Victor Teran's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

My Neighbor Totoro
29 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Despite the fact I used to watch anime in my youth, I have never seen a Studio Ghibli film (I tried watching "Spirited Away" back when it came out in theatres but its grotesque visuals scared the shit out of my 4 year old self). But due to their popularity I finally decided to catch up and I have to say, what a solid and memorable beginning for a studio. "My Neighbor Totoro" tells a simple but effective story filled with imagination, the animation is top notch, the creature design is simple but memorable, the setting is quite beautiful, and overall it is quite charming and entertaining.

Day of the Dead
29 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

July 16 2017 the man that revolutionized the horror genre and created the latest addition in the pantheon of iconic universal monsters, the zombie, passed away: George A. Romero. To honor this man I decided to revisit a trilogy I haven´t seen in years: Romero´s Living Dead Trilogy. For the record I´m aware there are three more movies ("Land", "Diary" and "Survival") but I want to honor Romero by reviewing some of his best work.

Almost 10 years after the release of "Dawn of the Dead", George A. Romero decided to return to his zombie world with the awfully titled "Day of the Dead", the polarizing installment of the Living Dead Trilogy. Is this a worthy finally for the trilogy?

After the events of "Dawn of the Dead", zombie have overrun the world. With few humans left, we follow a group of scientists who try to find a solution to the zombie pandemic, however they biggest treat may not be the flesh eating ghouls but the soldiers they share room with.

From an isolated farmhouse to an overrun mall, Romero now take us to a bunker and while the social commentary tried to be more ambitious, it ended up falling apart completely. While "Night" and "Dawn" had its handful of problems they also had Romero´s creativity to compensate, but it seems that Romero ran out of ideas zombie ideas by 1985. "Day of the Dead" has the worst acting of the trilogy as it is so hammy it is quite hilarious, a story that starts with premise but soon falls apart, social commentary that seems aimless, unlikeable characters, a hilarious villain that tries to be menacing and utterly failing, a laughable script, by the numbers storytelling, and major pacing issues. However let's give credit where credit´s due: The makeup effects are fantastic, they are some of the best work Tom Savini has ever done.

"Day of the Dead" is a disappointing conclusion as it suffers from God awful acting, a weak script, uninteresting characters and humongous pacing issues. It is by no means a bad movie but considering its predecessors it is quite a downfall.

Dawn of the Dead
29 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

July 16 2017 the man that revolutionized the horror genre and created the latest addition in the pantheon of iconic universal monsters, the zombie, passed away: George A. Romero. To honor this man I decided to revisit a trilogy I haven´t seen in years: Romero´s Living Dead Trilogy. For the record I´m aware there are three more movies ("Land", "Diary" and "Survival") but I want to honor Romero by reviewing some of his best work.

Ten years after the release of his greatest contribution to cinema, George A. Romero return to his zombie roots and gave us one of the greatest sequels in the horror history: The endlessly imitated but never duplicated "Dawn of the Dead".

After the zombie outbreak, we follow a group of survivors that find shelter in a mall.

Back when I first watched Romero´s Living Dead Trilogy I was surprised that 'the old boring one' (to quote my younger self) was the one considered a classic when the second installment is 'so much better and fun', and I have to say while I disagree with my younger self (as you can read in my "Night of the Living Dead" review) I still believe this is the most rewatchable and fun of the trilogy. While "Dawn of the Dead" suffers from mediocre acting (to be fair, these are the greatest performances in the whole trilogy, but stil...), forgettable characters and dated special effects/make up. However Romero again redeems the film with his brilliant and fun ideas that go from using a mall as the setting to something as unique and fun as throwing pies at zombies. But creativity isn't the only thing Romero brings to the table but also his storytelling. Every zombie movie is focused on a handful of survivors fighting to stay alive but in the end they succumb to the chaos, however "Dawn of the Dead" is focused on a location and social commentary. Few movies in horror cinema have focused so much on the location that it becomes a character ("The Shining", "Crimson Peak", "Rosemary´s Baby", etc.) and "Dawn" succeeds at this. Finally, the social commentary is again quite freaking obvious/unsubtle but still effective.
On a side note, despite this being Romero´s baby, you can see the fingerprints of Dario Argento at his prime, making this a giallo zombie movie. Plus you have the awesome Goblin doing the soundtrack.

