Devontate's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

Captain America: The Winter Soldier
2 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Before I go into reviewing Marvel's newest entry, let me just start off by saying I'm not a die hard fan. "Um... okay and what exactly does Bruce Willis' series have anything to do with 'The Avengers'" you ask? Nothing. What I mean to say is- "The Avengers," although beloved by many and even hailed as the best comic book movie ever made by some, was merely an astonishment to me that such an enterprise could be pulled off. Entertaining in bits (cue applause for Robert Downey Jr's reliable chemistry with anyone thrown his way) and littered with special effects, what it all came down to, at least for me, was a summer blockbuster that exceeded my expectations. The "Thor," "Captain America: The First Avenger," and "The Incredible Hulk" stand-alones did fairly little for me to anticipate greatness from a joint effort, but at least laid out a foundation for one that could be understood once combined. Having said that, the first "Iron Man" picture is my favorite Marvel production to date. Presenting a sort of anti-hero whose bad streaks were met with good intention, Robert Downey Jr's interpretation of Tony Stark was both welcomed and a saving grace to the standard super hero movie. It's sequels were more of the same, a sentiment I was less supportive of with "Iron Man 2," but even then, "Iron Man 3" became my second favorite film out of the Marvel cannon. Forgive me for the excessive prologue leading into my review of "The Winter Soldier," but it's a necessary one I think, needed to highlight my complete surprise that a sequel to a film that did very little for me in the first place, could knock "Iron Man" off my top spot. "The First Avenger" had a potential squandered by a script with little story-telling stride and was often translated as boredom by a director who's been there and done that (see Joe Johnston's superior "The Rocketeer" for authentic B-movie pulp). It's follow up is a competant action thriller with unexpected emotional depths that kept my attention unlike anything yet produced by Marvel studios. For being not only a sequel, but a piece to an expanding franchise puzzle, "The Winter Soldier" works well on its own merits. If you haven't seen the first Captain America film, the second one does a reasonable job of filling in the blanks thanks to a section of the Smithsonian Museum Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) frequents that elaborates on the laborious history represented in "The First Avenger." The sequel's story, although taking place in a far-fetched world, is one that's just seconds away from a reality we currently find ourselves in as Americans. After an intel-reconnaissance mission places Nick Fury under S.H.I.E.L.D.'s microscope, Captain America is summoned to filter out the once trusted agency's corruptive moles, who are bent on holding the world hostage with an operation that will eliminate millions of committing crimes based on prediction (a la "Minority Report"). There's so much I went into "The Winter Soldier" not knowing, that I wont elaborate on to save those of you like me from having a ruined experience. The fact that a movie like this has the ability to surprise is a notion I'm grateful for still exists because boy are these ventures becoming predictable. "The Winter Soldier," while still containing its share of super hero movie cliches, is also this human, political thriller, mystery, adventure made all the more accessible by the acting-chops of Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson, Robert Redford, and Anthony Mackie. These actors, guided by the knowing hands of directing team Anthony and Joe Russo, give it there all to a story that gives us everything anyone could ever want from a comic book flick: a memorable, pre-summer blockbuster that defies conventions by being more than one. "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" is one of the most entertaining theatrical experiences I haven't been ashamed of having in quite some time. SCORE: A

