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Daisies Reviews

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366weirdmovies
366weirdmovies

Super Reviewer

June 6, 2012
Two living dolls decide the world is spoiled and so they will be too, leading to nonlinear slapstick adventures drinking, feasting and searching for a sugar daddy. Psychedelic, surreal, silly, sexy; so much absurd hedonistic fun that it was banned by the Czech censors.
Mr Awesome
Mr Awesome

Super Reviewer

March 29, 2012
Made in 1966 Czechoslovakia, director Vera Chytilová's surrealist "Daisies" was banned by the Czechoslovakian government soon after it's release. Not that it was so unusual for the soviet Czech government to ban films, but looking back now, it's hard to understand what their specific beef was. Granted, there are no overt proletarian ovations to be found here, but nor is it some sort of secret capitalist conspiracy. Inspired by the French new wave, it could most closely be considered some sort of nihilistic farce, but even that might be too specific a classification for a film so mysteriously vague.

Daisies defies categorization as such. It seems to stem directly from the id of it's director, who doesn't so much explain things as she does allow them to happen. As abstract as whatever the story might be, the filmmaking process is hyper-detailed. Scenes of apparent little consequence are crafted with such fine attention to the miniscule minutiae of background scenery. It could almost be considered obsessive-compulsive the amount of effort put into the "fine print" details. The film arbitrarily switches from black-and-white to various "strip" shades of color; images are filmed through various lenses, in effect, demonstrating great proficiency in the technological art of film craft. It would be almost impossible to deny there is an art to the madness happening on the screen.

But what of the "story"? Well, two bored girls eat a lot, then pursue various older men for the purpose of somehow toying with their hearts. They sometimes go to visit a motherly figure who lives in a woman's public restroom and sings all her dialogue to them about how lovely and young they are. Finally, they stumble upon a large, empty banquet room where a feast has been laid out and is unattended. They help themselves to the food and destroy everything in the process. "Why", you ask? I cannot say with any certainty. This is a film of the subconscious, there's no rhyme or reason, save whatever the filmmaker was feeling at the time. It's up to the individual viewer to determine what the film actually means. All I can say with certainty is, the film gives us a look into the gently mischievous moments of youth.
rubystevens
rubystevens

Super Reviewer

July 10, 2010
terrific, subversive, anarchic and bold
Coxxie M

Super Reviewer

May 6, 2009
Banned? for what? filming an Adam Sandler premise in strange colors and showing young girls drinking wine?
Jennifer X

Super Reviewer

May 2, 2011
What a weird, surreal, avant-garde, trippy, cool kind of movie! Though I definitely wouldn't watch it again, I love how aged yet neo age it is!
AJ V

Super Reviewer

September 5, 2010
I didn't get to see the entire movie, I don't think, but what I saw was overly experimental and artsy. If you like that kind of movie, then you'll like this, if not don't watch it. I didn't care for it.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

July 8, 2012
"Daisies" is an experimental film from Czechoslovakia about two young women(Ivana Karbanova & Jitka Cerhova) who mostly just hang out all the time in their apartment(one might have a job or not), in one case literally. For food, they conspire to get free meals out of middle aged men before sending them on their way at the train station. All of which is shot in black and white and color and everything in between with any number of filters, accentuated by sound and visual effects.

This is all very playful and that's pretty much it. Well, except for the opening and closing sequences which contain archival shots of aerial bombardments. To paraphrase the epigraph at the end of the movie, compared to people killing each other in a war, what these two women get up to is so minor that it is not worth complaining about. Since "Daisies" was made in 1966, maybe it has little to do with what was going on in Czechoslovakia at the time but maybe elsewhere like the escalating war in Vietnam, especially considering this was two years after the infamous 'Daisy' political ad.
Eric B

Super Reviewer

December 28, 2009
This absurdist romp is a sensuous delight, even if it doesn't add up to much. Two sexy, 20-ish girls decide the world is going bad, so they might as well go bad too. To that end, they run around pulling pranks, teasing men, playing with food, taunting each other and generally acting like bratty, self-involved children. Um, yeah. That's about it. But the thin plot is not what's important -- the lure is in the filmmaking. Whimsical editing and brilliant use of color, including an odd fascination with archaic tinting, are what really sell the film. Despite the misleading poster, Daisies really doesn't come off as "psychedelic," but it does capture the freewheeling spirit of '60s youth. Enjoy!
October 19, 2013
A peculiar little film that does things with cinema and film that I've never seen done before. Not that I've seen all movies, or anything, but I'll still consider this a unique excursion; a little coming-of-age fantasy that blows by like the puffs of a dandelion.

