Bigwig's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

Want-to-See Movies

This user has no Want to See movie selections yet.

Want-to-See TV

This user has no Want to See TV selections yet.

Rating History

Taking Lives
Taking Lives (2004)
11 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[i]Crash [/i]is an intense film, a whirlwind of characters and dramatic events spanning a day in Los Angeles. The Director, Paul Haggis, had to be inspired by Paul Thomas Anderson's [i]Magnolia[/i]. Both films have interconnecting stories with similar themes, both have a weather related quirk at the end, and both contain musical sequences filled with shots of characters reflecting on their lives.

[i]Crash's[/i] focus is on race, and how communication barriers and prejudices can often take complicated situation's to their breaking point. Don Cheadle is a black homicide detective, having an affair with his Latino partner (Jennifer Esposito). Matt Dillon is a racist white cop, frustrated with a sick father, who seems aware and resigned to his character flaws. Ryan Phillippe is Dillon's partner. A principled fellow, who finds out by the end of the film that perhaps his partner was correct in telling him, "You have no idea who you are."

Ludacris and Lorenz Tate are black carjackers, and offer up some of the film's most hilarious dialogue. Brendan Fraser is a logical white district attorney. His wife, played by Sandra Bullock, is a spoiled, prejudiced, frustrated housewife who is searching for answers as to why she is always angry.

I just realized that it will take forever to list all the characters and their relation to the story, so I'll just quit now, and point out that this is one of the film's flaws. There are so many plot lines, and so many conflicts, that the film fails to flesh each one out sufficiently. Another problem I had with [i]Crash[/i] is that there are an extraordinary amount of highly dramatic situations that arise, that tend to lure the viewer into remembering that they're watching a film, and in a gritty life drama, this can only detract from the underlying message.

Despite this, I'm still giving the film 9/10, because it is very powerful. There are several scenes that have you on the edge of your seat. There are terrific performances from the large cast. And the film doesn't have a preachy air, sometimes difficult to acheive when exploring a subject like race.

[i]Magnolia[/i] is an excellent film to compare with [i]Crash[/i]. Paul Thomas Anderson's film has all of the traits of Paul Haggis', but none of the drawbacks. If you haven't seen either, watch them both, and see for yourself.

Side note: Bahar Soomekh, who plays a Persian shopkeepers daughter, is smoking fucking hot.




I remember both Ebert and Roeper giving two thumbs up to [i]Taking Lives[/i], so I decided to watch it on HBO Thursday night. Who doesn't love a well-made serial killer thriller? I think they're great. Unfortunately, [i]Taking Lives[/i] isn't well-made. It's not even average-made.

Although she's not a personal favorite, Angelina Jolie is widely considered by men and women to be one of the sexiest women alive. The lips, the eyes, the attitude. No matter how objective we try to be, we recognize her as a sex symbol. A wild, bad girl. Which partly makes this role horrible for her. She was 29 years old when [i]Taking Lives[/i] was released, yet her character is a brilliant veteran, who seems to have that innate Hollywood Cop genius ability to dissect every little thing a serial killer does, and paint the perfect profile. The other cops are mere props, in the scenes to dumbly nod at her wisdom, and make mistakes so she can correct them. Anybody who knows a dash about law enforcement would realize that a 29 year old rarely makes Detective, let alone cult status as a super investigator among her peers.

I can picture the Hollywood executives getting together.

Okay, let's make a serial killer picture.

Great. How about Angelina Jolie as the star cop? She's hot. People like her.

Fine. Let's also get a sex symbol for the woman. How about Oliver Martinez?

An American police Lt. with a French accent? Has one ever existed?

Who cares? Women dig him.

Who can play the obvious suspect? Kiefer Sutherland, of course.

Okay, add a big plot twist. Good. A showdown ending. Okay. Now, make sure the real killer looks like a harmless dope throughout the film. Fantastic.

Make sure to make Jolie the primary figure in the movie poster. Make her look scared. People enjoy seeing scared white women on movie posters. Make sure the light falls just right on her lips so that men can fantasize about sticking their engorged member where Brad Pitt's goes four times daily. Edit. Package. Ship.

2/10

Crash
Crash (2004)
11 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[i]Crash [/i]is an intense film, a whirlwind of characters and dramatic events spanning a day in Los Angeles. The Director, Paul Haggis, had to be inspired by Paul Thomas Anderson's [i]Magnolia[/i]. Both films have interconnecting stories with similar themes, both have a weather related quirk at the end, and both contain musical sequences filled with shots of characters reflecting on their lives.

[i]Crash's[/i] focus is on race, and how communication barriers and prejudices can often take complicated situation's to their breaking point. Don Cheadle is a black homicide detective, having an affair with his Latino partner (Jennifer Esposito). Matt Dillon is a racist white cop, frustrated with a sick father, who seems aware and resigned to his character flaws. Ryan Phillippe is Dillon's partner. A principled fellow, who finds out by the end of the film that perhaps his partner was correct in telling him, "You have no idea who you are."

