All is Forgiven (Tout est pardonnÚ) Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
March 16, 2011
"All Is Forgiven" starts in Vienna in 1995 as Victor(Paul Blain) and Annette(Marie-Christine Friedrich) celebrate the sixth birthday of their daughter Pamela(Victoire Rousseau). As well as things might seem, he slips away for an appointment with his drug dealer. Things do not go any better on Victor's home turf of Paris where his drug use continues, along with his writer's block which he confesses to his sister Martine(Carole Franck). And things are only about to get worse for Victor...

"All Is Forgiven" is a poignant and deeply affecting movie with a nicely ambiguous ending. As writer-director Mia Hansen-Love pointed out in introducing the movie, it is about the passage of time. The movie is broken up into two halves with a deft transition in focus. Unlike the buildings and other structures referenced(just a quick reminder to never tell a child about collapsing bridges because then you will have to deal with her nightmares), people require much more sensitive and complex repairs, as they attempt to move forward with their lives. What may have been done for the best intentions at the time, may have ramifications for all concerned down the road. So, do people really change over time? And is love just another drug?
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
March 16, 2011
"All Is Forgiven" starts in Vienna in 1995 as Victor(Paul Blain) and Annette(Marie-Christine Friedrich) celebrate the sixth birthday of their daughter Pamela(Victoire Rousseau). As well as things might seem, he slips away for an appointment with his drug dealer. Things do not go any better on Victor's home turf of Paris where his drug use continues, along with his writer's block which he confesses to his sister Martine(Carole Franck). And things are only about to get worse for Victor...

"All Is Forgiven" is a poignant and deeply affecting movie with a nicely ambiguous ending. As writer-director Mia Hansen-Love pointed out in introducing the movie, it is about the passage of time. The movie is broken up into two halves with a deft transition in focus. Unlike the buildings and other structures referenced(just a quick reminder to never tell a child about collapsing bridges because then you will have to deal with her nightmares), people require much more sensitive and complex repairs, as they attempt to move forward with their lives. What may have been done for the best intentions at the time, may have ramifications for all concerned down the road. So, do people really change over time? And is love just another drug?
Page 1 of 1