Noah
Noah (2014)
2 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

As a student of a Christian education for over a decade, going into "Noah," I was expecting yet another Sunday school retread (especially going into it ON a Sunday) albeit, one given a "Lord of the Ring"-style budget. A benefit of the doubt was granted, however, when positive reviews from critics started flooding (no pun intended) rotten tomatoes. "Maybe," I thought, "maybe the critics are right like they always are." And it's with that mindset that I exited the theater knowing better than to trust people who get paid to support prestigious filmmaker's mistakes- like Darren Aronofsky's "Noah." I don't care if you're an atheist or a Buddhist, the story of Noah's Ark is pretty universally known. After years of dealing with man's wickedness, God (referred to as "The Creator" here like it's the Matrix instead of the Old Testament) sends Noah a message to begin building a vessel that will save two of each animal and his own family from an annihilating flood. In Darren Aronofsky's version, the story includes a battle that pits a descendant of Cain (the brother who kills Abel) against Noah's army of Watcher's (fallen angels who take the form of giant rock monsters that are animated in a "Never Ending Story" fashion) and a finale that turns the Ark into The Overlook Hotel from "The Shining." The problem with "Noah" is not the acting- all contributors from Russell Crowe to Emma Watson shed their tears on cue and yell when necessary- it's the vision of the story. It tries to be a fantasy, disaster, and Bible movie all at once and they never work together. Unlike Quentin Tarantino's "Inglorious Basterds," "Noah" follows its source material pretty well (making all battle scenes designed to stop the Ark's take off pointless) and incorporates stupid conceptions that slow the story down from its inevitable outcome instead of taking us someplace new (or interesting). To put it mildly, "Noah" is one of the biggest wastes of money Hollywood has churned out in quite some time and the fact that it's ring leader is Darren Aronofsky makes it's failure even more epic than its budget. After giving us masterpieces like "Requiem for a Dream," "The Fountain," "The Wrestler," and "Black Swan," Aronofsky has taken his first shit on celluloid in his career and packaged it as a blockbuster. If there's a saving grace to the bizarre interpretation of the Old Testament story, it's Anthony Hopkins who plays Noah's grandfather. His character's obsession with berries is one of the film's more interesting distractions and quite frankly, one that ends right when the film should have (roughly an hour in). In the end, "Noah" may have been able to make his boat float, but Aronofsky historically sinks it with a dreary, uninteresting vision that has already claimed a top spot in my list of worst films of 2014. SCORE: D+

Revolutionary Road
7 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[b]Revolutionary Road[/b]
If you are stuck in a rut, trying to figure out a way to break up with your boyfriend/girlfriend this Valentines Day, take them on a movie date to watch "Revolutionary Road." You're guaranteed to walk into the theater as a couple and leave single. In James Cameron's "Titanic," we find out that Sam Mendes' "Revolutionary Road" is the reason why Rose (Kate Winslet) let go of Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and allowed him to drown into the mouths of hungry sharks. This is a penetrating, devastating film that's in no way entertaining to watch. In fact, it accomplishes the same type of cringe one gets from watching the "Saw" films, only through a verbal medium, rather than a rib-cage-exploding medium. As the story of a much-too-young, disillusioned couple who find themselves trapped in lives they're supposed to live (as written in the book of "Society Says..."), it doesn't get much more realistic than this. Leonardo DiCaprio gives the best performance of his steadily-solid career and Kate Winslet is expectedly good in her part. It's no surprise that the film has rubbed everyone who's seen it differently- some hate it because it's so bleak, some because they believe it's a message movie that states the obvious, but I admired it. I admired it for it's performances and the way Mendes tore down the numerous facades (most of which are beautifully deceptive and rendered here) masquerading about this world as truths. It's funny how the truth is a three-dimensional being, but how only one of those dimensions matters- the front- the side everyone can see. What's behind it, to the side of it, doesn't matter when the perception of those things is the only thing that does. "Revolutionary Road" may not be a great time at the movies, but it is a thoughtful one. [b]Grade: B[/b]

Tropic Thunder
Overrated- and as overrated as Robert Downey Jr's performance is in this film- it's underrated. He's hugely entertaining and without him, Ben Stiller's Hollywood spoof would have been a laugh-an-hour affair. The movie is barelly two. [b]Grade: B-

Rogue
[/b]They don't make monster movies like this anymore. Solid acting, suspenceful pacing, great special effects, and a different atmosphere help the story bipass its formulaic elements and reach a satisfying conclusion. Grade: B

