester Morris is good, but thoroughly unlikeable. That's because of his pretty unsympathetic role, so he does well. Nagel is good, though he has little screen time. He's typically noble and very handsome. Montgomery gives the best male performance. It's the film that made me fall for him. He's funny, charismatic, and a joy to watch.

I recommend it for the performances, but don't expect to be entertained by the overall story.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] B- (barely)

Mannequin
Mannequin(1937)
½

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/crawford/mannequin5.jpg[/img]

I was SO excited about seeing this movie. Joan Crawford? Spencer Tracy? FRANK BORZAGE?! What could got wrong? Well, as I found out, quite a bit.

Crawford plays a poor shopgirl in love with a gambler. They seem very in love, and hastily get married. Things seem okay at first, she works in the chorus line, he has a contract on a fighter who's supposed to make it big. But soon she finds he's just a liar and a cheater, especially when he asks her to divorce him so she can marry wealthy Spencer Tracy, then divorce him and remarry. Crawford leaves him, and soon finds herself in love with Tracy.

Crawford's love blind, vulnerable shopgirl is simply unbelievable. Not only is she a complete martyr, but she's also a pretty pathetic pushover, for the most part. When she walks out on her husband, it actually seems out of character. Alan Curtis is good as her husband, but his character just inexplicably crosses the line between bad husband to bad guy. Spencer Tracy is the real highlight of the film. He's convincing as the really good rich guy, and his turnaround from practically being a hermit to throwing raging parties, all because of his love for Crawfords, is completely natural. He and Crawford also have amazing chemistry.

But overall, the characters (aside from Tracy's) are just unbelievable. They make ridiculous choices and changes that just don't make sense. Any poor performances come both from the absolute ludicrousness of the script, and miscasting.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]C+

Roberta
Roberta(1935)

[img]http://www.gingerrogers.com/images/photos/rogg012.jpg[/img]

This is by far the most underseen Fred and Ginger movie, even over [i]Carefree.[/i] It was made between [i]The Gay Divorcee[/i] and [i]Top Hat[/i], and RKO was trying to recapture the magic of [i]Flying Down to Rio[/i] by making Fred and Ginger the second leads. They recaptured that magic, and more.

The leads are Randolph Scott and Irene Dunne. Scott has come to Paris with his friend, Fred Astaire, and his band. But they get there to find they have no job, so Scott goes to see his aunt, the most famous dress maker in Paris, and meets Dunne, a member of the exiled Russian royalty. They fall in love, and when Scott's aunt dies, they take over the store, but things get complicated when Scott's ex-fiance comes to Paris. Meanwhile, Huck gets a job through Tanka, who's really Lizzy, a girl Huck knew back in the states, who's disguising herself as nobility so she can sing.

Though they're the second leads, Fred and Ginger really are the highpoint of the film. They're relationship is simple and adorable, and they're exchanges are priceless. (Ginger: In that dress many handsome strangers will be giving me their phone numbers. Fred: Won't they be surprised when I answer.) Their two dances together are great. "I'll Be Hard to Handle" is light and fun, and they tell their history through it, and "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes" is just about the most romantic thing I've ever seen.

The main love story is pretty flat, though. Scott is decent, as always, but the problem is Dunne, who's about as interesting to watch as paint drying. She also has two numbers which are pretty boring as well. She makes the beautiful "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes" seem hours long. She had a beautiful soprano, but she put no feeling into her songs. Her voice was pretty, but unfortunately the sound technology of the time really couldn't capture her voice well. Luckily, Claire Dodd puts enough spark into the relationship as the foil, and she's really great. Makes ip for everything.

It's a well put together film. It's well paced, the balance between the love stories is perfect, and Fred and Ginger have two of their best dances. The script is really good. It's smart, but not too smart.

It's on TCM at 6:00 AM on Friday, and I recommend it. It's a great, romantic, funny film.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] A+

The Unknown
The Unknown(1927)

[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/crawford/theunknown1.jpg[/img]

Crawford really credited this as the film that gave her a serious start. She's hardly recognizable in it, without the smeared lips and sculpted eyebrows.

Crawford plays a circuis performer who is the object of fellow performer Lon Chaney's affection. She's been manhandled by pretty much every man in her life, and feels like she can connect with Chaney because he doesn't have arms to manhandle her with. Unfortunately, she doesn't feel the same way about him. Even more unfortunately, he actually does have hands. And we uses them to..well...kill people.

Chaney usually derived the horror of his performances from his makeup, but this one is totally psychological. You wouldn't believe the lengths he goes to win Joan Crawford. He was a tremendously talented facial actor, and he really can tell the entire story just throug his face. The moment when Crawford announces her engagement to another man, Chaney goes mad, and it's an incredible moment.

Crawford isn't bad, but it's clear than at this point, she still had a lot to do. It's a little odd to see her playing the victim and not a strong woman who knows how to get ahead.

Overall, it's a pretty horrifying movie. I recommend it to anyone who likes to be freaked out psycholigcally.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] B+

Possessed
Possessed(1931)

[img]http://www.upress.umn.edu/screenstyle/images/class/class6.jpg[/img]

Gosh, I love those Crawford/Gable pre-code melodramas. Gable and Crawford are a great team, and things were just so....naughty. They made four pre-code films together, and I think it's pretty easy to see, they were having an affair through all of them. This is the best among their pre-code movies.

Crawford plays a poor girl working at a box factory who decides she wants to go up the fast way. She meets a man on a train who introduces her to his friend, Clark Gable. Gable is immeadiately attracted to her and takes her under his wing. Now, three years have passed, the happy couple is living a very domestic life, but they aren't married, and Gable doesn't intend to ask her to. Crawford is starting to feel the hardships of being a kept woman. She wants people to respect her, and she wants Gable to pursue his political career, and she knows neither of them can do those things if she sticks around

The storyline is a little pedestrian, and with the wrong people in the lead roles, it would probably fall to pieces. Luckily, Gable and Crawford are just right. Not only do they have amazing chemistry, but they really fit into their characters, the faux sophisticate and the dashing politician. Gable is very good, but like all their pre-code films, it belongs to Crawford. There are so many moments where she has to show what she's feeling through her eyes, without getting a chance to say it. She had beautiful, big, expressive eyes, and she always used them brilliantly.

It's a little short, and probably would have benifitted from an extra 10 minutes or so to see some more interaction between the couple, but what we get is good. The script is good. It's pretty much just melodrama through and through, no witty lines or whatever, but it's all pretty believable dialogue. There's only one moment toward the end where a speech seems a bit overblown.

This film has aged remarkably well, making the scandal more about the gossip and the affair than it does the class distinction, making it a lot more accessible to current audience. Good movie, very good romance.

The Gorgeous Hussy

[img]http://img397.imageshack.us/img397/5515/rtay480po.jpg[/img]

I was pretty excited to watch this movie. Since I first heard about it in 8th grade history, the Margaret Eaton scandal has fascinated me. I've researched and read about it for a long time, and when I found out that it was going to be on TCM for Joan Crawford day, I was ecstatic.

Well, it wasn't everything I hoped it would be, but it was entertaining, for the most part. Crawford play Margaret O'Neal, the daughter of a boardin house owner. She's smart and sassy, and all the guys are in love with her. Staying at the boarding house are pre-presidency Andrew Jackson and his wife (Lionel Barrymore and Beulah Bondi). The two take Margaret under their wing and treat her like their own. She eventually marries the dashing Lt. Timberlake (Robert Taylor), though she's in love with John Randolph (Melvyn Douglas). Timberlake is called to service the day after the wedding and is killed. Randolph goes on loving Margaret, who is now her "Uncle Andy"'s little girl, and unofficial first lady. But their political views are different, and on that front John Eaton (Franchot Tone) looks very appealing. But she's viewed as a scandalous woman, and it may hurt Jackson's presidency.

Some of the facts are understandably fudged with, one to make the ending smoother and happy, and to make the pacing more interesting. However, I found the inclusion of the love story between Margaret and Randolph to be a rather ridiculous, and pretty pointless inclusion. As far as I've read, which is a lot, there was not relationship ever between the two, and it seemed like a prett silly plot device, added in just because it looks better on film for a woman to love one man all her life, though she's been married twice, than is does for her to have loved to men and to have married them both. And then Randolph' death scene.....don't get me started. He died at his home of his lifelong poor health, not the overly dramatic way he did here. The film would have been so much better had it just presented her relationships the way they actually were with her two husbands, and focused more on the touching relationship between Margaret and Jackson.

Other than that one glaring flaw, it was a prett good movie. It's hard to get used to Joan Crawford, usually such a modern woman, in petticoats and ringlets, but after a few moments of letting it sink in, she's good, although it's not one of her best performances. Taylor is good enough in his small part (why he was billed second, I'll never know) but he doesn't really shine, either. Tone is charming as always, but his chemistry with Crawford, which was so good in all their other films, was absent. You'd think getting married to each other had sucked the chemistry straight out of them. James Stewart popping up was surprising, and he was good in his small role. A little too "aw shucks" in the beginning, but he was really sweet through the rest of the film. And now we get to the three standouts: Lionel Barrymore, Beulah Bondi, and Melvyn Douglas. Barrymore is the perfect Andrew Jackson. He's gruff, uncultured, and wonderfully caring. His speech, defending Margaret's honor, is really the high point of the film. Bondi was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance. She was tender and sad. Her last scene with Crawford as she's dying is one of the saddest things I've ever seen. And finally, my favorite performance of the bunch: Melvyn Douglas. As much as I disliked the inclusion of his character, he did an incredible job. I'm used to seeing Douglas in comedies. The only straight drama I've seen him in (besides this) was [i]As You Desire Me[/i], and that was hard melodrama, so he hammed it up. But this performance was so understated. He was quiet, yet passionate, letting all his feelings stew beneath the surface. Just an incredible performance.

It's really worth watching just for those three performances, though it seems a lot longer than it is. Just don't expect any accurate history from it. And don't put too much stock in the lame ass romance.

Dance, Girl, Dance
½

[img]http://images.villagevoice.com/issues/0331/anderson.jpg[/img]

Before Ball was even associated with the word comedy, she flitted around from supporting role to supporting role, mostly in musicals. In [i]Dance, Girl, Dance[/i], opposite Maureen O'Hara, she gives her finest performance.

O'Hara plays a ballerina named Judy, who dances with a troupe of girls, including Bubbles (Ball), a gold digging hoofer who cares more about money and fame than she does dancing. Bubbles goes off and gets a job at a Burlesque, while Judy tries to make it on her own. Eventually she gets a job in the burlesque as Bubbles' stooge, and the rivalry intensifies when they both fall for the same playboy.

