David Arias's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

Apocalypse Now
42 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Masterfully shot and directed... Francis ford coppola's "apocalypse now" is a haunting, cinematic masterpiece that takes us into the madness of war. The use of color and lighting is so unique and visually stunning that you can't keep your eyes away from the screen. A film that should be celebrated for inventing new ways on how to shoot a scene.

Capote
Capote (2005)
42 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Phillip Seymour Hoffman's greatest performance; "capote" is an extraordinary biopic with great storytelling and great direction.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
42 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

"three billboards outside of ebbing, Missouri" might not be for everyone due to its slow-burning storyline, but for those who are into filmmaking, you should admire the actors' performances and the dark humor it represents.

Thor: Ragnarok
42 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Definitely the best of the three thor movies. "Thor: Ragnarok" is funny and visually unique. however, the film does has its own faults. For instance, several of its green screen effects can be noticeable and uninspiring. It's almost as if the filmmakers were too lazy to reshoot certain scenes and decided to say, "fuck it let's use green screen to make it easier on us". Also, the movie sometimes doesn't take itself too seriously. Yes, it good to have some laughs here and there, but when it comes to the destruction of asgard, you should keep it as serious possible, not make everything a joke. i guess this is the best we can get when it comes to producing a thor movie.

La La Land
La La Land (2016)
42 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

A nice homage to the classic Hollywood movies back in the golden age of cinema. "La La Land" is catchy, fun, and masterfully shot. The script might not be as strong as some other musicals, but at least it doesn't lose itself when it comes to the characters' motives.