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Rating History

Strike (Stachka)
6 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

The Soviet montage sounds better than it really ought to. The abstract collision of images by Eisenstein is as breathless as it is maddening, and the linkage of shots by Pudovkin are simply toned down collisions. Kuleshov's film was the worst of the five films, and my preference was "Mother." It was the only film that provided an emotional intensity through character and not artsy fartsy grotesque and eccentric "things" to fit in with the situation.

Do you concur? Have you seen any of these flicks?

Put it this way, "The Battleship Potempkin" is only 75 minutes long, but it is so alive and urgent that my head still hurts from the disorientation. Plus, the Odessa steps sequence is open to much interpretation, so if that tickles your fancy... or you'll see it as the emperor having no clothes.

October (Ten Days that Shook the World)
6 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

"The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty" is newsreel footage masquerading as a film...avoid this crap like the plague. And the score will drive you crazy.

Eisenstein redeems himself with "October: Ten Days That Shook the World" - this movie was insightful and entertaining, and the brisk pace makes this one of my favourite silent flicks.

Marie Antoinette
10 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]MARIE ANTOINETTE [/b][url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][b][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star7.gif[/img][/b][/url][font=Times New Roman][size=3] [/size][/font][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/marie.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Kirsten Dunst, Jason Schwartzman, Judy Davis, Rip Torn, Asia Argento, Rose Byrne, Steve Coogan. Directed by Sofia Coppola.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Marie Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst), a 14 year-old Austrian princess, is sent to marry the future king of France, Louis XVI (Jason Schwartzman). Ascending to the throne aged 19 and under constant pressure to produce an heir, Marie tries to escape her stultifying existence.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black][color=black]Cotton candy and marzipan colours [/color]make this film look beautifully tasty, sweet and pastel and wispy. Oh what a lovely film this is; eye candy doesn't even come close. The cinematography is pure lush, and the costumes magnificently elegant. But what about the plot? Sofia Coppola's previous films (like "Lost In Translation") had a languid pace to them and it's true that the film takes its time but it does work. We really feel for Marie as this teenager who is forced into marrying King Louis and constantly avoiding demands for her to fall preganant, when all she really wants to do is have fun. The people of France grow to her hate her as she wastes their money on herself. The masterstroke to the flick is the decision to use contemporary punk music on the soundtrack, the dialogue is spoken in a modern dialect, and the vices are the same: Marie loves shoes, chocolate, and lots of cake. Shot on location at the Treaty of Versailles, "Marie Antoinette" is that rare period drama that doesnt contain a drab plot behind the sumptuous costumes.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"Marie Antoinette" is a startlingly original and beautiful pop reverie that comes very close to being transcendent.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE QUEEN [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star6.gif[/img][/url][/b][/size][/font]