The film really only has two main problems, the first being the casting of the lead role. For one thing, O'Hara is just an adequate dancer, and while she does most of her own dancing for the burlesque scenes, the more complicated dances she does are done by a painfully obvious body double. Also, Judy is apparently supposed to be an incredible beauty. It's commented on several times in the film, but at 20 years old, O'Hara hadn't yet reached the height of her beauty, and she looked rather plain in the role. Also, her performance itself just isn't that good. The character of Judy is meant to be ladylike and graceful, but O'Hara overdoes it and makes her painfully quiet and almost shy.

The other problem is the pacing. The 90 minutes went by like 3 hours. It feels as if it's being told in vignettes, not a complete story. It probably would have felt shorter if a better job was made of combining the different elements of the film.

But overall, it's a really entertaining film. There's a beautiful ballet sequence toward the middle of the film, and Ball's burlesque performances are fun to watch. Ball is just awesome in her role as the smart, but seemingly heartless Bubbles. Ball knows how to hit all the right chords of her gold-digger. She knows where she's going, and not just how to get there, but how to get there fast. She strips the character of any real class and grace, and does a great job of feigning it. For the right people. But Ball is also able to show Bubbles' attachment to her friends, even when she knows she doesn't mean much to her. It's a tremendous performance.

It should also be applauded by having a rather unconventional romantic storyline. I won't ruin it for anyone reading it, because the conclusion to it was the most pleasant surprise of the movie for me. Suffice it to say you don't expect it.

[b]Final Grade:[/b] B+

The Shop Around the Corner

[img]http://site.voila.fr/cinepho3/realisat/lubitsch/shoparoundthecorner/rendezvous01.jpg[/img]

Earnst Lubitsch was one of, if not the greatest comedic filmmaker who ever lived. Unfortunately, a lot his comedy came from sexual innuendo, and when he tried to make a film without it, it faltered a tiny bit. While [i]The Shop Around the Corner[/i] is a fun, entertaining, very good film, it can't touch his masterpieces [i]Trouble In Paradise[/i] and [i]Ninotchka[/i].

It is very cute and fun, though. James Stewart plays Alfred Kralik, the head salesman at Matuschek's gift shop. He's been the top employee for 9 years, but suddenly Mr. Matuschek (Frank Morgan) has unexpectedly turned on him. To make matter worse, Kralik doesn't get along with the new saleslady, Klara Novak (Margaret Sullivan). He does have one ray of light in his world, though. An anonymous letter correspondance with an intelligent woman who he's never seen but has fallen in love with. But unknown to him, Klara has the same little ray of light in her life.

The biggest thing the film has going against it is the chemistry between Sullavan and Stewart. There is chemistry, just not the right type. Instead of watching two people we should want to see together, it feels like we're watching a brother and sister argue and bicker, and though the end written and filmed very romantically, it just seems sort of false, because the romanctic chemistry just isn't there.

And that would kill the movie, if it weren't for the fact that, overall, it's actually about the store and the people working there. There's an odd assortment of people, most importantly the kindly old salesman Pirovitch (Felix Bressart) and the mysteriously wealthy Vadas (Joseph Schildkraut). They way they work and interract depending on the situation is great to watch.

The best part of the movie is the storyline for Frank Morgan. He plays the store owner, a good man who loves his employees and his wife. But his suspicions about his wife's unfaithfulness change him, and watching a little bit of heartbreak between the comedy is really jarring, but fascinating.

Stewart and Morgan give particularly good performances. Stewart is good in his typical guy role, but he has some scenes where he has to argue, viciously, with Sullavan, and it's a lot of fun to see him be so mean. Morgan, one of the most overlooked actors of all time, gives the best performance. He's very sad, and we're watching him while his heart is literally breaking. Sullavan is pretty good, but nothing to write home about. She's never been one of my favorite actresses, but she does a fine job here.

While the romance is flat, the rest of the film is deep and enjoyable to watch.

[b]Final Grade: [/b]A-

The Little Foxes

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]
"Action is the last refuge of those who cannot dream."
~[i]Oscar Wilde

[/i]"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that on is constantly making new discoveries."
~[i]AA Milne

[/i]"Progress is not possible without change, and those who cannot changer their minds cannot change anything."
~[i]George Bernard Shaw

[/i]"Actors search for rejection. If they don't get it they reject themselves."
~[i]Charles Chaplin

[/i]"Nobody can be exactly like me. Sometime even I have trouble doing it."
~[i]Tallulah Bankhead[/i]

Northanger Abbey
½

I am one of those who believe that often times films have to make certain changes to a book in order for it to work on screen. For one thing, if films were word for word adaptations of books, some would be something like 8 hours long.

But there's a difference between slight changes and completely changing what the story is supposed to be.

Such is the case with [b]Northanger Abbey[/b]. My favorite Jane Austen novel turned into a piece of shit BBC production.

The only way I can properly get my thoughts on this across is by writing two seperate reviews, one of the book, one of the movie.

[b][size=3]Northanger Abbey
[/size][/b][size=3][size=2]By Jane Austen
[img]http://media.bestprices.com/content/isbn/29/0679601929.jpg[/img]

It's Jane Austen's lightest and most comical book, and her only outright satire.

When sweet and naive Catherine Morland is invited by her neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Allen, to Bath, she fancies herself a heroine, like those in the Gothic novels she reads. She finds her hero in the handsome Henry Tilney, but their 'romance' doesn't progress the way she wants it to. She becomes friends with the friendly but superficial Isabella, and he sweet, goofy, but arrogant brother John, who is courting Catherine, though she doesn't even realize it.

Eventually, Henry's father General Tilney, invites Catherine to stay with them at their home, Northanger Abbey. Catherine is thrilled by the idea, sure her Gothic fantasies will come true. But Catherine's young imagination is overactive, and she creates horrid mysteries where there are none at all.

Austen's novel is a satire. It takes on certain elements of a Gothic novel to poke fun at them. Austen makes Catherine quite unlike her other heroines. Catherine is sweet, innocent, naive, and not particularly talented in any way. She's a character who, like many of the young women of the time, were completely susceptible to the outrageous fantasy life Gothic novels created. Austen makes sure we know it's a comedy. When Catherine is looking for fantasy, her writing is light and comical, so when reality jumps out from behind the corner, we're not surprised. It just makes it funnier.

And it's the satire that makes the romance particularly wonderful. Because there really is nothing horrid going on at the abbey, Catherine is just a sweet, young, adorable girl. It's this girl that Henry falls in love with. He loves her innocence, her imagination, and her complete sweetness. The ending is particularly moving because of the rest of the story. While at the abbey, Catherine lives her life in fantasy, looking for mysteries and pretending they're there. When she leaves the house, she realizes she's been a fool, and she crashes hard into reality. But when Henry comes and asks for her hand in marriage, she gets the fantasy ending to a story of reality.


[b][size=3]Northanger Abbey
[/size][/b][size=3][size=2]Dir. Giles Foster, 1986
[img]http://services.windowsmedia.com/dvdcover/cov150/drt500/t557/t55701izpsa.jpg[/img]

What the hell? The director either didn't pick up on the fact that the story was a satire, or he just decided to ignore it. Either way, he's a moron.

The basic outline of the story is the same. Catherine Morland is invited to Bath by the Allens. She falls in love with Henry Tilney, becomes friends with Isabella and John. She's invited to Northanger Abbey, and looks for mystery in every corner.

Except instead of poking fun at Gothic stories, it becomes one of them. It also chops the story into pieces, ruining the pacing, and placing emphasis on parts of the story that shouldn't be emphasized at all.

First, let's start off with the characterizations. Catherine, instead of being sweet and innocent, is just a complete idiot. I'm surprised she didn't have someone chewing her food for her. She's completely oblivious to everything going on around her. Isabella and John are all wrong. Isabella, while being superficial, carried herself with grace, and treated Catherine as a friend. In this movie, she's a loud, annoying slut of a character, her barely befriends Catherine. Catherine is supposed to feel Isabella's betrayal later in the story (when she leaves Catherine's brother because he doesn't have enough money). It's supposed to be one of the things to shock her out of her fantasy. But no real relationship is established, and Isabella is instead just an annoying side character. But the portrayal of John is the worst. This film turns him into some kind of lustful villain. While John was arrogant and overproud in the novel, he was also a goofy and awkward man who seemed to genuinely have affection for Catherine. There's a scene in the book where he awkwardly, and rather indirectly, asks for Catherine's encouragement in his courtship, and it's actually a sweet little scene. Instead, he's just some kind of fortune hunting man whore.

Henry is horrible, too. In the novel, Henry was dead pan and sarcastic. While naive Catherine often times didn't catch on to his jokes, it was always clear to the reader that he was joking around. But in the movie, he's just....serious. All the time. So he says horrible things to Catherine, that in the book were in jest, but here he actually means them. It's horrible, and makes no sense whatsoever.

And then, there's the fact that it just becomes a Gothic story. Instead of finding reality at every corner in the abbey, Catherine finds that her suspicions are true, and that there really are clandestine and horrid things going on at the abbey. So it completely ruins the love story. There's no innocence for Henry to fall in love with. They fall in love with each other because the story tells them to, and no other reason. There's nothing there to attract them to each other.

It's not funny, it's not satire, and it ends up not being romantic. It's a terrible adaptation.
[/size][/size][/size][/size]

The Major and the Minor

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]"A film is never really good unless the camera is an eye in the head of a poet."
[i]~Orson Welles[/i]

The Lost Prince

I had to post something to rate The Lost Prince. I love Masterpiece Theater.

I have to wait till Sunday for Part 2 of Dr. Zhivago before I post my rating for that.

Closer
Closer(2004)

I think I'm depressed. I've just been tired all the time. I think I'm hungry, so I start to eat, only to find I'm the furthest thing from hungry. In fact, every time I start to eat I feel like I'm going to throw up.

And despite being completely exhausted, I can't really sleep. It's not like I'm completely not sleeping, but I've been getting maybe three hours a night. I go to take a nap during the day, but I just stay awake staring at the ceiling.

So what's the cause? Well it's not just one thing, it's several. The biggest is probably that I was sick, once again, for several weeks without leaving the house at all. Then I got really behind at school. Usually I have a really easy time at school, my classes don't require much, so it's not hard, but when you're out for so long it does take quite a bit of time to catch up, and I've been working so hard that even though I'm not sick anymore, I'm still in the house most of the time. But I'm caught up now, thank god.

My joint condition has been acting up recently, and the ankle I broke last year which never healed properly has kind of stopped working. So I just feel bad all around.

And then there was this guy (isn't there always?) I really thought he might like me. Now, I don't have much experience at all with guys, but there are some hints that are undeniable. He kept telling me how cute I looked and he kept trying to get hugs from me. So I figured, "Great, this guy I like likes me back. This is a realy first." So it looks like things are going great. Our mutual friend told me that this guy wasn't seeing anybody. So last weekend, when said friend was trying to get this guy to ask me to a dance, this guy says he's seeing someone, but he'll still go with me.

