A Beautiful Mind Reviews

Page 2 of 11
Top Critic
Anthony Lane
New Yorker
February 24, 2013
Crowe pulls out the stops, but he looks too bullish and controlled for such a pitiable victim.
Top Critic
Richard Schickel
TIME Magazine
February 24, 2013
The result is mainstream moviemaking at its highest, most satisfying level.
Matthew Pejkovic
Matt's Movie Reviews
January 5, 2012
Cynics will hate it, but others will rightfully see it as a great cinematic accomplishment which is backed by excellent performances, great direction, a moving score and exquisite cinematography.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Nell Minow
Common Sense Media
September 30, 2010
Oscar-winning biopic is too intense for tweens.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
Nick Rogers
Suite101.com
September 25, 2010
Crowe, Goldsman and Howard aren't trying to solicit love or tears for John Nash, as detractors bitterly claimed. "A Beautiful Mind" sought only acknowledgement of the silent, invisible and brave struggle that so many with mental illnesses endure each day.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Felix Vasquez Jr.
Cinema Crazed
April 29, 2009
A masterpiece.

Film4
February 20, 2008
A typical Oscars movie. Solid, middle-brow and worthy.
Top Critic
Todd McCarthy
Variety
January 28, 2008
Consistently engrossing as an unusual character study and as a trip to the mysterious border-crossing between rarified brilliance and madness.
Rob Gonsalves
eFilmCritic.com
July 23, 2007
I can't deny how solidly it's crafted, how well-acted, and, wonder of wonders, how intelligently written and directed.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Joe Lozito
Big Picture Big Sound
July 14, 2007
I particularly enjoyed the fact that Nash comes across as quite fallible in the film despite his attempts at perfection. His character in the film is as unpredictable as I would expect the real Nash to be.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Philip French
Observer [UK]
February 6, 2007
Unfortunately, as the picture goes on, the haunting of Nash by figments of his troubled mind becomes a trifle simplistic.
Top Critic
Lisa Alspector
Chicago Reader
February 6, 2007
Director Ron Howard's deftness in suggesting the subjective experience of Crowe's character, who's later diagnosed with schizophrenia, makes for inspirational narrative, but certain plot points are so reductive.
Adam Smith
Empire Magazine
December 30, 2006
If this were fiction, it would be an example of superior storytelling, and it's certainly gripping.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Wesley Lovell
Cinema Sight
December 27, 2006
A pedestrian film with a rudimentary script that forces the actors to create believability where there might otherwise be none.
| Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Tom Charity
Time Out
January 26, 2006
At its most effective when it seems to lose the plot in a scrambled second act that posits the Cold War as a collective paranoid delusion, the film reverts to type (and to fact) for a sentimental anti-climax.
Jeffrey Overstreet
Looking Closer
December 6, 2004
It presents itself as a biography of the flesh-and-blood John Nash. And in fact, it is really only a flashy, sentimental Hollywood movie, inspired by a few particular details of the John Nash story.
Full Review | Original Score: C
Mark Sells
Oregon Herald
August 13, 2004
In every facet, it should have an automatic date with Oscar.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
Judith Egerton
Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY)
June 25, 2004
Crowe...disappears into the character just as he did when he played tobacco whistleblower Jeffrey Wigand in The Insider.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Charlie Brown
FilmStew.com
February 1, 2004
A tedious exercise in manipulation that once again proves Hollywood is short of vision.
Greg Maki
Star-Democrat (Easton, MD)
January 7, 2004
... Crowe disappears into the role of John Nash and proves again that he is one of today's most versatile actors.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Page 2 of 11