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Breakfast at Tiffany's Reviews

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Alice S

Super Reviewer

December 25, 2013
A favorite movie of mine since high school. I do love the idea of enjoying a place for its character and not necessarily for purchasing its wares. My Tiffany's is White Castle, though I still do purchase plenty of their delicious, miniature wares and frequent their Valentine's Day extravaganzas.

The dialogue is naughty yet oblique enough for its time; Cat is cute and sad; George Peppard is dreamy as all-get-out; and Henry Mancini's iconic score is playful and mischievous. I prefer Marilyn Monroe to Audrey Hepburn in general, but I can't deny that the latter brings a level of sophistication and class that the former wouldn't have if she had been cast as Holly Golightly, which Truman Capote wanted her to be.

Seeing this again for the first time in a long time though has opened my eyes to an unsettling revelation: Holly Golightly is probably the first [gasp] Manic Pixie Dreamgirl! I've grown weary of the can't-be-tamed caged bird trope that has become a cliche pop culture identity with Karen Gillan's Amy Pond on "Doctor Who" and various other "too fucked up to love me" girls. I used to identify strongly with the winsome and mercurial Holly Golightly and she's still a rather complex and memorable character, but perhaps my impatience for the literary/filmic type has retroactively soured her for me.
Carlos M

Super Reviewer

December 28, 2010
This adorable blend of romance, comedy and sweetness includes several new narrative elements and significant alterations in the original story that only add to it making it even more delightful - and even if miscast, Hepburn surprises with a very special performance.
Julie B

Super Reviewer

June 24, 2013
Re-watching this reminded me how lovely, charming, and horribly racist this is. We really used to do that in movies, huh? If you can look past the choices of the times, there is a great heart under there.
Jan Marc M

Super Reviewer

September 10, 2011
Breakfast At Tiffany's is a timeless charming classic starring timeless beauty and style icon Audrey Hepburn. Beautiful and beloved musical score Henry Mancini's Moon River.
murphmann93
murphmann93

Super Reviewer

June 23, 2011
A classic and one of my all time favourite films!
Ross C

Super Reviewer

May 28, 2011
Audrey Hepburn is captivating as the happy-go-lucky New York socialite, but I really feel movie making hadn't really progressed beyond traditional theatre at this stage. It feels like a play, mostly with indoor sets and a simple plot, with the direction being a bit OTT at times, as well as the foreign caricatures. Plus the theme song just doesn't feel right for this movie, it's like they just randomly assigned such great songs as Moon River to big movies. Amusing to see the young version of the A-team's Hannibal.
Luke B

Super Reviewer

February 3, 2011
Breakfast At Tiffany's is an absolute classic. The opening scene had me intrigued at once. It felt like an ending to a movie. The gentle and soft chords of Moon River playing, as a cab pulls up. This really felt as though it was early morning. There was already a lot of sadness and charm in these few opening shots. As the film progresses, we follow a woman on a self destructive path. She seems so free, but really she is trapped by her efforts to try and remain free. Hepburn is gorgeous and charming, but also sympathetic. She does well to make her lifestyle seem appealing, but then pushes us away with her attacks on those close to her. The dialogue and humor in this film are excellent. Some of the dialogue seems so modern, such as the chit-chat between Fred Baby and the Tiffany's Clerk. It's casual, honest, and cleverly comments on the story itself. It all looks good and sounds good. We also have some of the best feline performances of all time. The cats that played Cat, and their animal trainer, should all be saluted. The cat is great at interactions, and just being awesome. This isn't just a cat that sits around. The ending is something so soft, but cruel, that it's a relief to see something so well handled. A moment that helps the characters and audience realise something, without being cheesy. Apart from Rooney's ill-judged performance, this film is perfect.
Jay H

Super Reviewer

January 22, 2011
Audrey Hepburn is the type of actress we just don't see anymore. She makes this film the fine picture it is with her unique, intricate portrayal of one of the most remarkable characters in film history. With a subtle, well-timed score accenting the emotional moments of the film, the film is a fun, romantic classic to be enjoyed by all.
paul o.
paul o.

Super Reviewer

January 5, 2011
Something about Audrey Hepburn made me smile throughout the whole movie. Her smile, her acting, and her silly sense of humor were probably all a part in this. The story was different from other movies ive seen from the 60's and the music was genius from Henry Mancini. Its very well worth watching with its quick dialogue and its somewhat obscure characters.
AJ V

Super Reviewer

September 5, 2010
I can see why people think this movie and it's main character are a classic on the surface, but when you really think about it, this movie is just another romantic comedy, and the story isn't all that great either. Personally I didn't understand Hepburn's character, but she does represent a certain lifestyle of the sixties. This movie is pretty good but the story could be better, and it could be funnier.
Daniel P

Super Reviewer

June 18, 2007
Is this is a satire? Or are we to take Holly Golightly seriously? Is she a hero or an anti-hero? Are we rooting for her? How many more questions can I ask before I start answering them?

I can see why this film is considered a classic: it's a sensitive and beautifully-shot love story that employs Mancini's soundtrack (read: Moon River) to a stunning effect. Hepburn is captivating in her career-defining role. But on the whole, I just couldn't get behind her. I wish that something in the film would tell me if that's ok. Should we root for her? Or should we see this as an indictment of upwardly-mobile American society? Should we see the ending as a sign that all any dreamer really needs is a swift kick in the pants?

It's almost a masterpiece - its best moments are among the best best moments in film history. But I can't develop any sympathy for Holly - like Paul, I think she needs to pull her head out of her behind and quit living as "a phony". Gorgeous film, entertaining, but one that leaves many more questions than answers.