Yeah, that's the last thing I want now, because it would clearly be a pity date. So now I'm just not going, period, because I don't want to go with him but I don't want to go with another one of our friends because that would be weird.

So this whole situation just reminds me that I've never had a boyfriend and that no guy I have ever been interested in has ever been interested in me.

And the combination of all those things is making me pretty depressed.

Dead Again
Dead Again(1991)

[b]Dead Again[/b]
Directed by Kenneth Branagh
Starring Kenneth Branagh, Emma Thompson, Wayne Night, Robin Williams, Andy Garcia, and Derek Jacobi
1991
107 minutes
Rated R
[b][img]http://www.affichescinema.com/insc_d/dead_again.jpg[/img]
The Plot[/b]: Mike Church is a Private Detective , specializing in missing persons cases. He helps a woman he calls Grace, who is suffering from amnesia and terrible nightmares. A man named Madson offers to help by hypnotizing Grace, and when he does they discover her nightmares are about a composer name Roman Strauss, who was convicted of murdering his wife, Margaret, in 1949.

[b]The Acting[/b]: Excellent. It?s clear that the cast had a lot of fun making this movie, especially Branagh and Thompson, who put on American accents. Branagh is fun and hammy, while Thompson plays wounded and vulnerable to a T. They both handle duel roles remarkably well, but I think both are at there best in the flashback scenes. Derek Jacobi is effective and creepy as the strange hypnotist. He gives the best performance in the whole film.
The Direction: Brilliant. Branagh shows again what a great director he is. The past scenes are filmed in beautiful black and white, and the whole film has a classic noir feeling. The balance between the past and the present settings is perfect, each feeling like their own entity, while staying the same film.

[b]The Screenplay[/b]: Amazing. It?s one of the most surprising films I?ve ever seen. Each twist is more exciting and shocking than the last. All the characters are well fleshed out, the connections between past and present are clear. This is a really fun and romantic film to watch. It?s a hell of a ride.

[b]Best Scene[/b]: The haunting opening scene, in which we see Roman Strauss in his cell right before his execution, talking to writer Grey Baker (Andy Garcia) it?s eerie, beautiful, and in the end we realize it ties the whole film together.
[b]
What Makes It Great[/b]: The fantastic chemistry between the cast, the classic feel, and mostly the surprises. It?s possibly the most entertaining movie I?ve ever seen.
[img]http://www.branaghcompendium.com/da-rain.jpg[/img]
[img]http://arlenestage.homestead.com/files/SDJ___Dead_Again_5.jpg[/img]
[img]http://dvdmedia.ign.com/media/reviews/image/410DEADAGAIN009all3.jpg[/img]
[img]http://tiffmeister.net/emdead.jpg[/img]
[img]http://www.branaghcompendium.com/romsil.jpg[/img]
[img]http://www.branaghcompendium.com/daum.jpg[/img]

Saw
Saw(2004)

I haven't done this in awhile, but it's been a while since I've seen a really bad movie. I saw Saw (hehe) a few days ago, so these things probably won't be in order at all. So here we go....

[list] [*]I was attacked by a man dressed as a pig, but I don't remember. Oh, wait, now I do. Just like it was yesterday.... [*]My daughter thinks there's a monster in her room, so I'm going to check everywhere but the closet. [*]There's the killer we've waited so long to catch! Quick, hide! [*]The cover of darkness always makes up for the lack of a warrent. [*]We're going to find an incredibly dangerous and insane man. Don't tell the other cops. [*]I'm whiny. Whine, whine, whine. I'm also a bad actor. Bad acting, bad acting, bad acting. [*]I can't reach the cell phone that's inches away from me! I'm going to use this box to smash it, instead of turning it over and cupping the cell phone. [*]I have to cut off my foot to get to the phone. Phew! Now that that's done, I don't care about the phone anymore! [*]Those guys need to make out. [*]We need to show intensity and fear on the part of the character. CAMERA SPIN!!!!! CLOSE UP, CLOSE UP, CLOSE UP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [*]I never knew people getting electrocuted could be so funny. [*]He can't die! He's the Dread Pirate Roberts. [*]Hi, I'm Morgan Free- I mean, Danny Glover. I'm also pointless to the story. And the worst cop who ever lived. [*]The only two minority characters died. I think this film is trying to tell me something. [*]You have just terrorized me and my daughter, so I'm not going to shoot you, I'm just going to point the gun at you. I'm going to turn my head, count to 50, and when I turn around you'd better still be there. [*]I have cancer and I couldn't hold in a cough for 30 seconds while making a tape, but I can hold it in for several hours while acting like I'm dead. [*]I have a slow acting poison in me, so instead of going to a hospital and asking for help, I'm going to kill people instead. [*]What does this scene need? Ah, yes, Loud industrial music. [/list]

Experiment in Terror

[b]Experiment in Terror
[/b]Directed by Blake Edwards
Starring Lee Remick, Glen Ford, and Ross Martin
1962
127 minutes
Not Rated
[img]http://d1520.u23.asthost.net/covers/experimentterrordvd.jpg[/img]

[b]The Plot: [/b]Kelly Sherwood is a bankteller who is being terrorized by a murderer who wants her to steal $100,000 from her employer. He says if she cooperates and doesn't call the police, she'll get 20%. But she doesn't, he'll kill Kelly and her sister Tobey. The only thing she can identify is his asthmatic voice. Ignoring the mysterious man's threats, she calls FBI agent Ripley, who soon becomes hot on the killer's trail. The mysterious man continues to terrorize Kelly, and she doesn't know if he truely knows that the cops or involved, or if he's just bluffing.

[b]The Acting: [/b]Very good, especially considering a good deal of the film's intensity relies on the performances. Remick's fear and bravery are pitch perfect. She has a quiet anxiety today's 'scream queens' lack. Ford gives one of his best performances, as the quietly dependable FBI agent, and Ross Martin is perfect as the creepy stalker. It's rare that an actor can arouse the type of fear he does using just his voice.

[b]The Directing:[/b] Perfect. It's surprising Edwards didn't make more 'serious' films considering this and Days of Wine and Roses are so fantastic. He creates a frightening atmosphere, free of SFX and explosions. The cinematography is certainly a high note (it looks like Lynch was greatly influenced by the style of this film). The lighting is perfect, and sets the tone more than anything else in the film. Edwards is able to even create a terrifying mood in broad daylight and in the middle of a crowd.

[b]The Script:[/b] Unlike modern thrillers, the script is based around the characters. The films takes on an emotional punch because we aren't simply scared, we are worried about characters we care about. Even the killer has a sympathetic side. He's a man with a nice girlfriend who has a son he loves and visits in the hospital. Each character has something to offer to the story, which makes this thriller so much more enjoyable than others.
[b]
Best Scene:[/b] The creepy opening scene, in which Kelly arrives home after a late party to be attacked by her stalker. Like Kelly, we cannot see his face. But we can hear his breathing, hear his voice, and it's enough to send shivers down your spine. It's a voice I'll never forget.

[b]What Makes it Great:[/b] It's able to establish a mood of terror just by using great music and excellent cinematography. This movie really is the perfect thriller.

[img]http://web.ukonline.co.uk/ces.dell/experiment/45experi.jpg[/img]
[img]http://www.littlereview.com/remick/articles/expterr1.jpg[/img]
[img]http://www.moviepoopshoot.com/diatribe/images/2003/june10/terrorgarage.jpg[/img]
[img]http://www.moviepoopshoot.com/diatribe/images/2003/june10/terrorpowers.jpg[/img]

As You Desire Me

[b]As You Desire Me[/b]
Directed By George Firzmaurice
Starring Greta Garbo, Melvyn Douglas and Erich Von Stroheim
1932
Not Rated
70 minutes
[img]http://www.art-posters.net/posters/newart/ll3254.jpg[/img]
[b]The Plot[/b]: Zara is a night club singer who can only remember the past nine years of her life. She?s living with the sadistic writer Salter, who manipulates her. She?s presented with the chance to get out of her situation when Tony comes along, claiming that Zara is Maria, the long lost wife of his best friend, Bruno. Even though Zara can?t remember, she takes the chance to leave and heads off to Italy with Tony. Tony is convinced that Zara is Maria, while both Zara and Bruno doubt it. Zara falls in love with Bruno, so she tries to become Maria by dressing like her and reading her diary. But Salter?s scheming comes between the couple, and causes them to doubt Zara?s identity.

[b]The Acting[/b]: Really good. Garbo gives on of the top 5 performances ever here. Her change from alcoholic singer to the kind Maria is gradual, and Garbo pulls off the mystery of the role like no one else could. Erich Von Stroheim is the personification of sadism. The pleasure he gets from ruining Zara borders on terrifying. He?s a great villain. Douglas pulls of the romantic well. He balances his love for Zara and Marie, and his doubt for Zara.
[b]
The Direction[/b]: Beautiful. The setting is jaw dropping, and it?s photographed in the most incredible way. Even in black and white, the gorgeous nature scenes look perfect. Fitzmaurice uses wide shots in the beginning of the film when Zara is lost, and then the shots gradually become tighter and tighter as she becomes more comfortable in her role as Maria.

[b]The Script[/b]: Great. In fact, you can read it here: http://geocities.com/emruf3/desire.html . It leaves you with the mystery of Zara, never revealing if she is indeed Maria, only that love has saved her. It?s a beautiful story of love and doubt.

[b]Best Scene[/b]: Zara comes home drunk with three men, and Salter confronts her and kicks the men out. Then he takes advantage of her drunken weakness by forcing a kiss on her. It?s a very sexy scene, and Von Stroheim gives an excellent performance.

[b]What Makes It Great[/b]: It?s one of the most idealistic love stories I?ve ever seen. Bruno doubts Zara, but he loves her so much that it overcomes his doubt of her. It?s heartbreakingly romantic and surrounded by a sexy sense of mystery.
[img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/garbo/garbo108.jpg[/img]
[img]http://home.hiwaay.net/%7Eoliver/ggasyoudesireme1.jpg[/img]
[img]http://home.hiwaay.net/%7Eoliver/ggasyoudesireme2.jpg[/img]
[img]http://img58.exs.cx/img58/4500/erichandgretagarbo.jpg[/img]

Murder by Death
½

[img]http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00005RDRO.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg[/img]

Just see it. I can't describe it. One of the funniest movies I've ever seen.

[b][url="http://imdb.com/name/nm0000393/"]Sam Diamond[/url][/b]: I'll be around if you need me. All you gotta do is whistle, and you know how to whistle, don't ya, baby?
[b][url="http://imdb.com/name/nm0107281/"]Tess Skeffington[/url][/b]: Certainly. What do you mean? I don't understand you...
[b][url="http://imdb.com/name/nm0000393/"]Sam Diamond[/url][/b]: All right, never mind. Forget it. You ruined it.

