Albatross Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ November 6, 2012
Decent movie. A little slow. Nice ending...
bbcfloridabound
Super Reviewer
October 10, 2012
Excellent movie free spirited girl meets strictly raised girl and the fun begins, all while the free spirited girl has an affair with girls father, my review sucks the movie is outstanding, a must see. 5 stars 10-1-12
LWOODS04
Super Reviewer
September 5, 2011
Cast: Felicity Jones, Jessica Brown-Findlay, Sebastian Koch, Julia Ormond, Harry Treadaway, Josef Altin

Director: Niall MacCormick

Summary: The studious life of Oxford-bound Beth is turned upside down when would-be novelist Emelia takes a job at the seaside hotel owned by Beth's family. But things get dicey when the free-spirited Emelia begins a fling with Beth's feckless father.

My Thoughts: "I enjoyed the characters more then I did the film itself, if that makes sense. The problem I had was the relationship that unfolds between Emeilia and Johnathan. I just didn't like it nor did I really think it was necessary. Being a daddy's girl myself, I thought Beth and her father's relationship was sweet. Her mother was a, well I don't wanna use such vulgar words considering I have been warned. But you must know what I was gonig to say. *cough bitch* : } Emeilia is my favorite character in the movie because I seem to lean towards the more tortured souls. Although she is smart and has a talent for writing, she is stuck. Stuck with no real education, since she was kicked out of school, and stuck taking care of her grandparents and with dead end jobs. So you want to root for her and for things to get better for her as well. I liked Beth as well, and the two together had a nice balanced friendship. Great acting and characters with an OK story-line makes this movie worth seeing at least once."
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ September 5, 2013
"Albatross" starts with a kiss between Emilia Conan Doyle(Jessica Brown Findlay) and Jake(Harry Treadaway) before the firecrackers. That explains why Emilia gets to ride in a police car on the way to her first day of work as a maid at a guesthouse where Beth(Felicity Jones) is tending the front desk while studying, so her dad(Sebastian Koch) can pretend he is writing upstairs while actually masturbating. So, it is a surprise to Beth's mother(Julia Ormond) that Emilia gets invited round to dinner, to which she brings a bottle of wine that she flashed her ID for.

"Albatross" starts promisingly enough but then stalls in a sea of quirkiness. That's not to mention going the old tired route of a disruptive force introduced to a family going nowhere and liberating everybody. And with predictable results. Plus stereotypes. The writing angle might have had a chance if played correctly which it isn't as it is thrown to the curbside in the most desultory manner imaginable. Instead, it seems all the characters are suffering under the weight of the past, especially Beth who has to deal with her parents. However, the actors do a good job trying to breathe life into such cliches while very much out of their usual comfort zones. Nice scenery, though.
themoviewaffler.com
Super Reviewer
February 29, 2012
There are two things British films do well; grit and charm, and this has oodles of the latter without a hint of schmaltz or sentimentality. "Downton Abbey" star Jessica Brown Findlay and Felicity Jones are two teens who become friends over a summer in a small coastal town. Little does Jones know but Findlay is shagging her father, a writer living off the success of a twenty year old novel, played brilliantly by the great German actor Sebastian Koch. Findlay and Jones absolutely glow on screen and I predict these two are going to become household names very soon.
Super Reviewer
April 29, 2012
Albatross is your basic coming-of-age story made only slightly less average by a young and strong female cast of Jessica Brown-Findlay and Felicity Jones, both of whom remain in control of their performances.
August 19, 2014
Sometimes I watch a film and find myself pleasantly surprised to like it far more than I had expected to. There are also occasions where I end up hating a film far more than I ever imagined. Albatross is such a film. A dramedy about a lower-class troubled yet brilliant spirit who becomes a maid at a family-owned hotel and changes all their lives. And she "changes their lives" by starting an affair with the father and almost destroying the life of the teenage daughter. The main character, played b Jessica Brown Findlay, is insufferable and terrible mess of a character. The film clearly admires her, but she's every self-indulgent writing cliche all put into one character. She's rude, but kind. She's a party-girl, but she's cultured. She's young, but wise beyond her years. She's shallow, but she's a reader of great literature. The film clearly can't pick an identity for her, and yet she's the main focus of the film. And she's writing a novel, which I never once found plausible. She's a terrible person, and yet the film tells us that we should aspire to be more like her. It's a flaw that could sink any film. Yet Albatross helps by being also unfunny and kind of mean-spirited. None of the other characters get any adequate development or story arcs. Ultimately the film has no insight or profundity at all. Albatross is a tone-deaf, horrifying example of a film.
August 13, 2014
Sometimes I watch a film and find myself pleasantly surprised to like it far more than I had expected to. There are also occasions where I end up hating a film far more than I ever imagined. Albatross is such a film. A dramedy about a lower-class troubled yet brilliant spirit who becomes a maid at a family-owned hotel and changes all their lives. And she "changes their lives" by starting an affair with the father and almost destroying the life of the teenage daughter. The main character, played b Jessica Brown Findlay, is insufferable and terrible mess of a character. The film clearly admires her, but she's every self-indulgent writing cliche all put into one character. She's rude, but kind. She's a party-girl, but she's cultured. She's young, but wise beyond her years. She's shallow, but she's a reader of great literature. The film clearly can't pick an identity for her, and yet she's the main focus of the film. And she's writing a novel, which I never once found plausible. She's a terrible person, and yet the film tells us that we should aspire to be more like her. It's a flaw that could sink any film. Yet Albatross helps by being also unfunny and kind of mean-spirited. None of the other characters get any adequate development or story arcs. Ultimately the film has no insight or profundity at all. Albatross is a tone-deaf, horrifying example of a film.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ September 5, 2013
"Albatross" starts with a kiss between Emilia Conan Doyle(Jessica Brown Findlay) and Jake(Harry Treadaway) before the firecrackers. That explains why Emilia gets to ride in a police car on the way to her first day of work as a maid at a guesthouse where Beth(Felicity Jones) is tending the front desk while studying, so her dad(Sebastian Koch) can pretend he is writing upstairs while actually masturbating. So, it is a surprise to Beth's mother(Julia Ormond) that Emilia gets invited round to dinner, to which she brings a bottle of wine that she flashed her ID for.

