Margot at the Wedding (2007) - Rotten Tomatoes

Margot at the Wedding (2007)



Critic Consensus: Despite a great cast, the characters in Margot at the Wedding are too unlikable to enthrall viewers.

Movie Info

Margot Zeller, a savagely bright, razor-tongued short-story writer who creates chaos wherever she goes, sets off on a surprise journey to the wedding of her estranged and free-spirited, unassuming sister Pauline. Margot, with her all-too-rapidly maturing son Claude in tow, arrives with the gale force of a hurricane. From the minute she meets Pauline's fiancé--the unemployed artist Malcolm--Margot starts to plant seeds of doubt about the union. As the wedding approaches, one complication crashes into the next: vengeful neighbors, a beloved tree in the backyard and Margot's own marital turmoil. The two sisters, find themselves at the precipice of an unexpected transformation ultimately revealing that even when your family is about to implode, the one thing you can cling to for solace and comfort is your imploding family.more
Rating: R (for sexual content and language)
Genre: Drama, Art House & International, Comedy
Directed By:
Written By: Noah Baumbach
In Theaters:
On DVD: Feb 19, 2008
Box Office: $1.9M
Paramount Vantage - Official Site


Jack Black
as Malcolm
Zane Pais
as Claude
Ciarán Hinds
as Dick Koosman
Halley Feiffer
as Maisy Koosman
Show More Cast

News & Interviews for Margot at the Wedding

Critic Reviews for Margot at the Wedding

All Critics (170) | Top Critics (42)

Baumbach's interest in families - a distinct Baumbachian sort of family - is acute and his observations often painful and delivered with a dry wit.

Full Review… | February 28, 2008
Time Out
Top Critic

As in the minutely observed anatomy of a divorce in The Squid and the Whale, the pleasures and pains of Margot reside in the smallness of scope and queasy focus on delicate family matters.

Full Review… | September 30, 2014
Stop Smiling

Who the hell names their son Claude? Do they want him to get beat up every day of his life?

Full Review… | April 28, 2011
East Bay Express

The results aren't bruising, just numbing

Full Review… | August 27, 2009

Noah Baumbach’s entry into the dysfunctional-family sweepstakes is a successfully depressing affair that has some genuine laughs to maintain interest while the fake relationships that dominate every scene leave the viewer as estranged as the char

Full Review… | July 23, 2009

The raw, real centerpiece is the relationship between Kidman and Leigh, whose performances drive the film.

Full Review… | December 27, 2008

Audience Reviews for Margot at the Wedding


In its first half, it is amusing to laugh at the expense of how far these people can go in being so obnoxious, but later on it appears that what Baumbach really wants is to defy us and push us to endure a despicable gallery of characters till in the end it is nearly insufferable.

Carlos Magalhăes

Super Reviewer


I usually like Noah Baumbach's dialogue so much that I'm able to overlook his films' meandering pace and unlikeable characters. I could not forgive this one, however, both because the dialogue isn't as consistently sharp and because the overall structure is unmercifully dull. Though Jack Black's show-stealing performance reaffirms Baumbach's ability to maximize the humor he can get out of his misanthropes, the same is not true for the anti-hero played by Nicole Kidman. She plays her role efficiently, but gives absolutely no humanity to the part as Black does, and as Jeff Daniels and Ben Stiller have in the writer/director's other, better films.

Sam Barnett
Sam Barnett

Super Reviewer

This film is in my favorite genre: dark humored, pointless, character driven films. Noah Baumbach is one of my favorite writer/directors, and in this story of a strung out writer at her sister's wedding and all the family dysfunction that goes along with it, the film writes itself with its strong characters and gritty pretense. The storyline isn't all too original, but the performances from these actors are driving, unflinching, and realistic. Nicole Kidman has never been so unlikable and flighty as she is in this film. She is narrow minded of her sister, who is marrying a dilettante (Jack Black) who Margot deems unfit for her. There is also a sensitive past between the two sisters and their family, intensified by the fact that Margot's sister (Jennifer Jason Leigh) currently lives in the old family house. There is a bitter honesty between the siblings but also a kind of magic realism, as their lives are slowly unearthed to one another after all these years. Kidman especially stirs the pot between the factions of the family with her commentary on her sister's fiance, their past, and the fact that all her writing is autobiographical and has ruined her sister's first marriage, alienated her from her family, and caused a rift in her own marriage, also caused by an affair with an egotistical ass. What is really striking about these interrelationships is that of the children, especially Margot's son, who she repeatedly self-diagnoses as having Asperger's and when she wants to be nice describes him as an artistic soul. Her son seems spoiled, yet that may seem the case because he speaks of things he knows little about with his cousin and family friend, but when he speaks to his mother she either undermines what he thinks and feels as childish blather, or intellectual hierarchy supplemented by her own particular parenting style. Even though it is strangely pointless throughout, I think the ending is supposed to be uplifting, as Margot is trying to stop her reckless behavior and reconnect with her family. Still, there is nothing pseudo intellectual about this character study or bombastic from Jack Black's performance as the light comedy. It has some simple realism, but really it's about family, and the lengths we go to protect ourselves from the only people who know us best.

Spencer S.

Super Reviewer

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