[font=times new roman][img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/queen.JPG[/img][color=black]With Helen Mirren, James Cromwell, Michael Sheen, Alex Jennings, Helen McCrory, Sylvia Syms. Directed by Stephen Frears.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]September, 1997. In the wake of the death of the Princess Of Wales in a Paris car crash, public opinion turns against the royal family. New Prime Minister Tony Blair (Sheen) lobbies the Queen (Mirren) to leave her Balmoral estate and return to Buckingham Palace.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen" is a pleasingly lean, focused film which effortlessly keeps to the point and refrains from digging into topical issues (for example, should the Royal family be abolished?). It is a film with a quiet confidence; never edge-of-your seat compelling, but never once deadly dull and that's what a lot of people will be turned-off by. "The Queen" falls into the category of a film I admired, but is it one I would willingly watch again? The fact that I've sealed it with three stars suggests that I probably would. And if not for the beautifully pitched sombre atmosphere, then some of the Oscar-worthy performances - Mirren and Sheen the key ones. Some may argue that they don't really look all that like who they are portraying. Doesn't matter. I knew instantly from their mannerisms and dialects who's who, and if mirroring your subject physically is a requirement, nobody told Philip Seymour Hoffman that when he played Truman Capote. I found the interaction between the Queen and Blair very interesting, not least how Blair, in the present, has suffered a reversal of fortune. History will repeat itself it seems. [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen", with a nicely trimmed running time, is a fine flick showing how even the most stiff-lipped persons have a heart.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE FOUNTAIN[/b] [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star5.gif[/img][/url][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/fountain.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Hugh Jackman, Rachel Weisz, Ellen Burstyn, Mark Magolis, Cliff Curtis, Sean Patrick Thomas. Directed by Darren Aronofsky.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Tommy Creo (Jackman) is a present-day medical researcher working on a cure for the cancer that is killing his wife, Izzi (Weisz). Meanwhile, 15th century conquistador Tomas (Jackman) searches out the Tree Of Life for Queen Isabel (Weisz). Finally, in 2500, Tom (Jackman) tries to regenerate the Tree in the heart of a star.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" represents Darren Aronofsky's first failure as a director following the idiosyncratic "Pi" and bewildering brilliant "Requiem For a Dream". The problem for "The Fountain" is twofold: it's frivolous; and it's impenetrable. A movie with such an ambitious scope as this should give me more to take away once the lights go up and I return to the real world but I pretty much understand everything that was going on here. The characters are one-dimensional, mostly preferring to just stare/glow at the camera. For all the shifting between time-zones, there's nothing going on anywhere. When I tell you that Hugh Jackman is a bald, old man in the future caressing a tree that is, presumably, his wife, I appreciate that this sounds kinda cool, but it's actually very painful to watch. I didn't exactly hate "The Fountain", but my rating for this is higher than I intended to give it. The reason being is that this is a film that Stanley Kubrick could have made. And you know what? It took me a few viewings to appreciate "2001". Perhaps I will one day grow to love the "The Fountain". [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" is a film about metaphysics, Biblical symbolism and universal love but its presentation of these themes is somewhat lame.[/color][/font]

The Fountain
The Fountain (2006)
10 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]MARIE ANTOINETTE [/b][url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][b][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star7.gif[/img][/b][/url][font=Times New Roman][size=3] [/size][/font][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/marie.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Kirsten Dunst, Jason Schwartzman, Judy Davis, Rip Torn, Asia Argento, Rose Byrne, Steve Coogan. Directed by Sofia Coppola.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Marie Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst), a 14 year-old Austrian princess, is sent to marry the future king of France, Louis XVI (Jason Schwartzman). Ascending to the throne aged 19 and under constant pressure to produce an heir, Marie tries to escape her stultifying existence.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black][color=black]Cotton candy and marzipan colours [/color]make this film look beautifully tasty, sweet and pastel and wispy. Oh what a lovely film this is; eye candy doesn't even come close. The cinematography is pure lush, and the costumes magnificently elegant. But what about the plot? Sofia Coppola's previous films (like "Lost In Translation") had a languid pace to them and it's true that the film takes its time but it does work. We really feel for Marie as this teenager who is forced into marrying King Louis and constantly avoiding demands for her to fall preganant, when all she really wants to do is have fun. The people of France grow to her hate her as she wastes their money on herself. The masterstroke to the flick is the decision to use contemporary punk music on the soundtrack, the dialogue is spoken in a modern dialect, and the vices are the same: Marie loves shoes, chocolate, and lots of cake. Shot on location at the Treaty of Versailles, "Marie Antoinette" is that rare period drama that doesnt contain a drab plot behind the sumptuous costumes.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"Marie Antoinette" is a startlingly original and beautiful pop reverie that comes very close to being transcendent.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE QUEEN [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star6.gif[/img][/url][/b][/size][/font]