AVP - Alien Vs. Predator

I'm sad because I think I forgot a lot of good things because I didn't do this while it was fresh in my mind. I wanted to see John Heffron on Leno, so I took a shower right when I got home so I wouldn't miss it. Sorry if I forget something really good. As always, spoilers.


[list=1][*]This movie's been on for 2 minutes and I'm already freezing.[*]I thought the participation of Lance Henriksen would make this movie better. I was wrong.[*]I bet that penguin's gonna get it.[*]Once again, it was the Taxi trailer that topped it all off.[*]Those chicks are totally lesbians.[*]Those dudes totally love eachother.[*]What kind of a movie is this?[*]Thats long hole has to be some sort of euphemism...[*]I don't know how much more of this italian dude's broken english I can take.[*]Lance Henricksen, you fucking moron.[*]OOH, A RULE HAS BEEN BROKEN[*]ooh, Matrix-y[*]I bet the directed thought he had a great idea with slo-mo action[*]Pepsi plug. I'm drinking Coke. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA[*]Seriously, why does he think the pepsi lid will bring him luck?[*]K-I-S-S-I-N-G Alien and Predator kissing in a tree....[*]Didn't you just say reading hieroglyphics was difficult? [*]That's an awful lot of writing for such a small story. [*]Why are all the foreign people getting picked off?[*]I get it. The aliens are like Iraq.[*]This movie wants me to hate foreign people.[*]I didn't know Predator's were like protective teddy-bears.[*]Yes, take the pepsi lid. Because it did you're italian friend a lot of good.[*]This is turning into the most bizarre romance film I've ever seen.[*]If there's not a hot predator-human sex scene, I'm going to be very disappointed.[*]Oh, the Predators are Jamaican![*]Oh my god, that shot HAS to be my computer background[*]The moral of the story is that there's a little predator in all of us[*]She's going to have a hard time explaining this when she gets home.[*]THAT'S why they needed to get it on! So in the sequel the Predator-Human hybrid could do battle with the Predator-Alien hybrid.[*]The sequel I would like the see: Freddy vs. Jason. Predator vs. Alien vs. The Leprechaun. And The Leprechaun wins and does a jig on all their bodies.[/list]

Before Sunset

So very bored...

[img]http://img30.exs.cx/img30/3987/fg.jpg[/img]
[img]http://img30.exs.cx/img30/8375/asyou.jpg[/img]


And here's the one I'm using:

[img]http://img30.exs.cx/img30/2916/lakebc.jpg[/img]

Collateral
Collateral(2004)
½

[b]Best Picture[/b]
[i]The Aviator[/i]
Closer
Finding Neverland
The Phantom of the Opera
Vanity Fair
[b]Don?t Count Out[/b]: [u]Alexander, Proof, The Life Aquatic, Ray[/u]
Yes, I took Alexander out of the final five. It will definitely be in the race, but my gut is screaming at me that it?s going to suck. I could be wrong, but I trust my gut enough to move is out. Aviator is still looking like the front runner, and the trailer for Closer was better than I could have hoped. It is definitely looking to be the big indie of the year. Finding Neverland is clearly Oscar bait, but it?s a biopic about a beloved writer. Musicals have been huge the past few years, so Phantom of the Opera found it?s way into the final five. Vanity Fair is the Focus Features Oscar film this year, and they?re becoming big hitters in the award season.
[b]
Best Actor[/b]
Jim Carrey, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
[i]Johnny Depp, Finding Neverland[/i]
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Aviator
Jamie Foxx, Ray
Jude Law Closer
[b]Don?t Count Out[/b]: [u]Bill Murray, The Life Aquatic; Tom Cruise, Collateral; Liam Neeson, Kinsey; Jeff Bridges, The Door in the Floor[/u]
Jim Carrey received rave reviews for his touching turn in Eternal Sunshine, and he's an actor who hasn't even received his due in nominations, so this is looking like his year to finally get some academy respect. Depp seems to be the frontrunner at this point. He's playing a loved writer in a biopic. DiCaprio will ride The Aviator's success to nomination. Jude Law is supposedly fantastic in Closer, and it's a big year for him film-wise. Jamie Foxx will strike a chord due to Ray Charles?s recent death. Murray could ride last years nomination to one this year, but the Best Actor race is shaping up to be quite tough. If Life Aquatic doesn?t get love in the other categories, Murray could miss his second chance. Cruise was on playing the asshole, but that may actually work against him. Liam Neeson is always great, but the controversial subject matter may cause voters to shy away. Bridges received some of the best reviews of his career for The Door in the Floor, and he was snubbed last year, but it looks like Focus will be putting all it?s hope in Vanity Fair.
[b]
Best Actress[/b]
Joan Allen, The Upside of Anger
Kim Basinger, The Door in the Floor
Gwenyth Paltrow, Proof
[i]Kate Winslet, Finding Neverland[/i]
Reese Witherspoon, Vanity Fair
[b]Don?t Count Out[/b]: [u]Naomi Watts, We Don?t Live Here Anymore; Renee Zellweger, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason; Nicole Kidman, Dogville[/u]
Oscar likes Joan Allen, if the movie turns out even halfway good, she should get recognition. Paltrow is apparently the best thing about Proof. Winslet will be coming off a huge year with both Neverland and Sunshine, and the Academy won't be able to ignore her. She'll probably nab the nod for the more Oscar-friendly film, and since she's way overdue, she'll probably win this year, finally. Reese Witherspoon will hopefully put her talent to good use in a serious turn in Vanity Fair. She looks great in the trailer. Basinger apparently gives her best performance ever in The Door in the Floor, she?s getting noticed as the best part of a great film. Watts looks great in the trailer for We Don?t Love Here Anymore, but the similarities between it and Closer are very noticeable, and the voters are more likely to recognize Closer. Edge of Reason isn?t shaping out like a lot of fans were hoping, and they may take it out on Zellweger. Kidman was apparently great in Dogville, but the release date, coupled with the controversial film and the split from the critics hurts her chances.
[b]
Best Supporting Actor[/b]
Jim Broadbent, Vanity Fair
[i]Morgan Freeman, An Unfinished Life[/i]
Ryan Gosling, Stay
Anthony Hopkins, Proof
Clive Owen, Closer
[b]Don't Count Out[/b]: [u]Peter Sarsgaard, Garden State; Don Cheadle, Crash; Willem Dafoe, The Life Aquatic[/u]
Vanity Fair's supporting cast is so huge it could be anybody. I think VF will definitely score a nomination in this category, but I really don't know who for. If James Purefoy is as good as he looks in the trailer, he could nab it instead of oscar veteran Broadbent. Morgan Freeman has been so overlooked that it seems impossible he won't get it for this much buzzed about film. Gosling is one of the finest young actors working, and apparently his work in The Notebook is great, and even though that film probably won't get oscar love, it may help his chances for Stay. Hopkins could split it between Alexander and Proof. If he has great father-daughter chemistry with Paltrow, he'll get it for Proof. Clive Owen apparently owns Closer. I find it hard to believe the Academy will ovelook Garden State in the major categories, and Sarsgaard just seems the most likely nominee. The trailer montage for Crash was great, and Cheadle is so under rated, that hopefull he'll find himself in the race. I have no idea how big Dafoe's role in Aquatic is, but come on. It's WILLEM DAFOE.
[b]
Best Supporting Actress[/b]
[i]Cate Blanchett, The Aviator[/i]
Hope Davis, Proof
Laura Dern, We Don't Live Here Anymore
Laura Linney, Kinsey
Natalie Portman, Closer
[b]Don't Count Out[/b]: T[u]handie Newton, Crash; Anjelica Huston, The Life Aquatic; Evan Rachel Wood, The Upside of Anger; Naomi Watts, Stay[/u]
Blanchett is playing a loved Hollywood icon, and from the few clips we see of her in the trailers, she looks great. Plus, she's overdue for a win. Hope Davis was a hopeful last year for American Splendor, and hopefull that breakout role will help her get a nomination for Proof. There was strong buzz for Dern at Sundance, and it's been years since she's had an acclaimed performance. Oscar loves a comeback. Linney is alwso an often overlooked actress, and this juicy role may get her another nod. Portman's looking to have a great year with Closer and Garden State, but Closer is apparently a surprising change of pace for Portman, and the buzz for her is great. Newton looked fantastic in the Crash montage. I'm not sure about the roles in Aquatic, but one should never count out Anjelica Huston. Evan Rachel Wood came so close to getting a nod last year (damn you, Keisha Castle Hughes) and if she's half as good in Upside of Anger as she was in Thirteen, she'll definitely be in the race.

[b]Best Director[/b]
Michael Mann, Collateral
Mira Nair, Vanity Fair
Mike Nichols, Closer
[i]Martin Scorsese, The Aviator[/i]
Oliver Stone, Alexander
[b]Don't Count Out[/b]: [u]Zach Braff, Garden State; John Madden, Proof; Paul Haggis, Crash; Wes Anderson, The Life Aquatic[/u]
This is probably the category that Collateral will get some love in. Vanity Fair is a huge production, and I just don't see how Nair woulnd't get a nom. Mike Nichols should ride the Closer high to a nod. But it's looking like it going to be Scorsese's year. He's never won an oscar, and this film looks fantastic. It should finally win him his gold. I'm not sure how long I'm going to keep Stone on the list, because, like I said, I have a gut feeling that Alexander is going to suck. Braff could get indie love for Garden State. If Proof is good, Madden could get his first nom since Shakespeare in Love, but advanced word isn't so hot. If Crash get good reviews Haggis could be looking at a breakthrough nomination. Anderson is always a possibility, but it seems that Aquatic will get more love for it's screenplay

[b]Best Original Screenplay[/b]
The Aviator
[i]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/i]
Garden State
I Heart Huckabees
The Life Aquatic
[b]Don't Count Out[/b]: [u]Stay, Crash, Collateral, Spanglish[/u]
The Aviator will probably get a nod just for being the Best Picture frontrunner. Eternal Sunshine not only had a fantastic screenplay, but also a huge amount of critical love. This should be Kaufman's year. Garden State was THE Sundance hit, but with Closer looking to be the indie fave this year, Garden State will probably get it's love here. It also has a rather large chance of beating out Sunshine. I Heart Huckabees should be just weird enough to get what "look, we're hip" nomination. Wes Anderson is brilliant. How could Aquatic not get some love. I took Stay off the list because I got weary do to the script for Troy. But Benioff's brilliant 25th Hour keeps Stay in the running. Crash seems to be the character drama of the year. Collateral is a possibility, just judging by the dialogue in the trailer. And the lighthearted Spanglish will probably be in the running, too.
[b]
Best Adapted Screenplay[/b]
[i]Closer[/i]
Finding Neverland
Proof
Vanity Fair
We Don't Live Here Anymore
[b]Don't Count Out[/b]: [u]A Home at the End of the World, Phantom of the Opera, Ladies in Lavender[/u]
With Closer looking to be the indie darling, this should be an easy win. Finding Neverland will probably nab a nod if it gets a BP nod. Proof will probably land a nod here even if the movie is mediocre, just because of the pedigree of the talent. Vanity Fair is a classic novel and if it's any good at all it's should be a guarenteed nomination. We Don't Live Here Anymore will hopefull follow in the footsteps of In the Bedroom and grab a nomination. A Home at the Endof the World's buzz isn't so hot. Phantom of the Opera is a risky move, and Ladies in Lavender's buzz dropped fast.

