Omagh Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ January 18, 2011
With an eerily prescient line of dialogue, "Omagh" is a devastating dramatization of a terrorist bombing by the Real IRA on August 15, 1998, killing 29 and injuring countless others. The terrorists only do this to make a point in a town in Northern Ireland where everybody else has learned to live in peace. The movie starts on the morning with unbearable suspense, as the terrorists move into position to the town which is frequented by townspeople going about their business unaware. There is a warning but miscommunication leads to the people being evacuated in the wrong direction. And a lot of the film is spent exploring the authorities' mishandling of the tragedy. Remember that the government's role is to protect its citizens against threats like this.

"Omagh" uses its handheld camerawork and jump cuts to tell a powerfully personal story. Michael Gallagher(Gerald McSorley, who is superb) frantically searches for his son Aiden(Paul Kelly), who had gone into town to buy a pair of jeans, in the wake of the explosion. Later, after he buries his son, he becomes an accidental activist, using his eloquent voice to unite the victims' families, as the pain never quite goes away. However, in the search for answers, Michael is in danger of losing sight of what is truly important.
Super Reviewer
February 6, 2012
A great addition to the canon of films that deal with the Troubles. Explores the often unattainable peace that an individual needs to find in light of a life changing tragedy and the courage that can emerge.
½ August 28, 2008
Omagh highlights the permeating effect of terrorism on victims and families from a perspective most of us (thankfully) have not experienced.
A superb film that forces the viewer to embrace the myriad of emotions it characters are enduring.
½ April 6, 2009
Paul Greengrass, who previous wrote and directed Bloody Sunday, co-wrote this, and once again he shines a light on the victims of the region's seemingly endless strife.
July 20, 2013
Irish telefilm drama following the tale of a man who, after losing his 21 year old son in an IRA bombing in a small market town Omagh, becomes the spokesman for the families of such victims who are often sidelined by indifference. A film marked by the unmistakable style of Greengrass, who wrote and produced the film. The subject drags a little but the film is still impressive for its realistic approach.
May 25, 2012
Otra excelente película sobre el IRA y el conflicto de Irlanda del Norte. Trata sobre el problema del terrorismo, las víctimas y la búsqueda de justicia.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ January 18, 2011
With an eerily prescient line of dialogue, "Omagh" is a devastating dramatization of a terrorist bombing by the Real IRA on August 15, 1998, killing 29 and injuring countless others. The terrorists only do this to make a point in a town in Northern Ireland where everybody else has learned to live in peace. The movie starts on the morning with unbearable suspense, as the terrorists move into position to the town which is frequented by townspeople going about their business unaware. There is a warning but miscommunication leads to the people being evacuated in the wrong direction. And a lot of the film is spent exploring the authorities' mishandling of the tragedy. Remember that the government's role is to protect its citizens against threats like this.

"Omagh" uses its handheld camerawork and jump cuts to tell a powerfully personal story. Michael Gallagher(Gerald McSorley, who is superb) frantically searches for his son Aiden(Paul Kelly), who had gone into town to buy a pair of jeans, in the wake of the explosion. Later, after he buries his son, he becomes an accidental activist, using his eloquent voice to unite the victims' families, as the pain never quite goes away. However, in the search for answers, Michael is in danger of losing sight of what is truly important.
October 14, 2005
WHAT A POWERFUL FILM, INCREDIBLY WELL DONE. VERY MOVING, EXCEPTIONAL PERFORMANCES. MEMORABLE AND WELL WORTH WATCHING. GOOD SCORE, WELL DIRECTED.
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