Ludacris and Lorenz Tate are black carjackers, and offer up some of the film's most hilarious dialogue. Brendan Fraser is a logical white district attorney. His wife, played by Sandra Bullock, is a spoiled, prejudiced, frustrated housewife who is searching for answers as to why she is always angry.

I just realized that it will take forever to list all the characters and their relation to the story, so I'll just quit now, and point out that this is one of the film's flaws. There are so many plot lines, and so many conflicts, that the film fails to flesh each one out sufficiently. Another problem I had with [i]Crash[/i] is that there are an extraordinary amount of highly dramatic situations that arise, that tend to lure the viewer into remembering that they're watching a film, and in a gritty life drama, this can only detract from the underlying message.

Despite this, I'm still giving the film 9/10, because it is very powerful. There are several scenes that have you on the edge of your seat. There are terrific performances from the large cast. And the film doesn't have a preachy air, sometimes difficult to acheive when exploring a subject like race.

[i]Magnolia[/i] is an excellent film to compare with [i]Crash[/i]. Paul Thomas Anderson's film has all of the traits of Paul Haggis', but none of the drawbacks. If you haven't seen either, watch them both, and see for yourself.

Side note: Bahar Soomekh, who plays a Persian shopkeepers daughter, is smoking fucking hot.




I remember both Ebert and Roeper giving two thumbs up to [i]Taking Lives[/i], so I decided to watch it on HBO Thursday night. Who doesn't love a well-made serial killer thriller? I think they're great. Unfortunately, [i]Taking Lives[/i] isn't well-made. It's not even average-made.

Although she's not a personal favorite, Angelina Jolie is widely considered by men and women to be one of the sexiest women alive. The lips, the eyes, the attitude. No matter how objective we try to be, we recognize her as a sex symbol. A wild, bad girl. Which partly makes this role horrible for her. She was 29 years old when [i]Taking Lives[/i] was released, yet her character is a brilliant veteran, who seems to have that innate Hollywood Cop genius ability to dissect every little thing a serial killer does, and paint the perfect profile. The other cops are mere props, in the scenes to dumbly nod at her wisdom, and make mistakes so she can correct them. Anybody who knows a dash about law enforcement would realize that a 29 year old rarely makes Detective, let alone cult status as a super investigator among her peers.

I can picture the Hollywood executives getting together.

Okay, let's make a serial killer picture.

Great. How about Angelina Jolie as the star cop? She's hot. People like her.

Fine. Let's also get a sex symbol for the woman. How about Oliver Martinez?

An American police Lt. with a French accent? Has one ever existed?

Who cares? Women dig him.

Who can play the obvious suspect? Kiefer Sutherland, of course.

Okay, add a big plot twist. Good. A showdown ending. Okay. Now, make sure the real killer looks like a harmless dope throughout the film. Fantastic.

Make sure to make Jolie the primary figure in the movie poster. Make her look scared. People enjoy seeing scared white women on movie posters. Make sure the light falls just right on her lips so that men can fantasize about sticking their engorged member where Brad Pitt's goes four times daily. Edit. Package. Ship.

2/10

Welcome to Death Row
12 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[i]The Fog of War[/i] should be required viewing for everyone in the Bush administration. Unfortunately, they would probably look at Robert McNamara as someone who has softened with age, and lost his true perspective. They would be deluded, of course.

McNamara does quite a bold thing in Errol Morris' film. It's almost a type of confession. As if he is attempting to absolve himself of mistakes that he made. Unlike when you and I screw up, McNamara's mistakes killed people. He's nothing if not genuine.

Michael Moore can learn from this film. It's more effective than F9/11, and far better technically. Morris is the greatest documentary filmmaker to ever live, and Moore has got a long way to go just to sniff his jock.

Finally, is it ironic or sad that liberals, libertarians, and true conservatives have reached a point where we might [i]wish[/i] Robert McNamara was the current SecDef?


[i]Welcome to Death Row[/i] is an interesting look at the record label (Death Row Records) and it's notorious associates (Shug Knight, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Tupac Shakur, Harrio, etc.). The film is extremely well directed and edited, and is an absorbing watch. I found it a bit incomplete, however, because it treated Shakur's murder as more of an afterthought. To me, that's when the story really gets interesting.

I think the film also shows these entertainers and record people in a different light. They are thoughtful, smart artists who love their craft. A far cry from the general public perception.

This film is incredibly underwatched. By comparison, it has 1/30 the votes on IMDB that [i]The Fog of War[/i] has, and that film is often considered 'missed.'


[i]Winged Migration[/i] is the bird movie where the French dude figured out how to photograph birds in flight. It's beatiful, and I enjoyed it immensely (watched it twice last night). But, in the end, it's 100 minutes of birds flying, so it only gets 6/10.