Anchorman - The Legend Of Ron Burgundy
½

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night.
[i]~Egar Allan Poe

[/i]So on Saturday I left for Richmond to see my favorite cousin, Linda. She's ten years older than I am, and we didn't become close until a few years ago. She had her life pretty fucked up for a while, but she went to college and got straightened out. Unfortunately, she lives in Phoenix, so we only see her once a year.

We stayed at my grandma's, which I love doing. Her house is ten times nicer than ours. My cousin and I both needed to go shopping. She needed new powder and I needed a gift for my dad's birthday. We went to Dillards and tried clothes on over our other clothes, and I felt stupid for never thinkging of that before, because I hate changing rooms. We went to Target (I ended getting my dad some kitchen supplies) and looked at jewelry. I saw this huge ring, and it hit me that the one thing I need in life is a big ring. So whenever I I do something with my hands, like pay for a movie ticket, or play the piano, someone will say, "My, that's a big ring you have." Unfortunately, it was 10.00, and I needed the mascara more.

On the way home we stopped in a crappy subway. We were the only ones in there, and we're pretty sure the two guys working there were stoned. On the way home we tried to remember if they had worn gloves while they were making the sandwiches. We couldn't. And as we get closer to my grandma's house and further away from the city, we came upon a very nice subway that was well populated. Damn you, Richmond.

On Sunday we celebrated my dad's birthday. It wasn't that big of thing, just family and food. Then my cousin and I went to see Manchurian Candidate, which was excellent. WE bought our tickets, and we weren't really listening when the ticket lady told us which theater it was in. So we went and got food, and then we started walking down the hal. WE didn't see it, so we tried to remember what number she said. We thought maybe 12. We came up to this door that said "Theaters 7-11" and we though "well, maybe it's in there" ** yes, we're dumb. We went through the door, and it smelled like a urinal. It was disgusting. But the movie wasn't back there. We're thinking "What the Fuck?" So we get our tickets out to look at them, and it's theater 2. So we had to go all the way back through the doors and down the hall. It was in the front of the theater. But, like I said, the movie was wonderful. During the whole final 15 minutes we were digging our fingernails into eachother's arms.

On Monday my parents left. I decided to stay. They had brought home cabinets that my uncle gave them, but they had to use my uncle's truck, so he got our car, and on Tuesday my brother was going to come down and exchange to cars so I could get a ride. My cousin's friend from Indy came to town for the day with her daughters, who were adorable. But I got the impression that her friend really didn't like me. They were all going to go to dinner together, and I wasn't going to go, but I wanted to give my grandma some time to herself. She had had company since the middle of June. So I went along, and it was an awkward meal. Luckily, they left right after dinner. Linda and I then went to see a late showing of Anchorman. And this time, we knew where we were going, Unfortunately, it was in the smelly area. And the theater was small and icky. And the pop I got at the gass station smelled funny. But the movie was funny. I think the other people probably though we were stoned, because we laughed at the exact same things with the exact same rhythm.

On Tuesday my grandma took me took lunch and then shopping, because we never have any time by ourselves since I live in another town, and she always has alone time with my other cousins. So we went to Applebees for lunch, then went to Target, and get this. SHE BOUGHT ME THE BIG RING! I'm so pleased with it. She also bought me Big Fish, which is awesome.

My brother picked me up that night, and on the way home we stopped at Arnolds, this 50's drive in restaurant. Grease was on the tv, and I was singing the songs and that was fun. I usually get the chicked fingers, but this time I decided to try a sandwich. But it REALLY sucked.

And so that was my fun, extended weekend. The only thing is that now I'm getting my days all mixed up.

~Katie~

The Manchurian Candidate

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night.
[i]~Egar Allan Poe

[/i]So on Saturday I left for Richmond to see my favorite cousin, Linda. She's ten years older than I am, and we didn't become close until a few years ago. She had her life pretty fucked up for a while, but she went to college and got straightened out. Unfortunately, she lives in Phoenix, so we only see her once a year.

We stayed at my grandma's, which I love doing. Her house is ten times nicer than ours. My cousin and I both needed to go shopping. She needed new powder and I needed a gift for my dad's birthday. We went to Dillards and tried clothes on over our other clothes, and I felt stupid for never thinkging of that before, because I hate changing rooms. We went to Target (I ended getting my dad some kitchen supplies) and looked at jewelry. I saw this huge ring, and it hit me that the one thing I need in life is a big ring. So whenever I I do something with my hands, like pay for a movie ticket, or play the piano, someone will say, "My, that's a big ring you have." Unfortunately, it was 10.00, and I needed the mascara more.

On the way home we stopped in a crappy subway. We were the only ones in there, and we're pretty sure the two guys working there were stoned. On the way home we tried to remember if they had worn gloves while they were making the sandwiches. We couldn't. And as we get closer to my grandma's house and further away from the city, we came upon a very nice subway that was well populated. Damn you, Richmond.

On Sunday we celebrated my dad's birthday. It wasn't that big of thing, just family and food. Then my cousin and I went to see Manchurian Candidate, which was excellent. WE bought our tickets, and we weren't really listening when the ticket lady told us which theater it was in. So we went and got food, and then we started walking down the hal. WE didn't see it, so we tried to remember what number she said. We thought maybe 12. We came up to this door that said "Theaters 7-11" and we though "well, maybe it's in there" ** yes, we're dumb. We went through the door, and it smelled like a urinal. It was disgusting. But the movie wasn't back there. We're thinking "What the Fuck?" So we get our tickets out to look at them, and it's theater 2. So we had to go all the way back through the doors and down the hall. It was in the front of the theater. But, like I said, the movie was wonderful. During the whole final 15 minutes we were digging our fingernails into eachother's arms.

On Monday my parents left. I decided to stay. They had brought home cabinets that my uncle gave them, but they had to use my uncle's truck, so he got our car, and on Tuesday my brother was going to come down and exchange to cars so I could get a ride. My cousin's friend from Indy came to town for the day with her daughters, who were adorable. But I got the impression that her friend really didn't like me. They were all going to go to dinner together, and I wasn't going to go, but I wanted to give my grandma some time to herself. She had had company since the middle of June. So I went along, and it was an awkward meal. Luckily, they left right after dinner. Linda and I then went to see a late showing of Anchorman. And this time, we knew where we were going, Unfortunately, it was in the smelly area. And the theater was small and icky. And the pop I got at the gass station smelled funny. But the movie was funny. I think the other people probably though we were stoned, because we laughed at the exact same things with the exact same rhythm.

On Tuesday my grandma took me took lunch and then shopping, because we never have any time by ourselves since I live in another town, and she always has alone time with my other cousins. So we went to Applebees for lunch, then went to Target, and get this. SHE BOUGHT ME THE BIG RING! I'm so pleased with it. She also bought me Big Fish, which is awesome.

My brother picked me up that night, and on the way home we stopped at Arnolds, this 50's drive in restaurant. Grease was on the tv, and I was singing the songs and that was fun. I usually get the chicked fingers, but this time I decided to try a sandwich. But it REALLY sucked.

And so that was my fun, extended weekend. The only thing is that now I'm getting my days all mixed up.

~Katie~

The Village
The Village(2004)

Eh, this probably won't be as funny as the King Arthur one, but I figured why not. Spoilers, probably.


[list] [*]Ooh, Joaquin. You're hot. [*]Is it wrong for me to think retarded Adrien Brody is hot? [*]William Hurt: still sexy [*]Oh my god, her name is Kitty! Her name is Kitty on Arrested Development, too! That is awesome! [*]Yes, my sexy retard... [*]Whatever color Joaquin is, I'll bet it's hot. [*]Get off my Joaquin. [*]I can't believe he let her into the room. Did he think she was going to hug the retard after he stabbed her boy toy? [*]Why is an entire town scared of a hedgehog in a cape? [*]And here comes the shitty cop out ending.... [*]Michael Pitt is a pansy. [*]This is the least frightening 'horror' scene I've ever witnessed. [*]The blind girl just killed the retard. [*]Is this movie trying to make me hate handicapped people? [*]Adrien Brody just fell into a plot hole. [*]This movie is so depressing I think I'll go home and kill myself. [*]Why did the retard decide to put on the cape and run through the woods growling? [*]I hate you, M. Night. [/list]

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle

[size=2][b]Quote of the Day
[/b][/size][size=2]"I wore a monocle to some effect. As a result of this, when my next role came along, that of a pirate in a thing called 'Slave Ship,' I was again called upon to wear a monocle. It was useless for me to protest that at the time of this particular story monocles had not yet been invented. Such pedantry made little impression on the film's producer, and I duly became history's first monocled pirate."
[i]~George Sanders

[/i]Harold and Kumar was good fun. It probably wouldn't have been as fun if it weren't for the crowd, though.

Everyone was yelling out the usual stuff like "Yeah, Doogie Howser" and "Don't give up!" So at the end when Harold is in the elevator with Maria my friend yelled out "Tap it!" which got a few laughs. Then the woman in front of us turned around and said, "He can't hear you." So my friend yelled back, "YES HE CAN!" And the chick's boyfriend got mad and told my friend not to yell at her. Then he said, "You heard me, asshole." The funny thing was, my friend didn't hear him.

That chick pissed me off. It's a sneak preview (translation: for fans) of a movie about stoned guys going to White Castle. Did she expect pensive silence or something? If you're going to a movie marketed at stoned teenagers who like to yell stuff, don't get upset when they do just that.

~Katie~
[/size]

King Arthur
King Arthur(2004)
½

I had fun at this movie, mainly because my friends and I had a lot of inside jokes that really worked with this film. But Iwas kind of bored, and my mind was racing. Here are the things I thought, mostly in order.