[font=times new roman][img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/queen.JPG[/img][color=black]With Helen Mirren, James Cromwell, Michael Sheen, Alex Jennings, Helen McCrory, Sylvia Syms. Directed by Stephen Frears.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]September, 1997. In the wake of the death of the Princess Of Wales in a Paris car crash, public opinion turns against the royal family. New Prime Minister Tony Blair (Sheen) lobbies the Queen (Mirren) to leave her Balmoral estate and return to Buckingham Palace.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen" is a pleasingly lean, focused film which effortlessly keeps to the point and refrains from digging into topical issues (for example, should the Royal family be abolished?). It is a film with a quiet confidence; never edge-of-your seat compelling, but never once deadly dull and that's what a lot of people will be turned-off by. "The Queen" falls into the category of a film I admired, but is it one I would willingly watch again? The fact that I've sealed it with three stars suggests that I probably would. And if not for the beautifully pitched sombre atmosphere, then some of the Oscar-worthy performances - Mirren and Sheen the key ones. Some may argue that they don't really look all that like who they are portraying. Doesn't matter. I knew instantly from their mannerisms and dialects who's who, and if mirroring your subject physically is a requirement, nobody told Philip Seymour Hoffman that when he played Truman Capote. I found the interaction between the Queen and Blair very interesting, not least how Blair, in the present, has suffered a reversal of fortune. History will repeat itself it seems. [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen", with a nicely trimmed running time, is a fine flick showing how even the most stiff-lipped persons have a heart.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE FOUNTAIN[/b] [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star5.gif[/img][/url][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/fountain.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Hugh Jackman, Rachel Weisz, Ellen Burstyn, Mark Magolis, Cliff Curtis, Sean Patrick Thomas. Directed by Darren Aronofsky.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Tommy Creo (Jackman) is a present-day medical researcher working on a cure for the cancer that is killing his wife, Izzi (Weisz). Meanwhile, 15th century conquistador Tomas (Jackman) searches out the Tree Of Life for Queen Isabel (Weisz). Finally, in 2500, Tom (Jackman) tries to regenerate the Tree in the heart of a star.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" represents Darren Aronofsky's first failure as a director following the idiosyncratic "Pi" and bewildering brilliant "Requiem For a Dream". The problem for "The Fountain" is twofold: it's frivolous; and it's impenetrable. A movie with such an ambitious scope as this should give me more to take away once the lights go up and I return to the real world but I pretty much understand everything that was going on here. The characters are one-dimensional, mostly preferring to just stare/glow at the camera. For all the shifting between time-zones, there's nothing going on anywhere. When I tell you that Hugh Jackman is a bald, old man in the future caressing a tree that is, presumably, his wife, I appreciate that this sounds kinda cool, but it's actually very painful to watch. I didn't exactly hate "The Fountain", but my rating for this is higher than I intended to give it. The reason being is that this is a film that Stanley Kubrick could have made. And you know what? It took me a few viewings to appreciate "2001". Perhaps I will one day grow to love the "The Fountain". [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" is a film about metaphysics, Biblical symbolism and universal love but its presentation of these themes is somewhat lame.[/color][/font]

The Queen
The Queen (2006)
10 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]MARIE ANTOINETTE [/b][url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][b][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star7.gif[/img][/b][/url][font=Times New Roman][size=3] [/size][/font][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/marie.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Kirsten Dunst, Jason Schwartzman, Judy Davis, Rip Torn, Asia Argento, Rose Byrne, Steve Coogan. Directed by Sofia Coppola.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Marie Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst), a 14 year-old Austrian princess, is sent to marry the future king of France, Louis XVI (Jason Schwartzman). Ascending to the throne aged 19 and under constant pressure to produce an heir, Marie tries to escape her stultifying existence.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black][color=black]Cotton candy and marzipan colours [/color]make this film look beautifully tasty, sweet and pastel and wispy. Oh what a lovely film this is; eye candy doesn't even come close. The cinematography is pure lush, and the costumes magnificently elegant. But what about the plot? Sofia Coppola's previous films (like "Lost In Translation") had a languid pace to them and it's true that the film takes its time but it does work. We really feel for Marie as this teenager who is forced into marrying King Louis and constantly avoiding demands for her to fall preganant, when all she really wants to do is have fun. The people of France grow to her hate her as she wastes their money on herself. The masterstroke to the flick is the decision to use contemporary punk music on the soundtrack, the dialogue is spoken in a modern dialect, and the vices are the same: Marie loves shoes, chocolate, and lots of cake. Shot on location at the Treaty of Versailles, "Marie Antoinette" is that rare period drama that doesnt contain a drab plot behind the sumptuous costumes.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"Marie Antoinette" is a startlingly original and beautiful pop reverie that comes very close to being transcendent.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE QUEEN [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star6.gif[/img][/url][/b][/size][/font]