"Dawn of the Dead" is quite possibly the greatest horror sequel to date (only challenged by the "Evil Dead" sequels and "Dream Warriros") as it doesn´t try to duplicate "Night of the Living Dead" but it builds up upon it. It is fun, clever, extremely entertaining, and iconic.

Night of the Living Dead
29 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

July 16 2017 the man that revolutionized the horror genre and created the latest addition in the pantheon of iconic universal monsters, the zombie, passed away: George A. Romero. To honor this man I decided to revisit a trilogy I haven´t seen in years: Romero´s Living Dead Trilogy. For the record I´m aware there are three more movies ("Land", "Diary" and "Survival") but I want to honor Romero by reviewing some of his best work.

Since Enkidu returned from the dead, the concept of zombies (a reanimated body) has existed. However nowadays the word zombie means undead cannibals that spread throughout bites and scratches inflicted upon living humans, a concept that was introduced in the B movie that turn into an absolute classic: George A. Romero´s directorial debut "Night of the Living Dead".

It goes without saying that Romero´s debut is one of the most influential films in the horror genre, and despite being almost half a century old, it has undeniably hold up. "Night of the Living Dead" is quite a simple and straightforward film that shows that less is more. While the acting is quite bad, what makes this film great is the fabulous, yet old fashioned, score and Romero himself. While I never considered Romero an auteur -I have always said Romero was a blue collar director - he was a man with fantastic ideas: The lighting is perfect as there are many times zombies (or ghouls) pop out of nowhere, the idea of the being surrounded by countless mindless creatures is quite simple but crushingly effective (who hasn´t have the nightmare where the whole world is against you) to the point that it doesn't matter how simplistic the zombies themselves look, the gore is quite striking regardless of the film´s age, and finally the trademark Romero social commentary that is quite freaking obvious but it doesn't distract from the experience overall.

"Night of the Living Dead" is a groundbreaking horror film that has stand the test of time. It is a thrilling directorial debut that is as powerful as it was 49 years ago.

Enter the Dragon
29 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

When it comes to martial arts no one has achieved as much popularity as pop culture legend Bruce Lee, even if only appeared in five feature films with only one being an American production: The influential "Enter the Dragon". Considering its impact in pop culture, is this the classic many people claim it is?

Lee is a highly skilled martial artist that is tasked by the British intelligence to investigate a crime lord called Han, by attending martial arts tournament.

When you watch any genre movie you have different expectations: With horror we expect good scares, comedy with good jokes, spy movies with cool/memorable gadgets and tremendous action sequences, etc. So when it comes to martial arts movies we expect some well-choreographed action sequences and to be highly entertaining and "Enter the Dragon" succeeds at this. Being a B movie, this Bruce Lee film has a cheesy plot, wooden acting, hilariously dated special effects, forgettable characters and eye roll inducing dialog. However despite its numerous flaws this film stands out and deserves its reputation. "Enter the Dragon" has outstanding fighting scenes (which is not surprising considering that most people in here are martial artists but still, the results are tremendous), spectacular stunts, the score is fantastic, the pacing is spot on, and overall it is quite entertaining. However the greatest thing about this film isn't the martial arts themselves but the incredible production design as it is quite simple but surprisingly effective and unforgettable. From the simple tournament setting to the villain´s iconic lair, this production design has been imitated to death ("Man with the Golden Gun" and "Mortal Kombat" being the first ones that come to mind) but never duplicated.

"Enter the Dragon" is a well-made film that not only fulfills its duty of giving the audience fantastic action sequences but it also shines due to its production design. A highly entertaining film worth seeing.