The Graduate (1967)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: The music, the performances, the precision in capturing the post-college malaise -- The Graduate's coming-of-age story is indeed one for the ages.


Movie Info

"One word: plastics." "Are you here for an affair?" These lines and others became cultural touchstones, as 1960s youth rebellion seeped into the California upper middle-class in Mike Nichols' landmark hit. Mentally adrift the summer after graduating from college, suburbanite Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) would rather float in his parents' pool than follow adult advice about his future. But the exhortation of family friend Mr. Robinson (Murray Hamilton) to seize every possible opportunity … More

Rating: PG (N/A)
Genre: Drama, Romance, Classics, Comedy
Directed By: , , , , , , , , ,
Written By: Calder Willingham, Buck Henry
In Theaters:
On DVD: Jun 19, 2001
Runtime:
Embassy Pictures/Rialto Pictures - Official Site

Cast


as Benjamin Braddock

as Mrs. Robinson

as Elaine Robinson

as Mr. Braddock

as Mr. Robinson

as Mrs. Braddock

as McCleery

as Room Clerk

as Mr. Maguire

as Mrs. Singleman

as Miss DeWitt

as Nightclub Stripper

as Woman on Bus

as Berkeley Student

as Mr. DeWitt
Show More Cast

Related News & Features

Elizabeth Wilson: 1921-2015
– New York Times
Mike Nichols: 1931-2014
– Rotten Tomatoes

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Critic Reviews for The Graduate

All Critics (62) | Top Critics (14)

As it stands, the vacuum of that warped, moneyed Los Angeles society is too exaggerated, too incredible. But one can't help but believe in Hoffman if not in the disjointed character he portrays.

Full Review… | March 10, 2015
New York Daily News
Top Critic

Be agog at Anne Bancroft's Mrs. Robinson in some of the most hilariously icky seduction scenes ever filmed. See Mike Nichols (with help from Simon & Garfunkel) take control of the Zeitgeist. See the mood go dark -- darker than you remember.

Full Review… | March 10, 2015
New York Magazine/Vulture
Top Critic

The Graduate gives some substance to the contention that American films are coming of age -- of our age.

Full Review… | November 24, 2014
The New Republic
Top Critic

The remarkably true ring of Webb's dialogue is preserved and augmented, the visual potential lifted to next power in absurdity.

Full Review… | November 20, 2014
Hollywood Reporter
Top Critic

The emotional elevation of the film is due in no small measure to the extraordinarily engaging performances of Anne Bancroft as the wife-mother-mistress, Dustin Hoffman as the lumbering Lancelot, and Katherine Ross as his fair Elaine.

Full Review… | January 14, 2013
Village Voice
Top Critic

It's consistently fleet and funny, even as it probes the heady abandon and looming hangover that typified the decade of discontent.

Full Review… | April 10, 2012
Time Out
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Graduate

Dustin Hoffman's charming performance propels this film into one of the best coming-of-age films of all time. The Graduate is highlighted with an artful direction, innocent humor, spellbinding music (soundtrack by Simon & Garfunkel) and an accurate strike on reality. 4/5

Eugene Bernabe
Eugene Bernabe

Super Reviewer

You can't get more iconic than this. The Graduate is flawlessly written, deftly acted, and superbly touches us with its unconventionality and ultimate power. It captures the era of the 60s, yet is also profoundly timely. Hoffman's angst is relatable for every young adult watching the film, and the nostalgia and shallowness of American suburbia is also quite relatable to anyone who has spent at least a year living in the suburbs. Anne Bancroft is exceptional and ruthless as Mrs. Robinson, making for an unforgettable performance. The film's aura--the iconic soundtrack and iconic cinematographic choices--is captivating. Ultimately The Graduate is more than a funny, nostalgic movie: it is triumphant. It is a triumph of the human mind and the human spirit.

Matthew Samuel Mirliani
Matthew Samuel Mirliani

Super Reviewer

Could "The Graduate" be the first art-house movie of all time? Ehh, I don't think so, but it's definitely a game-changer. At its time, Hollywood dished out grand epics after grand epics with "perfect" and steady camerawork, larger than life characters, and narratives that stretch at an epic scale. But "The Graduate" does a U-turn on the traditional ways of filmmaking. Unconventional mechanics like quick zooms, strangely edited shots, and lingering close-ups are riddled about in "The Graduate". It does enough difference for it to stand out among other films alike it. But to say that the narrative is different from the rest is an understatement -- its daring, bold, and darkly challenging. Especially after the time the Production Code came to a close, "The Graduate" dives head-first into dark waters. This is a psychologically driven character-study of a young innocent boy finding his place in the world to be a "different" man.

"The Graduate" is absolutely effective in what it intends to do. Everything is cohesively crafted: strong thematic foundation, solid character development, sharp writing, and thought-provoking symbolism. Entertaining, provocative, and strangely disturbing, "The Graduate" immerses audiences into a young boy's world that's trying to make the best out of his life.

Albert Kim
Albert Kim

Super Reviewer

The Graduate Quotes

– Submitted by Paul B (13 months ago)
– Submitted by Kia M (16 months ago)
– Submitted by Kia M (16 months ago)
– Submitted by Kia M (16 months ago)

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