[list] [*]Oh, why are they yelling like that? [*]That guy looks like Sean Connery [*]It IS Sean Connery! [*]Wait, I was wrong, it's not. [*]Hmmm, Lancelot is like the man version of Orlando Bloom. [*]Cut his head off, Clive. [*]What's that guy's deal? [*]Why does that guy look like Christian Bale? [*]Cold. [*]What time is it? [*]Very cold indeed. [*]I know that guy from something. [*]Hmm, snow. Cold. [*]Who is that guy? [*]Why is that guy a fat version of that other guy? [*]Oh! That's the guy from SLC Punk! [*]Is that Geoffrey Rush? [*]There's a movie on there! [*]No, it's Stellan Skarsgard. [*]This movie needs more Merlin. [*]Why is Stellan Sarsgard talking like he's from Texas? [*]No wonder Kiera Knightley looked like a cancer patient in the stills. [*]Where'd that guy come from? [*]All the men are so pretty..... [*]My heart will go on and on....... [*]Why is Stellan Skarsgard trying to look like Geoffrey Rush? [*]Please give me more Steven Dillane. [*]What time is it? [*]This coke tastes like water. [*]Clive, you deserve better than Keira Knightley. [*]What am I saying? You deserve better than this movie. [*]I'm tired. [*]I wonder if swords are compensation for something. [*]Lancelot likes to watch. [*]It's like that episode of Seinfeld! [*]Go, Mordecai! [*]Hold on, I'm confused. [*]Seriously, what time is it? [*]That's a lot of smoke... [*]What's with the fire? Can't Hollywood make one movie that doesn't give me a heart attack? [*]I bet it hurts to duck tape your boobs like that. [*]Clive's head dress is pretty. [*]Who photoshopped Kiera Knightley's head to an 8 year old's body? [*]I need a better coke. [*]That bird better shit on that guy's head [*]Predictable.... [*]Yay, Merlin!!!! [*]Okay, sleepy time. [/list]
Pretty much. Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go strategically place plastic army men behind certain object of the house. Good evening.

Cradle Will Rock

[u]Best Picture[/u]
[b]Alexander
[i]The Aviator[/i]
Closer
Finding Neverland
Vanity Fair[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]Proof, The Life Aquatic, The Phantom of the Opera[/b]
At this point (you know, the point where we don't actually know much about the pictures) it would be stupid to say The Aviator isn't the best bet. It's a huge story of old Hollywood, and Oscar should love it. Advanced reviews of Closer say it's nothing short of incredible, and it may surpass Garden State as the biggest indie of the year. Alexander could be great or really suck (I have a feeling it may be the latter) but it's an historical epic, so I'm not counting it out at this point. The Finding Neverland trailer is pure oscar bait, and it's a biopic with a great cast. Vanity Fair, aside from having a great cast, is classic oscar fair. Proof could squeeze in there if it's really good, but advanced word is that it's not so great. If The Life Aquatic can overcome quirkiness and coast on Bill Murray's newfound star power, it could garner a nod. The Phantom of the Opera is following the recent musical craze at the oscars, but adaptaing something so well-loved is a gamble, and it's starring two stars who have yet to make it big.

[u]Best Actor[/u]
Jim Carrey, [b]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/b]
[i]Johnny Depp, [b]Finding Neverland[/b][/i]
Leonardo DiCaprio, [b]The Aviator[/b]
Jude Law, [b]Closer[/b]
Bill Murray, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Tom Hanks, [b]The Terminal[/b]; Tom Cruise, [b]Collateral[/b]; Colin Farrel, [b]A Home at the End of the World[/b]
Jim Carrey recieved rave reviews for his touching turn in Eternal Sunshine, and he's an actor who hasn't even recieved his due in nominations, so this is looking like his year to finally get some academy respect. Depp seems to be the fortrunner at this point. He's playing a loved writer in a biopic, and he has an accent. DiCaprio will ride The Aviator's success to nomination. Jude Law is supposedly fantastic in Closer, and it's a big year for him film-wise. Bill Murray will probably ride Oscar's love from last year to a nomination, but Oscar has shown time and time again that they aren't big on quirky comedy. Hanks has recieved great reviews recently for the Terminal, but it's summer release and less than glowing critical reception will hinder his chances. Cruise is always great when playing assholes, and Michael Mann always gets the best performances from his leading men, but the film doesn't look oscar-friendly. Colin Farrel will probably split his vote between his supposedly great performance in the supposedly less than great A Home at the End of the World and his epic portrayl of Alexander.


[u]Best Actress[/u]
Joan Allen, [b]The Upside of Anger[/b]
Gwenyth Paltrow, [b]Proof[/b]
[i]Kate Winslet, [b]Finding Neverland[/b][/i]
Reese Witherspoon,[b] Vanity Fair[/b]
Naomi Watts, [b]We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Renee Zellweger, [b]Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason[/b]; Nicole Kidman,[b] Dogville[/b]; Samantha Morton, [b]The Libertine[/b]
Oscar likes Joan Allen, if the movie turns out even halfway good, she should get recognition. Paltrow is apparently the best thing about Proof. Winslet will be coming off a huge year with both Neverland and Sunshine, and the Academy won't be able to ignore her. She'll probably nab the nod for the more oscar-friendly film, and since she's wya overdue, she'll probably win this year, finally. Reese Witherspoon will hopefully put her talent to good use in a serious turn in Vanity Fair. She looks great in the trailer. Watts will hopefully ride last year's oscar love to another nom for another little film. Buzz from Sundance was that she was great, but she's also got a lot of films coming out, so she may get a nom in supporting for Stay or The Assassination of Richard Nixon. Zellweger should be in the race, considering The Edge of Reason is even goofier than the first. Kidman has been getting early oscar buzz for Dogville, but it had such an early release and was met with such mixed reactions I'm not betting on a nomination. Morton may surprise again if The Libertine actually gets released this year.
[u]
Best Supporting Actor[/u]
Jim Broadbent, [b]Vanity Fair[/b]
Morgan Freeman, [b]An Unfinished Life[/b]
Ryan Gosling, [b]Stay[/b]
Anthony Hopkins, [b]Proof[/b]
[i]Clive Owen, [b]Closer[/b][/i]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Peter Sarsgaard, [b]Garden State[/b]; Don Cheadle, [b]Crash[/b]; Willem Dafoe, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
Vanity Fair's supporting cast is so huge it could be anybody. I think VF will definitely score a nomination in this category, but I really don't know who for. If James Purefoy is as good as he looks in the trailer, he could nab it instead of oscar veteran Broadbent. Morgan Freeman has been so overlooked that it seems impossible he won't get it for this much buzzed about film. Gosling is one of the finest young actors working, and apparently his work in The Notebook is great, and even though that film probably won't get oscar love, it may help his chances for Stay. Hopkins could split it between Alexander and Proof. If he has great father-daughter chemistry with Paltrow, he'll get it for Proof. Clive Owen apparently owns Closer. I find it hard to believe the Academy will ovelook Garden State in the major categories, and Sarsgaard just seems the most likely nominee. The trailer montage for Crash was great, and Cheadle is so under rated, that hopefull he'll find himself in the race. I have no idea how big Dafoe's role in Aquatic is, but come on. It's WILLEM DAFOE.
[u]
Best Supporting Actress[/u]
[i]Cate Blanchett, [b]The Aviator[/b][/i]
Hope Davis, [b]Proof[/b]
Laura Dern, [b]We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
Laura Linney, [b]Kinsey[/b]
Natalie Portman, [b]Closer[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Thandie Newton, [b]Crash[/b]; Anjelica Huston, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]; Evan Rachel Wood, [b]The Upside of Anger[/b]; Naomi Watts, [b]Stay[/b]
Blanchett is playing a loved Hollywood icon, and from the few clips we see of her in the trailers, she looks great. Plus, she's overdue for a win. Hope Davis was a hopeful last year for American Splendor, and hopefull that breakout role will help her get a nomination for Proof. There was strong buzz for Dern at Sundance, and it's been years since she's had an acclaimed performance. Oscar loves a comeback. Linney is alwso an often overlooked actress, and this juicy role may get her another nod. Portman's looking to have a great year with Closer and Garden State, but Closer is apparently a surprising change of pace for Portman, and the buzz for her is great. Newton looked fantastic in the Crash montage. I'm not sure about the roles in Aquatic, but one should never count out Anjelica Huston. Evan Rachel Wood came so close to getting a nod last year (damn you, Keisha Castle Hughes) and if she's half as good in Upside of Anger as she was in Thirteen, she'll definitely be in the race.

[u]Best Director[/u]
Michael Mann, [b]Collateral[/b]
Mira Nair, [b]Vanity Fair[/b]
Mike Nichols, [b]Closer[/b]
[i]Martin Scorsese, [b]The Aviator[/b][/i]
Oliver Stone, [b]Alexander[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Zach Braff, [b]Garden State[/b]; John Madden, [b]Proof[/b]; Paul Haggis, [b]Crash[/b]; Wes Anderson, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
This is probably the category that Collateral will get some love in. Vanity Fair is a huge production, and I just don't see how Nair woulnd't get a nom. Mike Nichols should ride the Closer high to a nod. But it's looking like it going to be Scorsese's year. He's never won an oscar, and this film looks fantastic. It should finally win him his gold. I'm not sure how long I'm going to keep Stone on the list, because, like I said, I have a gut feeling that Alexander is going to suck. Braff could get indie love for Garden State. If Proof is good, Madden could get his first nom since Shakespeare in Love, but advanced word isn't so hot. If Crash get good reviews Haggis could be looking at a breakthrough nomination. Anderson is always a possibility, but it seems that Aquatic will get more love for it's screenplay
[u]
Best Original Screenplay[/u]
[b]The Aviator
[i]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/i]
Garden State
I Heart Huckabees
The Life Aquatic[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]Stay, Crash, Collateral, Spanglish[/b]
The Aviator will probably get a nod just for being the Best Picture frontrunner. Eternal Sunshine not only had a fantastic screenplay, but also a huge amount of critical love. This should be Kaufman's year. Garden State was THE Sundance hit, but with Closer looking to be the indie fave this year, Garden State will probably get it's love here. It also has a rather large chance of beating out Sunshine. I Heart Huckabees should be just weird enough to get what "look, we're hip" nomination. Wes Anderson is brilliant. How could Aquatic not get some love. I took Stay off the list because I got weary do to the script for Troy. But Benioff's brilliant 25th Hour keeps Stay in the running. Crash seems to be the character drama of the year. Collateral is a possibility, just judging by the dialogue in the trailer. And the lighthearted Spanglish will probably be in the running, too.
[u]
Best Adapted Screenplay[/u]
[b]Closer
Finding Neverland
Proof
Vanity Fair
We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]A Home at the End of the World, Phantom of the Opera, Ladies in Lavender[/b]
With Closer looking to be the indie darling, this should be an easy win. Finding Neverland will probably nab a nod if it gets a BP nod. Proof will probably land a nod here even if the movie is mediocre, just because of the pedigree of the talent. Vanity Fair is a classic novel and if it's any good at all it's should be a guarenteed nomination. We Don't Live Here Anymore will hopefull follow in the footsteps of In the Bedroom and grab a nomination. A Home at the Endof the World's buzz isn't so hot. Phantom of the Opera is a risky move, and Ladies in Lavender's buzz dropped fast.

