Buck Privates Reviews

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Mr Awesome
Super Reviewer
½ February 17, 2012
Buck Privates was the first of three movies starring Abbott and Costello and the Andrews Sisters, although Bud and Lou had one other film before. Hollywood wisely realized that Abbott and Costello couldn't carry a film on their own at this point and gave their movies regular stars and a regular plot, to which they would add their own comedy bits to. You could probably cut Abbott and Costello completely out of Buck Privates and it wouldn't affect the plot one little bit. They do their comedy bits sort of in a vaccuum apart from the rest of the film. The Andrews Sisters do a couple of songs in the movie, most noteably "You're a lucky fellow Mr. Smith" and "The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy". The Andrews Sisters, for those who don't know, were an amazingly talented singing group. Three sisters who sang airtight harmony that was quick, fluid and flawless (I remember being a little pre-schooler and begging my grandmother to play the single of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" for me every time she wanted me to take a nap- I'd lay there listening to that song over and over again on that old record player, digesting the music like it was the stuff of dreams). Anyway, besides the Abbott and Costello bits, there's also the main storyline, which involves a bit of class warfare between the rich inductee and his former butler-turned-equal-private. The rich soldier and the poor soldier butt heads over nearly everything, especially the hot girl who is apparently in the army as some sort of concubine or something. Can the soldiers overcome their differences and work together to defeat Hitler? Slow down, this isn't that kind of movie. Actually, it came out before WWII officially began, but there are undertones of the anticipation of war. As hard as they might try, nobody's fooled about the inevitable breakout of war. Still, this is pretty light-hearted fare. Entertaining, though.
February 17, 2012
Buck Privates was the first of three movies starring Abbott and Costello and the Andrews Sisters, although Bud and Lou had one other film before. Hollywood wisely realized that Abbott and Costello couldn't carry a film on their own at this point and gave their movies regular stars and a regular plot, to which they would add their own comedy bits to. You could probably cut Abbott and Costello completely out of Buck Privates and it wouldn't affect the plot one little bit. They do their comedy bits sort of in a vaccuum apart from the rest of the film. The Andrews Sisters do a couple of songs in the movie, most noteably "You're a lucky fellow Mr. Smith" and "The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy". The Andrews Sisters, for those who don't know, were an amazingly talented singing group. Three sisters who sang airtight harmony that was quick, fluid and flawless (I remember being a little pre-schooler and begging my grandmother to play the single of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" for me every time she wanted me to take a nap- I'd lay there listening to that song over and over again on that old record player, digesting the music like it was the stuff of dreams). Anyway, besides the Abbott and Costello bits, there's also the main storyline, which involves a bit of class warfare between the rich inductee and his former butler-turned-equal-private. The rich soldier and the poor soldier butt heads over nearly everything, especially the hot girl who is apparently in the army as some sort of concubine or something. Can the soldiers overcome their differences and work together to defeat Hitler? Slow down, this isn't that kind of movie. Actually, it came out before WWII officially began, but there are undertones of the anticipation of war. As hard as they might try, nobody's fooled about the inevitable breakout of war. Still, this is pretty light-hearted fare. Entertaining, though.
½ August 20, 2010
Learning to play craps, hitting on the lady soldiers, and dancing to the Andrews sisters. It's life in the Army!
November 23, 2007
All the Abbott and Costello movies had the same foruma: Have some dopey musical where a good-looking lead actor tries to win the heart of the cutie blonde in curls. These two schmucks laugh it up to make you forget the plot is pointless. They break out into silly song and dance. You don't laugh once.
½ February 6, 2007
Who's on First.. I dont know..he's on 3rd base.. the best comic routine.. plus the Andrew sisters singing .. You're a Lucky Fella Mr. Smith..
September 12, 2006
My favorite of the A & C movies. This one shines with a fun storyline, classic gags, and a great cast, including The Andrews Sisters for the musical portion of the film. They're all great, but if you see only one Abbott and Costello flick before you die, make it this one!
½ April 14, 2015
Abbott & Costello's first starring vehicle is full of lowbrow humor and a simpy love subplot, but it was a box-office smash in 1941; The Andrews Sisters sing the songs "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B" and "I'll Be With You In Apple Blossom Time," among others.
½ December 15, 2014
Really put them on the map....uneven,with lapses throughout.
½ September 14, 2013
Another great Abbot and Costello, though I didn't care for the singing, the filler, or the story, but I still enjoyed the comedy sketches.
May 6, 2013
A classic comedy with great routines and gags. Abbott and Costello are, as always the best.
Mr Awesome
Super Reviewer
½ February 17, 2012
Buck Privates was the first of three movies starring Abbott and Costello and the Andrews Sisters, although Bud and Lou had one other film before. Hollywood wisely realized that Abbott and Costello couldn't carry a film on their own at this point and gave their movies regular stars and a regular plot, to which they would add their own comedy bits to. You could probably cut Abbott and Costello completely out of Buck Privates and it wouldn't affect the plot one little bit. They do their comedy bits sort of in a vaccuum apart from the rest of the film. The Andrews Sisters do a couple of songs in the movie, most noteably "You're a lucky fellow Mr. Smith" and "The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy". The Andrews Sisters, for those who don't know, were an amazingly talented singing group. Three sisters who sang airtight harmony that was quick, fluid and flawless (I remember being a little pre-schooler and begging my grandmother to play the single of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" for me every time she wanted me to take a nap- I'd lay there listening to that song over and over again on that old record player, digesting the music like it was the stuff of dreams). Anyway, besides the Abbott and Costello bits, there's also the main storyline, which involves a bit of class warfare between the rich inductee and his former butler-turned-equal-private. The rich soldier and the poor soldier butt heads over nearly everything, especially the hot girl who is apparently in the army as some sort of concubine or something. Can the soldiers overcome their differences and work together to defeat Hitler? Slow down, this isn't that kind of movie. Actually, it came out before WWII officially began, but there are undertones of the anticipation of war. As hard as they might try, nobody's fooled about the inevitable breakout of war. Still, this is pretty light-hearted fare. Entertaining, though.
October 25, 2009
My favorite Abbott and Costello film.
½ June 28, 2006
Abbott and Costello in their second film together. They play two tie salesmen that unknowingly enlist in the army while trying to evade the police. Funny movie worth watching!
May 22, 2005
ONE OF THE BETTER ABBOTT AND COSTELLO FILMS, IT'S REASONABLY FUNNY BUT IT IS A MUST SEE FOR THE ANDREWS SISTERS SINGING "BOOGIE WOOGIE BUGLE BOY OF COMPANY C". WHAT A FANTASTIC MUSICAL NUMBER!
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