Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen (2010)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.


Movie Info

Hildegard von Bingen was truly a woman ahead of her time. A visionary in every sense of the word, this famed 12th-century Benedictine nun was a Christian mystic, composer, philosopher, playwright, poet, naturalist, scientist, physician, herbalist and ecological activist. In Vision, New German Cinema auteur Margarethe von Trotta (Marianne and Juliane, Rosa Luxemburg, Rosenstrasse) reunites with recurrent star Barbara Sukowa (Zentropa, Berlin Alexanderplatz) to bring the story of this … More

Rating: Unrated
Genre: Faith & Spirituality, Sports & Fitness, Art House & International, Documentary, Drama, Special Interest
Directed By:
Written By: Margarethe von Trotta
In Theaters:
On DVD: Apr 19, 2011
Box Office: $0.4M
Runtime:
Zeitgeist Films - Official Site

Cast


as Hildegard von Bingen

as Brother Volmar

as Richardis von Stade

as Jutta

as Richardis' Mother

as Jutta von Sponheim

as Young Hildegard

as Abbess Tengwich

as Emperor Frederick Ba...
Show More Cast

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Critic Reviews for Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen

All Critics (38) | Top Critics (16)

There was obviously much to this woman, yet somehow Visions feels curiously empty feeling.

Full Review… | February 3, 2011
Detroit News
Top Critic

Vision is shot through with issues of power - personal, political, spiritual. Which makes it a terrifically resonant work.

Full Review… | December 17, 2010
Denver Post
Top Critic

Barbara Sukowa brings her veteran presence to the role, and nicely fuses its dual nature, holy instrument and holy terror, the passive vessel of a higher power and the active force of the good mother.

Full Review… | December 3, 2010
Globe and Mail
Top Critic

Although this true story offers numerous opportunities for skepticism and irony, director Margarethe von Trotta accords Hildegard the respect of a proto-feminist forebear and frames her in golden light like a Vermeer painting.

Full Review… | November 24, 2010
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Top Critic

It's hard to muster more than curious indifference to Margarethe von Trotta's "Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen."

Full Review… | November 18, 2010
Seattle Times
Top Critic

What we have here is the story of a very cool nun from a thousand years ago.

Full Review… | November 11, 2010
San Francisco Chronicle
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen

½

Biopic on the life of the fascinating 12th century Bendectine nun who saw visions of God and was also a composer, philosopher, polymath, and a strong-willed woman who often butted heads with the Church's male hierarchy. Amazing in it's ability to draw you into its now alien world and get you involved with clerical politics and the slow, quiet rhythms of cloistered life.

366weirdmovies
Greg S

Super Reviewer

½

"Vision" starts on December 31, 999 with a group of people fearing the end of the world with the Y1K virus, huddled together praying, expecting not to wake up in the morning.(I have heard of people who had hangovers so massive they almost wish they hadn't woken up but that's something else entirely.) They get a pleasant surprise when they do.

Into this world of ignorance walks Hildegard von Bingen(Barbara Sukowa) who at the age of eight is given over to the care of a cloister. 30 years later and she is about to be appointed magistra but claims ill health and anyway her fellow nuns should vote for her which they do almost unanimously. Along with her spiritual duties, she becomes interested in medicine and studies how music can also be used to heal the body. And then the visions kick in which she confesses to Brother Volmar(Heino Ferch), resulting with her being threatened with the charge of heresy.

Written and directed by Margarethe von Trotta, "Vision" is an engaging look at an amazing woman who was way ahead of her time, depicted not as a saint, but as a flawed human being. With the exception of the Arabic world, the Church had most of the accumulated learning which Hildegard used her skills to negotiate access to for her and her nuns. With this learning, she started the slow walk out of the dark ages into a new world of knowledge. And part of that comes with having respect for and knowledge of the body.(Unless you're getting off on it, I have never understood self-flagellation.)

Harlequin68
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

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