Dangerous Beauty

[u]Best Picture[/u]
[b]Alexander
[i]The Aviator[/i]
Closer
Finding Neverland
Vanity Fair[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]Proof, The Life Aquatic, The Phantom of the Opera[/b]
At this point (you know, the point where we don't actually know much about the pictures) it would be stupid to say The Aviator isn't the best bet. It's a huge story of old Hollywood, and Oscar should love it. Advanced reviews of Closer say it's nothing short of incredible, and it may surpass Garden State as the biggest indie of the year. Alexander could be great or really suck (I have a feeling it may be the latter) but it's an historical epic, so I'm not counting it out at this point. The Finding Neverland trailer is pure oscar bait, and it's a biopic with a great cast. Vanity Fair, aside from having a great cast, is classic oscar fair. Proof could squeeze in there if it's really good, but advanced word is that it's not so great. If The Life Aquatic can overcome quirkiness and coast on Bill Murray's newfound star power, it could garner a nod. The Phantom of the Opera is following the recent musical craze at the oscars, but adaptaing something so well-loved is a gamble, and it's starring two stars who have yet to make it big.

[u]Best Actor[/u]
Jim Carrey, [b]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/b]
[i]Johnny Depp, [b]Finding Neverland[/b][/i]
Leonardo DiCaprio, [b]The Aviator[/b]
Jude Law, [b]Closer[/b]
Bill Murray, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Tom Hanks, [b]The Terminal[/b]; Tom Cruise, [b]Collateral[/b]; Colin Farrel, [b]A Home at the End of the World[/b]
Jim Carrey recieved rave reviews for his touching turn in Eternal Sunshine, and he's an actor who hasn't even recieved his due in nominations, so this is looking like his year to finally get some academy respect. Depp seems to be the fortrunner at this point. He's playing a loved writer in a biopic, and he has an accent. DiCaprio will ride The Aviator's success to nomination. Jude Law is supposedly fantastic in Closer, and it's a big year for him film-wise. Bill Murray will probably ride Oscar's love from last year to a nomination, but Oscar has shown time and time again that they aren't big on quirky comedy. Hanks has recieved great reviews recently for the Terminal, but it's summer release and less than glowing critical reception will hinder his chances. Cruise is always great when playing assholes, and Michael Mann always gets the best performances from his leading men, but the film doesn't look oscar-friendly. Colin Farrel will probably split his vote between his supposedly great performance in the supposedly less than great A Home at the End of the World and his epic portrayl of Alexander.


[u]Best Actress[/u]
Joan Allen, [b]The Upside of Anger[/b]
Gwenyth Paltrow, [b]Proof[/b]
[i]Kate Winslet, [b]Finding Neverland[/b][/i]
Reese Witherspoon,[b] Vanity Fair[/b]
Naomi Watts, [b]We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Renee Zellweger, [b]Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason[/b]; Nicole Kidman,[b] Dogville[/b]; Samantha Morton, [b]The Libertine[/b]
Oscar likes Joan Allen, if the movie turns out even halfway good, she should get recognition. Paltrow is apparently the best thing about Proof. Winslet will be coming off a huge year with both Neverland and Sunshine, and the Academy won't be able to ignore her. She'll probably nab the nod for the more oscar-friendly film, and since she's wya overdue, she'll probably win this year, finally. Reese Witherspoon will hopefully put her talent to good use in a serious turn in Vanity Fair. She looks great in the trailer. Watts will hopefully ride last year's oscar love to another nom for another little film. Buzz from Sundance was that she was great, but she's also got a lot of films coming out, so she may get a nom in supporting for Stay or The Assassination of Richard Nixon. Zellweger should be in the race, considering The Edge of Reason is even goofier than the first. Kidman has been getting early oscar buzz for Dogville, but it had such an early release and was met with such mixed reactions I'm not betting on a nomination. Morton may surprise again if The Libertine actually gets released this year.
[u]
Best Supporting Actor[/u]
Jim Broadbent, [b]Vanity Fair[/b]
Morgan Freeman, [b]An Unfinished Life[/b]
Ryan Gosling, [b]Stay[/b]
Anthony Hopkins, [b]Proof[/b]
[i]Clive Owen, [b]Closer[/b][/i]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Peter Sarsgaard, [b]Garden State[/b]; Don Cheadle, [b]Crash[/b]; Willem Dafoe, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
Vanity Fair's supporting cast is so huge it could be anybody. I think VF will definitely score a nomination in this category, but I really don't know who for. If James Purefoy is as good as he looks in the trailer, he could nab it instead of oscar veteran Broadbent. Morgan Freeman has been so overlooked that it seems impossible he won't get it for this much buzzed about film. Gosling is one of the finest young actors working, and apparently his work in The Notebook is great, and even though that film probably won't get oscar love, it may help his chances for Stay. Hopkins could split it between Alexander and Proof. If he has great father-daughter chemistry with Paltrow, he'll get it for Proof. Clive Owen apparently owns Closer. I find it hard to believe the Academy will ovelook Garden State in the major categories, and Sarsgaard just seems the most likely nominee. The trailer montage for Crash was great, and Cheadle is so under rated, that hopefull he'll find himself in the race. I have no idea how big Dafoe's role in Aquatic is, but come on. It's WILLEM DAFOE.
[u]
Best Supporting Actress[/u]
[i]Cate Blanchett, [b]The Aviator[/b][/i]
Hope Davis, [b]Proof[/b]
Laura Dern, [b]We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
Laura Linney, [b]Kinsey[/b]
Natalie Portman, [b]Closer[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Thandie Newton, [b]Crash[/b]; Anjelica Huston, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]; Evan Rachel Wood, [b]The Upside of Anger[/b]; Naomi Watts, [b]Stay[/b]
Blanchett is playing a loved Hollywood icon, and from the few clips we see of her in the trailers, she looks great. Plus, she's overdue for a win. Hope Davis was a hopeful last year for American Splendor, and hopefull that breakout role will help her get a nomination for Proof. There was strong buzz for Dern at Sundance, and it's been years since she's had an acclaimed performance. Oscar loves a comeback. Linney is alwso an often overlooked actress, and this juicy role may get her another nod. Portman's looking to have a great year with Closer and Garden State, but Closer is apparently a surprising change of pace for Portman, and the buzz for her is great. Newton looked fantastic in the Crash montage. I'm not sure about the roles in Aquatic, but one should never count out Anjelica Huston. Evan Rachel Wood came so close to getting a nod last year (damn you, Keisha Castle Hughes) and if she's half as good in Upside of Anger as she was in Thirteen, she'll definitely be in the race.

[u]Best Director[/u]
Michael Mann, [b]Collateral[/b]
Mira Nair, [b]Vanity Fair[/b]
Mike Nichols, [b]Closer[/b]
[i]Martin Scorsese, [b]The Aviator[/b][/i]
Oliver Stone, [b]Alexander[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: Zach Braff, [b]Garden State[/b]; John Madden, [b]Proof[/b]; Paul Haggis, [b]Crash[/b]; Wes Anderson, [b]The Life Aquatic[/b]
This is probably the category that Collateral will get some love in. Vanity Fair is a huge production, and I just don't see how Nair woulnd't get a nom. Mike Nichols should ride the Closer high to a nod. But it's looking like it going to be Scorsese's year. He's never won an oscar, and this film looks fantastic. It should finally win him his gold. I'm not sure how long I'm going to keep Stone on the list, because, like I said, I have a gut feeling that Alexander is going to suck. Braff could get indie love for Garden State. If Proof is good, Madden could get his first nom since Shakespeare in Love, but advanced word isn't so hot. If Crash get good reviews Haggis could be looking at a breakthrough nomination. Anderson is always a possibility, but it seems that Aquatic will get more love for it's screenplay
[u]
Best Original Screenplay[/u]
[b]The Aviator
[i]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/i]
Garden State
I Heart Huckabees
The Life Aquatic[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]Stay, Crash, Collateral, Spanglish[/b]
The Aviator will probably get a nod just for being the Best Picture frontrunner. Eternal Sunshine not only had a fantastic screenplay, but also a huge amount of critical love. This should be Kaufman's year. Garden State was THE Sundance hit, but with Closer looking to be the indie fave this year, Garden State will probably get it's love here. It also has a rather large chance of beating out Sunshine. I Heart Huckabees should be just weird enough to get what "look, we're hip" nomination. Wes Anderson is brilliant. How could Aquatic not get some love. I took Stay off the list because I got weary do to the script for Troy. But Benioff's brilliant 25th Hour keeps Stay in the running. Crash seems to be the character drama of the year. Collateral is a possibility, just judging by the dialogue in the trailer. And the lighthearted Spanglish will probably be in the running, too.
[u]
Best Adapted Screenplay[/u]
[b]Closer
Finding Neverland
Proof
Vanity Fair
We Don't Live Here Anymore[/b]
[u]Don't Count Out[/u]: [b]A Home at the End of the World, Phantom of the Opera, Ladies in Lavender[/b]
With Closer looking to be the indie darling, this should be an easy win. Finding Neverland will probably nab a nod if it gets a BP nod. Proof will probably land a nod here even if the movie is mediocre, just because of the pedigree of the talent. Vanity Fair is a classic novel and if it's any good at all it's should be a guarenteed nomination. We Don't Live Here Anymore will hopefull follow in the footsteps of In the Bedroom and grab a nomination. A Home at the Endof the World's buzz isn't so hot. Phantom of the Opera is a risky move, and Ladies in Lavender's buzz dropped fast.

The Notebook
The Notebook(2004)

I've always been a crier at emotional films. But I've never, EVER sobbed the way I did at The Notebook. (Well, at least not in public. I sob every time I watch Cinema Paradiso, but in the actual theater I can usually keep it under control) Holy Lord! I was mortified, my mom was embarassed, but I could not stop.

Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

[font=Verdana][b]Quote of the Day[/b]
Hearts live by being wounded.
[i]~Oscar Wilde

[/i][b]and one that's a bit more hopeful:[/b]

[/font] [font=Verdana]Sadness flies away on the wings of time.
[i]~Jean De La Fontaine[/i]
[/font]

The Dreamers
The Dreamers(2004)

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b][color=black]I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
[i]
~William Butler Yeats
[/i][/color]

Saved!
Saved!(2004)

This Battle of the Hotties business has gotten out of hand. Hey, people? IT'S JUST AN INTERNET BATTLE. Does it really matter if your favorite celebrity wins? It doesn't matter to a lot of people, and if it does to you I suggest you stay the hell away from the Battles. I've been getting complaints from both sides all day. From the fangirls complaining that the seedlings were aliases and the seedlings complaining that they weren't being treated fairly. Guess which group had the decency to keep most of their complaining off the thread? I want to thank the people from both sides who didn't bitch about the way the battles were being run or the people who were voting. It was very gracious of you. But to those of you who think we should follow your rules just because you don't like the way things are run, then stay out of the battles. I really can't see why they'd be so important to you anyways. And because of your impertinent behavior, the thread has closed a day early. So whine all you want about how the voting wasn't fair or how the wrong man won, because it's your fault there won't be a chance to fix that. It would be very nice if in the coming rounds, the top 100 hot guys list voting, and next year's battle if we could all act like adults instead of whining children.

