David Arias's Profile - Rotten Tomatoes

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Rating History

Gangs of New York
7 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Another one of Martin Scorsese's weakest efforts. Maybe he did tried and it's just the script that pulled him down. "Gangs of New York" suffers from a cliché, formulaic plot that we have seen many times before. A boy sees the death of his father and now he seeks revenge on the man who killed him. It's a revenge story that doesn't offer anything new to the table. It's Shakespearean for sure, but it's miles away from being memorable. Also, too many themes jammed into one. The film can't make up its mind on what it's trying to be. Is it a film on how New York was made? Is it about the rise and fall of a gangster? Were the Irish really that cartoony back in the day? Did we really had to have that subplot about people being angry about the army lottery? Daniel Day Lewis shines as the frightening, Bill the Butcher and reminds us why he's one of the best actors of all time. Leo and Cameron are nothing more but canon fodder to him. Any scene that Daniel is in he always stole the show. A 3 hour movie that should have been shorter. Still, at least it was mildly entertaining, for those who enjoy gangster movies.

Dunkirk
Dunkirk (2017)
7 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

"Dunkirk" may be epic and nicely filmed, but when it comes to its story, it lacks the depth and feeling that several other war films has brought to the table. Almost none of its characters have any sense of development. They feel and look lifeless as the dead bodies floating on the shore. I care for none of them. If the film had more dialogue and emotion coming out from these characters, then I would have been more thrilled and fearful as they try to escape the beaches of Dunkirk. However, I did enjoyed the script's non-linear approach when it comes to telling its story. At first, it became confusing, but once all three plots collide, they create a satisfying conclusion.

Porco Rosso (Kurenai no buta)
8 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes

A huge improvement from Hayao Miyazai's previous work, "Porco Rosso" is an exciting, twisted tale about a pig who can fly a plane, and he's good at it too! With fun characters popping out left and right, you can't help but smile and laugh as the story flies along. The story is imaginative, the animation is crisp, and the voice performance from the main cast makes up for the film's third disappointing act. What I mean by that is that when the story finishes, it feels incomplete and unsatisfying. You were hoping for some serious, intense dogfight between the protagonist and antagonist, but instead it falls under the Looney Tunes action sequence were nothing feels serious or rewarding. Nevertheless, there's more positives than negatives, so that's a win in my books.

Kiki's Delivery Service
8 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Definitely not one of my favorites coming from director Hayao Miyazaki; "Kiki's Delivery Service" might be heartwarming and has a nice coming of age story for young children, but fails to raise up the bar set by Hayao Miyazaki's previous works (Castle in the Sky, Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, etc.). There are too many subplots for the story to handle. It's, as if, the filmmakers were running out of things for Kiki to do, so they decided to add random plot points that doesn't help Kiki evolve as a character. The only subplot in the story that was interesting was the one where she loses her power. That moment should have been in the climax, not in the last act. Again, pacing is another issue that Miyazaki can't seem to grasp it. Still, it's good to have this story in your collection to remind you that Studio Ghibli is still one of the greatest anime creators of all time.

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
30 days ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Funny, heartwarming, and relatable to those who faced this kind of situation, "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" not only remind us that love can come from anywhere, but also not to judge someone for their race, color, and profession. Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier, and Katherine Hepburn are wonderfully played and casted thanks to the direction of Stanley Kramer, who keeps striking us with well-placed humor. Another film that stood test of time because it tackles the same problems we face today. When are we going to subdue racism and stop judging people, we will never know. One thing for sure, we are in a better position than we were 50 and so years ago.