17 Girls Reviews

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Tired of Previews
Super Reviewer
January 14, 2013
Question: Do you remember when you were a teenager? You thought you knew everything; the world evolved around you and your friends; boredom was the norm and finding anything exciting to do was one of your only priorities. The consequences of your actions were so unknown and incomprehensible that driving fast, smoking, experimenting with illegal narcotics, and drinking alcohol was so common place with you or your friends or both. Luckily you survived the angst of your teenage years fairly unscathed. Now you are a parent, and the panic sets in when your child(ren) become teenagers because now you know better. It's the cycle of life.

Now I have just viewed a film that made my heart hurt at the lack of common sense of a group of teenage girls. The film is 17 Girls, a French film based on the true story of a group of 16 year-olds who all became pregnant at the same time, on purpose. The reasoning for this "pregnancy pact" left me scratching my head at what we did wrong as a society or as parents that led these girls to thinking this idea was a good one.

17 Girls is a fantasy film, in a sense. It appeared to ignore what really happens to females when they become pregnant. Morning sickness, hormonal changes that lead to major mood swings, food cravings and a desire to eat and be healthy were all missing. These girls smoked (cigarettes and hash), drank alcohol, always appeared happy, unless they weren't pregnant or if they were alone at home.

But one thing in the film that was appeared accurate: these teenagers had a tendency to blame their parents for their unhappiness. It seemed appropriate because it's the age where girls are on the cusp of adulthood - a precarious and vulnerable stage. It's a rite of passage, of sorts. I am not saying their behavior to get knocked-up was appropriate. Many of the girls in 17 Girls blamed their current circumstances (boredom) on their parents because they worked, leaving them alone and couldn't bow to all their needs and wants. It's not easy becoming an adult when you are still stuck in the mentality of a child. I will say it again: it's a vulnerable stage.

So, become pregnant, have your own child and freedom (and happiness) will come...yep, that's what these girls thought. My head is still spinning at the concept. Too many moral, ethical, sociological questions surfaced while watching the interpretation of the real situation. And when it got to the end, well, the story might leave you a bit angry - especially at the main girl who started the pact.

As stated before, this is based on a true story - an American one actually. The film probably took a lot of liberties but I believe the essence is the same. The filmmaker of 17 Girls told on an unique tale without shoving their stance on the matter. A refreshing approach to a story that will make you think deeply about society and its responsibility or lack thereof. Bravo!

Review: 8 out of 10
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ May 2, 2014
In "17 Girls," high schooler Camille(Louise Grinberg) is pregnant. This puts her already difficult relationship with her mother(Florence Thomassin) on even rockier ground. But Camille's friends are all happy for her. Then Florence(Roxane Duran) also gets pregnant. So, the other members of Camille's clique decide to get pregnant together, starting with a party on a Saturday night with Clementine(Yara Pilartz) about the only one not finding a partner. With a rash of pregnancies, the adults go into lockdown mode before going nuclear with the childbirthing videos.(Oh no, not that!)

"17 Girls" handles a difficult subject delicately with grace, grounding its story(inspired by real events) in the realities of a small seaside city where the cultural highlight is eating at the local Chez Mac. In this milieu, all the girls have are each other, with the clueless adults failing the kids and not the other way around. At the same time, the movie can be dreamlike, not only philsophically but also aesthetically. While a montage of ultrasounds is a highlight, the freeze frame portraits are a little too artsy.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ May 2, 2014
In "17 Girls," high schooler Camille(Louise Grinberg) is pregnant. This puts her already difficult relationship with her mother(Florence Thomassin) on even rockier ground. But Camille's friends are all happy for her. Then Florence(Roxane Duran) also gets pregnant. So, the other members of Camille's clique decide to get pregnant together, starting with a party on a Saturday night with Clementine(Yara Pilartz) about the only one not finding a partner. With a rash of pregnancies, the adults go into lockdown mode before going nuclear with the childbirthing videos.(Oh no, not that!)

"17 Girls" handles a difficult subject delicately with grace, grounding its story(inspired by real events) in the realities of a small seaside city where the cultural highlight is eating at the local Chez Mac. In this milieu, all the girls have are each other, with the clueless adults failing the kids and not the other way around. At the same time, the movie can be dreamlike, not only philsophically but also aesthetically. While a montage of ultrasounds is a highlight, the freeze frame portraits are a little too artsy.
½ October 15, 2013
Very interesting to watch the "French" version...
Tired of Previews
Super Reviewer
January 14, 2013
Question: Do you remember when you were a teenager? You thought you knew everything; the world evolved around you and your friends; boredom was the norm and finding anything exciting to do was one of your only priorities. The consequences of your actions were so unknown and incomprehensible that driving fast, smoking, experimenting with illegal narcotics, and drinking alcohol was so common place with you or your friends or both. Luckily you survived the angst of your teenage years fairly unscathed. Now you are a parent, and the panic sets in when your child(ren) become teenagers because now you know better. It's the cycle of life.

Now I have just viewed a film that made my heart hurt at the lack of common sense of a group of teenage girls. The film is 17 Girls, a French film based on the true story of a group of 16 year-olds who all became pregnant at the same time, on purpose. The reasoning for this "pregnancy pact" left me scratching my head at what we did wrong as a society or as parents that led these girls to thinking this idea was a good one.

17 Girls is a fantasy film, in a sense. It appeared to ignore what really happens to females when they become pregnant. Morning sickness, hormonal changes that lead to major mood swings, food cravings and a desire to eat and be healthy were all missing. These girls smoked (cigarettes and hash), drank alcohol, always appeared happy, unless they weren't pregnant or if they were alone at home.

But one thing in the film that was appeared accurate: these teenagers had a tendency to blame their parents for their unhappiness. It seemed appropriate because it's the age where girls are on the cusp of adulthood - a precarious and vulnerable stage. It's a rite of passage, of sorts. I am not saying their behavior to get knocked-up was appropriate. Many of the girls in 17 Girls blamed their current circumstances (boredom) on their parents because they worked, leaving them alone and couldn't bow to all their needs and wants. It's not easy becoming an adult when you are still stuck in the mentality of a child. I will say it again: it's a vulnerable stage.

So, become pregnant, have your own child and freedom (and happiness) will come...yep, that's what these girls thought. My head is still spinning at the concept. Too many moral, ethical, sociological questions surfaced while watching the interpretation of the real situation. And when it got to the end, well, the story might leave you a bit angry - especially at the main girl who started the pact.

As stated before, this is based on a true story - an American one actually. The film probably took a lot of liberties but I believe the essence is the same. The filmmaker of 17 Girls told on an unique tale without shoving their stance on the matter. A refreshing approach to a story that will make you think deeply about society and its responsibility or lack thereof. Bravo!

Review: 8 out of 10
November 13, 2012
i wanna watch this movie, does anyone have the link¿
October 19, 2012
Also OK. Interesting story but movie seemed to just scratch the surface of why this happened.
September 17, 2012
Its rediculous that these girls get famous and put in the spotlight for At best screwing up their freedom and at worst becoming welfare leeches.
August 28, 2012
If this is a true story then I don't want to live on this planet anymore.
April 14, 2012
muy buena! bastante mejor de lo que me imaginaba, la historia es de por si interesante y me gusta como esta abordada, además tiene buena música y un clima que me encanto.
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