And I admit I got testy toward the end, too. But when you've put literally months into these battles and all you get is bitching about something in one round (just ignore the past three and a half rounds that went swimmingly, following the same rules) it kind of makes me a tad bit upset.

Once again I'd like to thank the people who were rational about this whole situation and kept their qualms to themselves. And thanks to Coffee? for a little guidance when it was needed.

Shadowlands
Shadowlands(1993)
½

[img]http://live.quizilla.com/user_images/E/etherkiss/1048725577_anderscopy.jpg[/img]

[img]http://live.quizilla.com/user_images/E/etherkiss/1048493399_Garbo2copy.jpg[/img]

Now I'm going to go back and answer truthfully.... :D

Wings of Desire
½

I think we all know how this feels:

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in an argument.
[i]~William G. McAdoo


[/i]

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

I got bored, so I did predictions for the Oscars. Yeah, I know it's only June, but like I said, I'm bored. The predicted winners are italicized.

[b]Best Picture[/b]
Alexander
[i]The Aviator[/i]
Closer
JM Barrie's Neverland
Vanity Fair

[b]Best Director[/b]
Wes Anderson, The Life Aquatic
Mira Nair, Vanity Fair
Mike Nichols, Closer
[i]Martin Scorsese, The Aviator[/i]
Oliver Stone, Alexander

[b]Best Actor[/b]
Jim Carrey, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
[i]Johnny Depp, JM Barries's Neverland[/i]
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Aviator
Kevin Kline, De-Lovely
Jude Law, Closer

[b]Best Actress[/b]
Gwyneth Paltrow, Proof
Julia Roberts, Closer
Kate Winslet, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
[i]Reese Witherspoon, Vanity Fair[/i]
Renee Zellweger, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
[b]
Best Supporting Actor[/b]
Jim Broadbent, Vanity Fair
Willem Dafoe, The Life Aquatic
Ryan Gosling, Stay
[i]Anthony Hopkins, Alexander[/i]
Clive Owen, Closer

[b]Best Supporting Actress[/b]
[i]Cate Blanchett, The Aviator[/i]
Hope Davis, Proof
Natalie Portman, Closer
Sissy Spacek, A Home at the End of the World
Naomi Watts, Stay
[b]
Best Original Screenplay[/b]
The Aviator
[i]Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind[/i]
I Heart Huckabees
The Life Aquatic
Stay

[b]Best Adapted Screenplay [/b]
The Assassination of Richard Nixon
[i]Closer[/i]
Proof
A Home at the End of the World
Vanity Fair

EDIT: For AS, I took out Phantom of the Opera and put in Vanity Fair. I don't know what I was thinking.

Man, this year is going to kick so much ass for movies.

Notorious
Notorious(1946)

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]"[font=georgia, bookman old style, palatino linotype, book antiqua, palatino, trebuchet ms, helvetica, garamond, sans-serif, arial, verdana, avante garde, century gothic, comic sans ms, times, times new roman, serif]I am annoyed by individuals who are embarrassed by pauses in a conversation. To me, every conversational pause refreshes. "
[i]~George Sanders[/i]
[/font]

The Lady Vanishes
½

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]"[font=georgia, bookman old style, palatino linotype, book antiqua, palatino, trebuchet ms, helvetica, garamond, sans-serif, arial, verdana, avante garde, century gothic, comic sans ms, times, times new roman, serif]I am annoyed by individuals who are embarrassed by pauses in a conversation. To me, every conversational pause refreshes. "
[i]~George Sanders[/i]
[/font]

Clerks
Clerks(1994)

[b]Quote of the Day
[/b]"Music is the art which is most nigh to tears and memory."
[i]~Oscar Wilde[/i]

The Little Mermaid

I like Disney songs. A lot. So here's my list.:

1. Kiss the Girl, The Little Mermaid
2. Part of Your World, The Little Mermaid
3. Tale as Old as time, Beauty and the Beast
4. Can You Feel the Love Tonight, The Lion King
5. Be Our Guest, Beuty and the Beast
6. Be Prepared, The Lion King
7. A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes, Cinderella
8. Belle Repriise, Beuaty and the Beast
9. A Whole New World, Aladdin
10. We are Siamese, Lady and the Tramp
11. Everybody Wants to be a Cat, The Aristocats
12. Heavens Light/Hellfire, The Hunchback of Notre Dame
13. The Unbirthday Song, Alice in Wonderland
14. Some Day My Prince Will Come, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
15. So This is Love, Cinderella
16. Won't Say I'm in Love, Hercules
17. Under the Sea, The Little Mermaid
18. Something There, Beauty and the Beast
19. Belle, Beauty and the Beast
20. Go the Distance, Hercules

And then I added up the points to see which Disney movie had the best songs. I gave #1 20 points and #20 1 point. You get the point (haha, points, get the point. Hahahahaha.....I kill myself) and then I added them for each movie and the one with the most has the best songs.

Little Mermaid: 43
Beauty and the Beast: 52
The Lion King: 30
Cinderella: 14
Aladdin: 12
The Lady and the Tramp: 11
the AristocatsL 10
The Hunchback of Notre Dame: 9
Alice in Wonderland: 8
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: 7
Hercules: 7

So it would look like this:

1. Beauty and the Beast
2. The Little Mermaid
3. The Lion King
4. Cinderella
5. Aladdin

Beauty and the Beast

I like Disney songs. A lot. So here's my list.:

1. Kiss the Girl, The Little Mermaid
2. Part of Your World, The Little Mermaid
3. Tale as Old as time, Beauty and the Beast
4. Can You Feel the Love Tonight, The Lion King
5. Be Our Guest, Beuty and the Beast
6. Be Prepared, The Lion King
7. A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes, Cinderella
8. Belle Repriise, Beuaty and the Beast
9. A Whole New World, Aladdin
10. We are Siamese, Lady and the Tramp
11. Everybody Wants to be a Cat, The Aristocats
12. Heavens Light/Hellfire, The Hunchback of Notre Dame
13. The Unbirthday Song, Alice in Wonderland
14. Some Day My Prince Will Come, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
15. So This is Love, Cinderella
16. Won't Say I'm in Love, Hercules
17. Under the Sea, The Little Mermaid
18. Something There, Beauty and the Beast
19. Belle, Beauty and the Beast
20. Go the Distance, Hercules

And then I added up the points to see which Disney movie had the best songs. I gave #1 20 points and #20 1 point. You get the point (haha, points, get the point. Hahahahaha.....I kill myself) and then I added them for each movie and the one with the most has the best songs.

Little Mermaid: 43
Beauty and the Beast: 52
The Lion King: 30
Cinderella: 14
Aladdin: 12
The Lady and the Tramp: 11
the AristocatsL 10
The Hunchback of Notre Dame: 9
Alice in Wonderland: 8
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: 7
Hercules: 7

So it would look like this:

1. Beauty and the Beast
2. The Little Mermaid
3. The Lion King
4. Cinderella
5. Aladdin

Grand Hotel
Grand Hotel(1932)

Last night I got up to use the bathroom, and I tripped over my cat and hit my face on the doorway. Now I've got a bruise on my cheek.

I'm beginning to see striking similarities between my cat and the cats from Lady and the Tramp.

And I'm currently rating my top 100 films. I'm throwing some others I recently watched in the mix, too.

The Sweet Hereafter

Last night I got up to use the bathroom, and I tripped over my cat and hit my face on the doorway. Now I've got a bruise on my cheek.

I'm beginning to see striking similarities between my cat and the cats from Lady and the Tramp.

And I'm currently rating my top 100 films. I'm throwing some others I recently watched in the mix, too.

Twelve Monkeys (12 Monkeys)

Last night I got up to use the bathroom, and I tripped over my cat and hit my face on the doorway. Now I've got a bruise on my cheek.

I'm beginning to see striking similarities between my cat and the cats from Lady and the Tramp.

And I'm currently rating my top 100 films. I'm throwing some others I recently watched in the mix, too.

Mulholland Drive

Last night I got up to use the bathroom, and I tripped over my cat and hit my face on the doorway. Now I've got a bruise on my cheek.

I'm beginning to see striking similarities between my cat and the cats from Lady and the Tramp.

And I'm currently rating my top 100 films. I'm throwing some others I recently watched in the mix, too.

Rebecca
Rebecca(1940)

Last night I got up to use the bathroom, and I tripped over my cat and hit my face on the doorway. Now I've got a bruise on my cheek.

I'm beginning to see striking similarities between my cat and the cats from Lady and the Tramp.

And I'm currently rating my top 100 films. I'm throwing some others I recently watched in the mix, too.

Love Actually

[b]Quote Of the Day:[/b]
"Here's an important lesson from your Uncle Bill. Don't buy drugs. Become a pop star and they give you them for free." [i]~Bill Nighy, Love Actually[/i]

[b]WTF Moment of the Day:[/b]
None today, folks. Sorry.

Breakfast at Tiffany's

Quote of the Day: [i]Space Ghost....I think I'm pregnant. [/i][b]Brak[/b]
What-the-Fuck Moment of the Day: [i]Boomtown getting the boot. [/i][b]WHAT THE FUCK!?[/b]

Down With Love
½

Nothing to say really, so I'll just explain a few things:

Quote of the Day: Just a quote I encountered during the day that tickled my fancy.

What-the-Fuck Moment of the Day: something (most probably in the entertainment business) that made me go "WHAT THE FUCK!?"



Quote of the Day:[i] "A lot of people said I wouldn't make the grade. And let's face it: I haven't."[/i] [b]George Sanders[/b]

WTF Moment of the Day: [i]John Favreau's (sp?) weight in Elf. [/i][b]WHAT THE FUCK!?[/b]

~Katie~

All About Eve

All About Eve

Ah, my precious George Sanders. This film features the current object of my obsession in his finest role. I was scolded by a friend of mine who thinks she's a feminist but is really just an idiot for adoring someone as chauvinistic as Sanders, but his life was fasinating, and, after reading his autobiography, I know that he wasn't as much of a cad as her lead on.

Anyhoo, wonderful film which I love. While Sanders is clearly the stand out among the cast, everyone else is superb, especially Davis (obviously) as the egotistical actress Margo Channing.

~Katie~

The Last Time I Committed Suicide

I was invited to no parties. I was invited to no haunted houses. I was invited to no movie nights. I was invited to nothing. It kind of sucks. So it's going to be me, alone in my house, watching movies and eating candy like a huge loser.

To make things worse, I've been sick for awhile, so I go to make up some tests I missed, and neither of them are at the library. Grrrr........

At least I'm seeing Love Actually on Saturday. To bad it's with my mom....

~Katie~