nos amours (To Our Loves) (Suzanne) Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ August 23, 2012
Reminds me of being sixteen...
rubystevens
Super Reviewer
September 5, 2011
my first pialat film is a family drama starring a luminous young sandrine bonnaire as a rebellious teenager using sex with random boys to deal with her complicated issues. even more troubling is the sudden turn to violence within her family, especially her unstable mother and super creepy brother. all seems shockingly real with wonderful performances by the actors, not least pialat himself, who plays the soon estranged father. i'll definitely check more of his work in the future
Super Reviewer
January 29, 2011
Excellent, though a little hard to follow - I literally could not keep up with this girl and all her "boyfriends", and by the end half hour I was totally confused as to who she was meant to be with, and what was going on. I was drawn to this movie as I like 80's films in general, and though it's not a typical 80's film, it still has that feel to it, while also being kind of mysterious and beautifully filmed. Sandrine Bonnaire is perfect as Suzanne and I found her family intriguing as much as disturbing. This is one messed up family, and Suzanne seems unnaturally close to her father, whilst her brother is unnaturally close to her. Her mother is just half insane. No wonder she has a few issues!
There's not an awful lot happening in plot, but I never felt that it dragged or got dull.
Super Reviewer
December 27, 2009
It wasn't all that spectacular but it held my interest enough. The girl is very pretty and does a great acting job but the storyline bugs me a little.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
February 26, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]"A Nos Amours" is an intriguing, provocative and loosely structured movie about 16-year old Suzanne(Sandrine Bonnaire) who has sex with a series of men as a way of seeking freedom and escape.(Despite asking the right questions, there is little her parents can do to stop her.) It is quite possible she might be seeking escape from herself in the earliest scenes as she rehearses for a play during summer camp. What she wants to get away from the most is her provincial town and her parents' apartment(At the very least, her escapades allow her to get some fresh air.) where her father(Maurice Pialat, who also co-wrote and directed) tends business as a furrier. It is an increasingly tense household and Suzanne's erratic behavior does not help but in any case does not excuse her parents' physically striking her. She breaks up with her dutiful boyfriend Luc(Cyr Boitard) because if she stays with him, then she is afraid she will turn out exactly like her parents.[/font]
May 4, 2014
Sort of a rotten story, really, filled with unhappiness and horror. But the narrative is excellent, showing us how our protagonist gets from point A to point B, and how her troubled homelife helps to steer her there.

Sandrine Bonnaire sparkles on screen, a glimmer even when her relationships are crumbling at her feet.

This is probably a story that will hit too close to home for some viewers; the abusive family situation she is in is doubtlessly not as uncommon as we (societly) would like to think, nor are the emotional and psychological fallouts.
November 14, 2011
Wanted to love it and didn't, but it is kind of unique as a coming-of-age/family drama due to all the 15 year old sex and constant abuse. And yet it seems like the kind of movie you can take your grandmother to see... it's a slow-burner, and by that I mean it doesn't really get interesting till the father leaves the family.
½ August 27, 2010
This movie wasn't bad. It was quite slow, and I feel like it said some things that have already been said many times in film, however it did do it in a very interesting way. I loved the nearly utter lack of a soundtrack, and I thought the actors all did a splendid job. The plot was interesting enough to keep me awake throughout the full film.
½ December 23, 2009
Brutal, disturbing, yet strangely familiar (not the promiscuous part, just the dysfunctional family part). I enjoyed it, despite the unpleasantness of it all. Can both relate and not relate to the protagonist and her promiscuous ways.
½ February 25, 2015
Charming lead and great acting.
½ November 9, 2013
I can see why they call Maurice Pialat the John Cassavettes of French cinema. This is a wonderful drama about a girl's transition into adulthood and the distress it causes an already disintegrating family. There is a jump in time at the end of the movie where I was a bit lost, but otherwise amazing.
May 29, 2012
I find it dragging but seeing Sandrine Bonnaire playing that promiscuous and disturbed girl from a dysfunctional family is amazing.
½ May 5, 2011
I feel so much better about my family now
½ September 12, 2010
Quite a slow and uneventful film but it was done well and the script had its moments.
February 20, 2010
The best quote from this film comes from Pialat himself, playing the father in the film he played father to:

Roughly, "All of us desire to be loved, but only a select privileged few are actually truly capable of loving. You are not one of them." This is what he tells Bonnaire who plays his daughter. Pialat was reportedly very in love with Sandrine Bonnaire from the moment he serendipitously cast her instead of her sister for the lead role.

Pialat's films are tough to get good prints of in the US. Fortunately this one is of of his masterpieces and is available from Criterion in stunning transfer quality.

I had the privilege of seeing "Nous Ne Virillions Pas Ensemble" on a film print at the Dryden Theater in Rochester, NY a few years back. His technique does not patronize the viewer as he uses very few traditional film mechanisms - the films predominantly lack things like music scoring, edit dissolves to imply a lapse in time, or establishing shots. You are at the mercy of the characters you are watching and the situations they are in to pick up on a moment that you are abruptly thrown into which could take place a year down the road from the scene you just cleanly cut from.

But it works. The best filmmakers in history all had their muses, so much that the cinema has developed an almost mythological phenomena - a feminine Hollywood-like dream of a young woman discovered/plucked from an ordinary life and thrust into the passions of a brilliant director (something David Lynch deconstructs so brilliantly in "Mullholland Drive"). Sandrine Bonnaire became yet another a building block in that myth back in the 80s.

We do want to all be loved, and Pialat was certainly no exception - so if this film was the fruit of his passions, judge for yourself whether he is one of the privileged few with the ability to love another. Regardless, I love this film, and it isn't easy. So much so that I can't even give it 5 stars.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
February 26, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]"A Nos Amours" is an intriguing, provocative and loosely structured movie about 16-year old Suzanne(Sandrine Bonnaire) who has sex with a series of men as a way of seeking freedom and escape.(Despite asking the right questions, there is little her parents can do to stop her.) It is quite possible she might be seeking escape from herself in the earliest scenes as she rehearses for a play during summer camp. What she wants to get away from the most is her provincial town and her parents' apartment(At the very least, her escapades allow her to get some fresh air.) where her father(Maurice Pialat, who also co-wrote and directed) tends business as a furrier. It is an increasingly tense household and Suzanne's erratic behavior does not help but in any case does not excuse her parents' physically striking her. She breaks up with her dutiful boyfriend Luc(Cyr Boitard) because if she stays with him, then she is afraid she will turn out exactly like her parents.[/font]
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