[font=times new roman][img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/queen.JPG[/img][color=black]With Helen Mirren, James Cromwell, Michael Sheen, Alex Jennings, Helen McCrory, Sylvia Syms. Directed by Stephen Frears.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]September, 1997. In the wake of the death of the Princess Of Wales in a Paris car crash, public opinion turns against the royal family. New Prime Minister Tony Blair (Sheen) lobbies the Queen (Mirren) to leave her Balmoral estate and return to Buckingham Palace.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen" is a pleasingly lean, focused film which effortlessly keeps to the point and refrains from digging into topical issues (for example, should the Royal family be abolished?). It is a film with a quiet confidence; never edge-of-your seat compelling, but never once deadly dull and that's what a lot of people will be turned-off by. "The Queen" falls into the category of a film I admired, but is it one I would willingly watch again? The fact that I've sealed it with three stars suggests that I probably would. And if not for the beautifully pitched sombre atmosphere, then some of the Oscar-worthy performances - Mirren and Sheen the key ones. Some may argue that they don't really look all that like who they are portraying. Doesn't matter. I knew instantly from their mannerisms and dialects who's who, and if mirroring your subject physically is a requirement, nobody told Philip Seymour Hoffman that when he played Truman Capote. I found the interaction between the Queen and Blair very interesting, not least how Blair, in the present, has suffered a reversal of fortune. History will repeat itself it seems. [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Queen", with a nicely trimmed running time, is a fine flick showing how even the most stiff-lipped persons have a heart.[/color][/font]

[font=Tahoma][size=5][b]THE FOUNTAIN[/b] [url="http://java_script_:Pop('images/FFT_starsrating_gray.jpg','popup','width=428,height=591,scrollbars=yes')"][img]http://filmthreat.com/images/Star5.gif[/img][/url][/size][/font]

[img]http://www.reelviews.net/2005images/fountain.JPG[/img][font=times new roman][color=black]With Hugh Jackman, Rachel Weisz, Ellen Burstyn, Mark Magolis, Cliff Curtis, Sean Patrick Thomas. Directed by Darren Aronofsky.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]Tommy Creo (Jackman) is a present-day medical researcher working on a cure for the cancer that is killing his wife, Izzi (Weisz). Meanwhile, 15th century conquistador Tomas (Jackman) searches out the Tree Of Life for Queen Isabel (Weisz). Finally, in 2500, Tom (Jackman) tries to regenerate the Tree in the heart of a star.[/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" represents Darren Aronofsky's first failure as a director following the idiosyncratic "Pi" and bewildering brilliant "Requiem For a Dream". The problem for "The Fountain" is twofold: it's frivolous; and it's impenetrable. A movie with such an ambitious scope as this should give me more to take away once the lights go up and I return to the real world but I pretty much understand everything that was going on here. The characters are one-dimensional, mostly preferring to just stare/glow at the camera. For all the shifting between time-zones, there's nothing going on anywhere. When I tell you that Hugh Jackman is a bald, old man in the future caressing a tree that is, presumably, his wife, I appreciate that this sounds kinda cool, but it's actually very painful to watch. I didn't exactly hate "The Fountain", but my rating for this is higher than I intended to give it. The reason being is that this is a film that Stanley Kubrick could have made. And you know what? It took me a few viewings to appreciate "2001". Perhaps I will one day grow to love the "The Fountain". [/color][/font]

[font=times new roman][color=black]"The Fountain" is a film about metaphysics, Biblical symbolism and universal love but its presentation of these themes is somewhat lame.[/color][/font]