Oh, and two final thoughts. (1) Mickey Rooney's character... wow. Racist. Reminds me of Long Duk Dong in Sixteen Candles... which brings me to (2): this is John Hughes's favourite film ever, right? It has to be...
Lewis C

Super Reviewer

March 3, 2008
"You call yourself a free spirit, a wild thing, and you're terrified somebody's gonna stick you in a cage. Well baby, you're already in that cage. You built it yourself."

Now this is what I like to see. Breakfast at Tiffany's is one of those classic movies that has a great legacy so many years later because it's just that good. This is the iconic Hepburn movie for a reason.

Audrey makes a great Holly Golightly, and it's even more impressive when you consider how different the outgoing, flighty character is from how the actress was in real life. Her chemistry on-screen with George Peppard is immediate, and makes the whole convoluted relationship between the two work. And immensely satisfying in the end.

Watching Breakfast at Tiffany's really highlights how pale in comparison these kinds of movies have become in recent years. Check it out. It leads you in a lot of different directions, and you'll enjoy every turn and twist.
MeetMeinMontauk
MeetMeinMontauk

Super Reviewer

May 24, 2009
I once saw this on a plane to Italy. I don't remember liking it a whole lot, but considering my recent furthered love of Miss Hepburn, I'm going to have to give it another watch.
Second watch: Okay, A LOT better than I originally thought.... Loved the story, I really want to read the book now! I loved the superficiality of class and wealth. However I wonder the cat was not listed in the cast, what an amazing cast. But Mickey Rooney as an Asian man is all kinds of racially offensive.... just saying...
Mr Awesome
Mr Awesome

Super Reviewer

May 10, 2010
Based on a novel by Truman Capote, Breakfast at Tiffany's is the sweet story of a wild child girl with the unlikely name "Holly Golightly" (Audrey Hepburn) who befriends the "kept" writer neighbor next door. It's a sophisticated movie for it's time, and I can see it inspiring films such as The Graduate. Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard are both excellent, but it's the supporting cast, Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen, Martin Balsam, that really stand out with their performances. Holly doesn't believe in love, seeking only to marry if it's to her financial advantage. Maybe it's not quite comparable to such heavyweight films as "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" or "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" but if ever there was a comedy that could be considered along those lines, Breakfast at Tiffany's might be it.
Conner R

Super Reviewer

December 16, 2009
Even though it has a few politically incorrect moments, it is an amazing movie in nearly every way. Maybe it's just the fact that Audrey Hepburn is one of my favorites, but her portrayal as Holly is one of the best female performances of all time. There is essentially nothing about her that isn't completely committed or natural. The story is quite complex and the romantic element is done so well that you don't think you're watching a love story, but two people falling in love.
RCCLBC
RCCLBC

Super Reviewer

March 19, 2008
Recently re-watched this and I must begin by saying to anyone who hasn't seen it: please don't let the recent mass marketing of this film (or more specifically images from this film) discourage you from seeing it with an open mind.

It is first and foremost, very much a Capote novel. Underneath all of the crazy romantic scenarios, silly antics, bizzare characters and clever dialog, it is quite a dark and slightly disconcerting story.

Having said that, it is also very much the quintessentia Audrey Hepburn vehicle. Without her grace, beauty and charm, this would be a VERY different (much darker) film. As a matter of fact she comes across as almost TOO polished and refined to actually be the character she is portraying...but she's so delightful to watch that you will find yourself forgiving that fact and enjoy the experience.

It really is a good film, with a great cast and a sountrack that is to die for.
Mark H

Super Reviewer

June 15, 2008
A radiant Audrey Hepburn highlights this adaptation of the Truman Capote novella about a carefree woman who cannot commit to anyone or anything. She can't even bring herself to name her cat. Indeed it is a tribute to Audrey Hepburn's talent that she can make this shallow, chain smoking, shoplifting, gold digging drunk, so utterly charming. There is real vulnerability here. Nevertheless, this light, frothy flight of fancy is extremely overrated and awfully dated (Mickey Rooney's exaggerated performance is an embarrassment). However, the vividly eccentric characters and the luxurious style of it all, is captivating.
Anthony L

Super Reviewer

September 30, 2009
Classic love film. Two of my favourite scenes belong in this movie! Hepburn and Peppard turn career bests, as does Blake Edwards but Rooney's scenes are probably best forgotten.
LorenzoVonMatterhorn
LorenzoVonMatterhorn

Super Reviewer

December 5, 2008
"You could always tell what kind of a person a man thinks you are by the earrings he gives you. I must say, the mind reels."

A young New York socialite becomes interested in a young man who has moved into her apartment building.

REVIEW
"Breakfast at Tiffany's" preserves an idyllic time and place in the American psyche, New York City between WWII and The Great Society. A time when being hip and urbane were accessible (and desirable) to the middle-class.

The film's two romantic protagonists are Holly Golightly, played wonderfully by Audrey Hepburn, and Paul Varjak, played by George Peppard in an understated performance that well complements Hepburn's. Holly is an aspiring socialite and party-girl looking for a wealthy sugar daddy. Paul is an aspiring writer and kept-man of a wealthy older woman. Neither is happy, but both go through the motions in a swirl of Manhattan parties and parings.

Everything falls nicely into place in this romantic-comedy; directing, musical score, acting, and screenplay. Filmed on location in New York this is a beautiful, captivating movie, that has not only aged well, but is a time machine to a wonderful place that probably really never existed except in our imagination.
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