Steven Wright's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

Want-to-See Movies

Want-to-See TV

Rating History

Birdman
Birdman (2014)
2 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Inarritu's enormous bag of tricks delights and astounds in equal measure during its runtime; however, when it lies deflated at your feet at the end, it's difficult not to feel a bit underwhelmed - Keaton's heavyweight performance is often the only thing keeping the overwhelming, unearned pretension of the script from contaminating the whole of New York City, especially near the end - still, its appeal is as broad as the movies it satirizes, so it is definitely worth a watch for almost any moviegoer

Batman Returns
2 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

though Michael Keaton's Wayne never quite finds his wings, Burton manages to strike the sweet spot between cartoonish effrontery and the seething torment underlying it - special shout-out to DeVito, Pfeiffer, and Walken, who bring ardor to roles that could have been easily phoned in

Selma
Selma (2015)
2 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Okay, this one's worthy of a few more sentences than normal. Yes, Oyelowo's performance as King shines through, even if it occasionally descends into the realm of caricature, but the screenplay undoes him at every term, unable to decide whether or not to focus on King the man or the events at Selma proper. It settles instead for a bizarre mixture of overwrought family drama, gratuitous violence, and ham-fisted political commentary, and none of it works at all. Though it has a handful of profoundly affecting moments, the vast majority of the film feels like it was written with a pen that somebody accidentally dropped into a sugar bowl. Characters constantly pander to the audience, speaking as if they know the future and generally behaving like the pawns of a writer more interested in scoring political points than writing believable dialogue. All-in-all, the film is the very definition of Oscar-bait: a safe, broadly-drawn drama that reveals exactly as much as a reading of the SCLC's Wikipedia page would, provided it was set to a stirring score.