Heading South Reviews

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch
September 30, 2006
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Steve Murray
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
September 23, 2006
Exploring female desire in a way films rarely do, Heading South is a film of sometimes subtle, sometimes blunt metaphors for the interaction of rich and pauperized countries.
Full Review | Original Score: B-
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Colin Covert
Minneapolis Star Tribune
September 7, 2006
The regal Rampling has never been finer, and Cesar makes his character surprisingly proud and sympathetic.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle
September 1, 2006
The film offers something unusual, a tragic spectacle of normal, recognizable and utterly sympathetic people condemning themselves.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Tom Keogh
Seattle Times
August 25, 2006
An unsettling drama by the director of two other remarkable films about class illusions, Human Resources and Time Out.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Kerry Lengel
Arizona Republic
August 18, 2006
The movie avoids devolving into polemic by treating its characters as individuals.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
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Stephen Hunter
Washington Post
August 17, 2006
In its way, the film is a piercing indictment, though it makes its point without much screaming, hectoring or preening. It's quietly terrific.
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Michael Wilmington
Chicago Tribune
August 17, 2006
At 60, with three 2006 releases in the can, Rampling still seems an international treasure, a great camera subject and a truly daring actress.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
August 4, 2006
Boasts another formidable and fine-tuned performance from the great Charlotte Rampling.
| Original Score: 3.5/4
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Ty Burr
Boston Globe
August 4, 2006
A nervy but muddleheaded work ... with sharply unpleasant things to say about the First World's moral strip-mining of the Third but an overly tactful way of saying them.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Joe Morgenstern
Wall Street Journal
July 21, 2006
Cantet's fascinating, troubling drama has many meanings.
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Carina Chocano
Los Angeles Times
July 20, 2006
The women are meant to level the emotional playing field and add depth to what is, at heart, a story about the exploitation of poor nations by rich and powerful ones. But they wind up being too bitter and unstable to elicit much sympathy.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Ella Taylor
L.A. Weekly
July 20, 2006
Heading South is an absorbing extension of Cantet's abiding obsession with the seeding of political inequality in intimate relations.
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Rex Reed
New York Observer
July 19, 2006
The film is too slow for my taste, but for perfectly formed characters and authentic human conflict, Heading South is beautifully written, carefully photographed and eventually devastating.
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Lisa Schwarzbaum
Entertainment Weekly
July 12, 2006
What is surprising is the delicacy with which Rampling and Cantet -- himself better known as a chronicler of men -- create a character of such potent feminine hunger.
Full Review | Original Score: A-
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Stephanie Zacharek
Salon.com
July 7, 2006
Heading South is a seemingly straightforward and simple picture that's really defiantly complex, sexually, politically and emotionally.
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Stephen Whitty
Newark Star-Ledger
July 7, 2006
In Laurent Cantet's fine new film Heading South, the amorous travelers aren't men but well-heeled, middle-aged women from North America, and their playground is lawless Haiti.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
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Kyle Smith
New York Post
July 7, 2006
A powerful cocktail of not just sex and love but race, poverty, colonialism and jealousy.
| Original Score: 3.5/4
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Jack Mathews
New York Daily News
July 7, 2006
A well-acted but misguided tale of displaced sexual longing on the beaches of Baby Doc Duvalier's 1970s Haiti.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Peter Rainer
Christian Science Monitor
July 6, 2006
The new film by Laurent Cantet (Human Resources and the masterpiece Time Out) is evocative and disturbing.
Full Review | Original Score: B
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Stephen Holden
New York Times
July 6, 2006
Laurent Cantet's devastating new film contemplates the darker social undercurrents beneath a seemingly benign example of sexual tourism. examination of middle-age desire.
| Original Score: 4.5/5
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Noel Murray
AV Club
July 6, 2006
But though the women talk a lot about the soul-changing effects of great sex, Cantet largely steers clear of cinematic sensuality, making his heroines' satisfaction -- and the way it exploits the poor -- primarily theoretical.
Full Review | Original Score: C+
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Wally Hammond
Time Out
July 6, 2006
It's a delight; an entertaining, moving, audacious and stimulating conversation about happiness, love, jealousy, fear, race, sex, class, and social and colonial oppression -- in short, the relationship between the personal and the political.
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J. Hoberman
Village Voice
July 5, 2006
An intelligent movie, not so much salacious as affecting but ultimately less analytical than overwrought...
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Jay Weissberg
Variety
February 3, 2006
Albert's bitterness deserved further development, but the real puzzle is why Cantet doesn't let Legba have a say.
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Susan Walker
Toronto Star
February 3, 2006
Cantet never finds the keys to his characters in Heading South and fails to give them life beyond the politicized representations imposed on them by Laferrière.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Rick Groen
Globe and Mail
February 3, 2006
Suffering from a surfeit of addled ambition, it's intellectually feverish but dramatically languid, one of those overreaching movies that tries awfully hard to seem deep but ends up as shallow as a tide pool.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4