Vodka Lemon Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
November 2, 2006
[font=Century Gothic]"Vodka Lemon" takes place in Armenia where Hamo(Romen Avinian) is an aging widower who visits his wife's grave everyday, keeping her informed of what is going on in his life. Currently, his son, Kamo, is in Paris looking for work and is not able to send any money back home. Disappointed, Hamo is forced to sell his prized wardrobe. Also at the cemetary, is Nina(Lala Sarkissian), a middle-aged women who cannot make ends meet even though she works as a bartender.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]"Vodka Lemon" is a droll movie made in the tradition of Kusturica and Kaurismaki about an Armerian village that is still struggling about ten years after the fall of the Soviet Union.(The resplendent location filming during winter helps.) Actually, the movie may be a little nostalgiac for the time before Armenia became independent. At least, the bus service is frequent and there is still hope. [/font]
December 14, 2006
Ode to every parent whose children disappoint. Ode to englishe language marketing in eastern europe and japan. Ode to snow. Ode to Vodka, the good stuff. Ode to, well, how life totally sucks if your live in a cold Eastern European country. Hit the bottle and try not to turn yellow (stay away from the Russian stuff).
March 31, 2012
Lovely for us to see a community like the village where we lived in Azerbaijan in 1997. Awful bore for the children.
December 3, 2009
This is a very slow movie. It is really hard to get into it. You either can or can't. If you can't you will probably hate the film. I actually enjoyed the story and the dialog used. The cast was fun and entertaining. But like I said, the movie is slow. I believe that is why it was hard for me to give it a great rating. But the whole concept of how these people live in this little town seemed to amaze me.
½ February 7, 2007
It is actually a very good movie! It is sad and dramatic.

I was very surprised when reading American critics' reviews. They seemed to like the movie - the Tomatometer shows 93%. But it seems to me, that unfortunately many-many people failed to understand this movie.

You see, seriously... it is not a "dream"-movie, there are no exaggerations. It is real life. For people, living in the west and reading about post-communist countries only in the newspapers, it is difficult to understand many things in this movie, I think.

I was surprised to see the words "comedy", "black humour", "absurd". I am sorry, but it is a failure of understanding the movie. This is how people live actually. And not only in the Kurdish Armenia, you know. In poverty, but happily! Trying to find some happiness in every moment of their life.

It is not a comedy. I smiled a few times but it was not humour, it was very very real reflection of life. And of course, there was nothing absurd in that movie. To me (again, maybe I see a bit more from "our", "their" prospective) everything (!) seemed natural in the movie.

And I actually never thought before about the remaining importance of the Russian language in Caucasus. But of course, the Kurds and the Armenians will speak only Russian to each other. And to Georgians, and to Ingushs, and to Osetians.

And this movie could be worth seeing for the Western spectator to understand (finally) that yes, small nations maybe did not possess "freedom" in the USSR, but they had everything else. Not they have nothing except for "freedom". But what is freedom? A marking on the map? Or maybe wealth and life free of hunger was the real freedom?
A lonely house in a Kurdish village in the middle of nowhere could have had a piano during the Soviet times. It is not an exception, believe me, I know. The USSR might have brought a lot of pain to some people, but the breaking of the USSR brought a bigger pain to much more people.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
November 2, 2006
[font=Century Gothic]"Vodka Lemon" takes place in Armenia where Hamo(Romen Avinian) is an aging widower who visits his wife's grave everyday, keeping her informed of what is going on in his life. Currently, his son, Kamo, is in Paris looking for work and is not able to send any money back home. Disappointed, Hamo is forced to sell his prized wardrobe. Also at the cemetary, is Nina(Lala Sarkissian), a middle-aged women who cannot make ends meet even though she works as a bartender.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]"Vodka Lemon" is a droll movie made in the tradition of Kusturica and Kaurismaki about an Armerian village that is still struggling about ten years after the fall of the Soviet Union.(The resplendent location filming during winter helps.) Actually, the movie may be a little nostalgiac for the time before Armenia became independent. At least, the bus service is frequent and there is still hope. [/font]
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