Rogue
Rogue (2008)
7 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[b]Revolutionary Road[/b]
If you are stuck in a rut, trying to figure out a way to break up with your boyfriend/girlfriend this Valentines Day, take them on a movie date to watch "Revolutionary Road." You're guaranteed to walk into the theater as a couple and leave single. In James Cameron's "Titanic," we find out that Sam Mendes' "Revolutionary Road" is the reason why Rose (Kate Winslet) let go of Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and allowed him to drown into the mouths of hungry sharks. This is a penetrating, devastating film that's in no way entertaining to watch. In fact, it accomplishes the same type of cringe one gets from watching the "Saw" films, only through a verbal medium, rather than a rib-cage-exploding medium. As the story of a much-too-young, disillusioned couple who find themselves trapped in lives they're supposed to live (as written in the book of "Society Says..."), it doesn't get much more realistic than this. Leonardo DiCaprio gives the best performance of his steadily-solid career and Kate Winslet is expectedly good in her part. It's no surprise that the film has rubbed everyone who's seen it differently- some hate it because it's so bleak, some because they believe it's a message movie that states the obvious, but I admired it. I admired it for it's performances and the way Mendes tore down the numerous facades (most of which are beautifully deceptive and rendered here) masquerading about this world as truths. It's funny how the truth is a three-dimensional being, but how only one of those dimensions matters- the front- the side everyone can see. What's behind it, to the side of it, doesn't matter when the perception of those things is the only thing that does. "Revolutionary Road" may not be a great time at the movies, but it is a thoughtful one. [b]Grade: B[/b]

Tropic Thunder
Overrated- and as overrated as Robert Downey Jr's performance is in this film- it's underrated. He's hugely entertaining and without him, Ben Stiller's Hollywood spoof would have been a laugh-an-hour affair. The movie is barelly two. [b]Grade: B-

Rogue
[/b]They don't make monster movies like this anymore. Solid acting, suspenceful pacing, great special effects, and a different atmosphere help the story bipass its formulaic elements and reach a satisfying conclusion. Grade: B

Tropic Thunder
7 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Revolutionary Road[/b]
If you are stuck in a rut, trying to figure out a way to break up with your boyfriend/girlfriend this Valentines Day, take them on a movie date to watch "Revolutionary Road." You're guaranteed to walk into the theater as a couple and leave single. In James Cameron's "Titanic," we find out that Sam Mendes' "Revolutionary Road" is the reason why Rose (Kate Winslet) let go of Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and allowed him to drown into the mouths of hungry sharks. This is a penetrating, devastating film that's in no way entertaining to watch. In fact, it accomplishes the same type of cringe one gets from watching the "Saw" films, only through a verbal medium, rather than a rib-cage-exploding medium. As the story of a much-too-young, disillusioned couple who find themselves trapped in lives they're supposed to live (as written in the book of "Society Says..."), it doesn't get much more realistic than this. Leonardo DiCaprio gives the best performance of his steadily-solid career and Kate Winslet is expectedly good in her part. It's no surprise that the film has rubbed everyone who's seen it differently- some hate it because it's so bleak, some because they believe it's a message movie that states the obvious, but I admired it. I admired it for it's performances and the way Mendes tore down the numerous facades (most of which are beautifully deceptive and rendered here) masquerading about this world as truths. It's funny how the truth is a three-dimensional being, but how only one of those dimensions matters- the front- the side everyone can see. What's behind it, to the side of it, doesn't matter when the perception of those things is the only thing that does. "Revolutionary Road" may not be a great time at the movies, but it is a thoughtful one. [b]Grade: B[/b]

Tropic Thunder
Overrated- and as overrated as Robert Downey Jr's performance is in this film- it's underrated. He's hugely entertaining and without him, Ben Stiller's Hollywood spoof would have been a laugh-an-hour affair. The movie is barelly two. [b]Grade: B-

Rogue
[/b]They don't make monster movies like this anymore. Solid acting, suspenceful pacing, great special effects, and a different atmosphere help the story bipass its formulaic elements and reach a satisfying conclusion. Grade: B