"Albatross" starts promisingly enough but then stalls in a sea of quirkiness. That's not to mention going the old tired route of a disruptive force introduced to a family going nowhere and liberating everybody. And with predictable results. Plus stereotypes. The writing angle might have had a chance if played correctly which it isn't as it is thrown to the curbside in the most desultory manner imaginable. Instead, it seems all the characters are suffering under the weight of the past, especially Beth who has to deal with her parents. However, the actors do a good job trying to breathe life into such cliches while very much out of their usual comfort zones. Nice scenery, though.
½ June 22, 2013
Good Movie Showing How Lies Can Effect People
March 26, 2013
What a nice surprise. Funny and sad at the same time. Jessica Bown-Findlay is amazing and I have a huge crush on Sebastian Koch so watch everything he's in!
½ January 17, 2013
What do you get when acclaimed director Niall MacCormick directs a coming of age tale starring Felicity Jones? Not much, I'm afraid.

Coming of age stories are a popular and enjoyable film topic that British writers and directors so often excel at. Not so with this predictable, clumsy script, which meanders along like a wet Sunday.

The occasional witty or touching moment isn't enough to rescue what feels like a made-for-tv melodrama.

It's too bad for budding actress Jessica Brown-Findlay, as she might possess a special spark if cast in something a little more outstanding.
October 3, 2012
Summary- Seventeen year old girl, wears a conservative, repressed wardrobe which is indicative of her personality and demeanor. Said teen, meets a 'rebel without a clue,' provocative dressing, teen girl friend. Said teen girl, much to the chagrin of her mother, and pleasure of her father, adopts a slutty wardrobe. The "earth shattering ending" involves said teen wearing an "I Put Out" tee-shirt, with a little, female, firefighter, beneath that banner. Sad.
May 31, 2012
Mystic Pizza would definitely rate above this,even.
½ May 13, 2012
Like the film's main character, Emelia (played by Downton Abbey's Jessica Brown-Findlay), Albatross "comes around by the end"; but it isn't one that really merits a watch. This is a little Brit indie coming-of-age tale which brought to mind the better little Brit indie Tamara Drewe (if that title means anything to you and you liked it I'd recommend watching this; but if it means nothing than this one won't either). Described as a cross between My Summer of Love and An Education (this latter is a FAR superior film!), Albatross is about a wayward and lost Emelia who wishes to write a great novel and become an inspired writer just like her ancestor, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who wrote Sherlock Holmes etc.). The problem is that Emelia has no real guidance as she lives with her elder and ailing grandparents, she cannot keep a job and has run-ins with the law ... until she takes a job as a cleaning girl at a local bed-and-breakfast operated by a one-time-wonder writer and his family. Emelia befriends their teenage daughter Beth (Felicity Jones who could have been nominated for an Oscar last year for a great turn in Like Crazy), clashes with the wife/mother Joa (Julia Ormond - Legends of the Fall, My Week with Marilyn) and begins a troubling and unfortunate affair with the writer/father Jonathan (Sebastian Koch - Black Book, Unknown). Jonathan suffers from a severe case of writers block and apparently is in dire need of some sort of inspiration ... which he finds with the young, beautiful and flirty newcomer. Emelia and Beth become "friends" throughout the film and the relationship is mostly one-sided as it is clear that Beth is being used. As I had written, though, Emelia "comes around" and isn't pleased with her self-realization ... it is what she does after all of this that can make the film worthwhile. Jones and Findlay-Brown are both up-and-comers in the British film world ... and for good reason. I believe the word/term "albatross" is only mentioned once in the film; but there are several allusions made to it throughout. We all have something tied around our necks ... and that is what this film is about. What is holding us back? It is unfortanate that just about everything holds this film back (although it does have a decent cast) because it's all been done/seen before and there is no real reason to recommend it. Luckily it isn't a "waste of time" which would have one requesting the hour-and-a-half runtime of their life back ... one can get a few feathers (insignificant as they might be) out of this.
May 6, 2012
The beach scene from Albatross made me smile real hard.
Super Reviewer
April 29, 2012
Albatross is your basic coming-of-age story made only slightly less average by a young and strong female cast of Jessica Brown-Findlay and Felicity Jones, both of whom remain in control of their performances.
themoviewaffler.com
Super Reviewer
February 29, 2012
There are two things British films do well; grit and charm, and this has oodles of the latter without a hint of schmaltz or sentimentality. "Downton Abbey" star Jessica Brown Findlay and Felicity Jones are two teens who become friends over a summer in a small coastal town. Little does Jones know but Findlay is shagging her father, a writer living off the success of a twenty year old novel, played brilliantly by the great German actor Sebastian Koch. Findlay and Jones absolutely glow on screen and I predict these two are going to become household names very soon.
February 24, 2012
Directed by BAFTA-nominated Niall MacCormick (Margaret Thatcher: The Long Road to Finchley), Albatross is a funny and moving coming-of-age story starring Sebastian Koch (The Lives of Others, Black Book), Felicity Jones (Cemetery Junction), Julia Ormond (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button) and newcomer Jessica Brown-Findlay, a leading light in Screen International's prestigious UK Stars of Tomorrow list. My Summer of Love meets An Education, the film tells the story of a family whose world is ...
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