A Burning Hot Summer Reviews

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Kent Jones
Film Comment Magazine
November 5, 2013
I have never seen a Garrel film untouched by grace, and A Burning Hot Summer is no exception.
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Walter V. Addiego
San Francisco Chronicle
July 20, 2012
While I have to acknowledge Garrel's skill, the film, which actually has its compelling moments, falls somewhat flat.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Drew Hunt
Chicago Reader
July 13, 2012
Garrel's work is indebted to silent cinema style, but his recent films have shown a real flair for dialogue too.
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Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
July 12, 2012
"A Burning Hot Summer" failed to persuade me of any reason for its existence.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post
June 29, 2012
There are spirited moments, notably Angèle's torrid dance with another man at a party. But the film's observations are surprisingly retrograde, even absurd.
Full Review | Original Score: 1.5/4
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Manohla Dargis
New York Times
June 28, 2012
Here and elsewhere you linger in moments that, like memories and dreams, can feel severed from storybook time.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
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Eric Hynes
Time Out
June 26, 2012
A Burning Hot Summer wisely knows when and how to surgically slice directly to the bone. It's a bad romance of the highest order.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
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Nick Schager
Village Voice
June 26, 2012
Although Angèle's religious faith and Frédéric's belief in luck seem like strained attempts at adding heft to the material, the film nevertheless works up a potent dramatic restlessness...
Ela Bittencourt
Slant Magazine
June 25, 2012
The Louis Garrel character's mixture of self-containment and alleged possessiveness over his wife fails to convince, if not to irritate.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
June 21, 2012
This existential-romantic roundelay barely simmers, and certainly doesn't scorch.
Fernando F. Croce
House Next Door
September 12, 2011
Though shot in swanky color, the film retains the alternately trying and invigorating starkness of the director's recent, black-and-white efforts.
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