It works as both character sketch--albeit an extremely absurd character sketch--and as a form of social commentary.
September 22, 2012
A lovely, anarchistic Dadaist adventure of youthful rebellion in communist, pre-Spring Czechoslovakia.
August 29, 2012
At once joyful and cynical, it's an appropriately bonkers tale of youth's raging id unleashed by Western freedoms as seen through the eyes of dictatorial society, which is finally mocked by a backhanded nod of respect.
March 29, 2012
Made in 1966 Czechoslovakia, director Vera Chytilová's surrealist "Daisies" was banned by the Czechoslovakian government soon after it's release. Not that it was so unusual for the soviet Czech government to ban films, but looking back now, it's hard to understand what their specific beef was. Granted, there are no overt proletarian ovations to be found here, but nor is it some sort of secret capitalist conspiracy. Inspired by the French new wave, it could most closely be considered some sort of nihilistic farce, but even that might be too specific a classification for a film so mysteriously vague.

Daisies defies categorization as such. It seems to stem directly from the id of it's director, who doesn't so much explain things as she does allow them to happen. As abstract as whatever the story might be, the filmmaking process is hyper-detailed. Scenes of apparent little consequence are crafted with such fine attention to the miniscule minutiae of background scenery. It could almost be considered obsessive-compulsive the amount of effort put into the "fine print" details. The film arbitrarily switches from black-and-white to various "strip" shades of color; images are filmed through various lenses, in effect, demonstrating great proficiency in the technological art of film craft. It would be almost impossible to deny there is an art to the madness happening on the screen.

But what of the "story"? Well, two bored girls eat a lot, then pursue various older men for the purpose of somehow toying with their hearts. They sometimes go to visit a motherly figure who lives in a woman's public restroom and sings all her dialogue to them about how lovely and young they are. Finally, they stumble upon a large, empty banquet room where a feast has been laid out and is unattended. They help themselves to the food and destroy everything in the process. "Why", you ask? I cannot say with any certainty. This is a film of the subconscious, there's no rhyme or reason, save whatever the filmmaker was feeling at the time. It's up to the individual viewer to determine what the film actually means. All I can say with certainty is, the film gives us a look into the gently mischievous moments of youth.
February 11, 2012
It's OK, I guess. Not sure what the feminist aspect is here, they're just behaving like the Real Housewives of some vaguely European nation, except their single never dropped.
March 13, 2010
In Daisies (Sedmikrásky; dir. V?ra Chytilová, 1966), corruption is immediately recognized as the general state of the world. After showing real-world images of violence and destruction, the two Marias (Ivana Karbanová, blonde, and Jitka Cerhová, brunette) discuss how they should react to what these images of violence represent: the decline of society.
Blonde Maria notes how easy it is for her to appear ?like a virgin? and suggests that appearing like one is good enough to actually, for all intents and purposes, be one. This uncovers one of the problems that led to the so-called ?terrible state of the world? as expressed in the film?that everyone can disguise any part of themselves that they want, and they will only be that disguised form to others. That is to say, people are too free to ?be what they want,? even if it means hiding something ?bad? about themselves. We have no way of knowing how bad people (or governments!) truly are.
As a kind of service to the world, though, the Marias decide together to not hide their badness, and to instead be as outwardly rude as they want. Some of the things they do are relatively harmless pranks: leading on married men and annoying them away or ditching them on a train, drinking too much at a club, and taking the attention away from the performers there. Soon, though, their actions are more agreeably evil: starting with stealing money from a person they know and are friendly with.
In the longest (and near-final) scene of the film, the Marias raze a banquet hall and all the food inside of it. The attention to each step of the destruction?from just picking at the food to entirely destroying it by stepping on it and breaking the plates?is relatable to the many steps it surely took for the ?state of the world? to get as bad as it has according to the film. The world did not fall apart all at once?it took a series of worse and worse actions to grow to its current condition.
Once the entire banquet hall is ruined, the Marias realize the error of their ways and superficially try to fix the hall back to its previous condition, but it is too late. Despite their efforts to fix the problems they caused, they did not succeed in doing so, which resulted in their ultimate demise. The chandelier would not have been loose had they not swung on it earlier in a moment of chaos, and would not have fallen on them. The movie finishes with more videos of violence (like in the beginning of the film), showing that there was corruption before the events of Daisies and there continues to be the same problems after. Even the perpetrators of the evils?the Marias in the film, or the entirety of society in the real world?cannot fix them in such a way that it will restore the world to a problem-less state.
It is through corruption that the Marias find the most joy in living, and when they begin to try to change their ways, they do not succeed and finally probably die. So, does the film mean to say that we are hopeless against fighting evil and we should just do what we want? The dedication written in the end of the film, "THIS FILM IS DEDICATED TO THOSE WHO BECOME AGGRAVTED ONLY OVER TRAMPLED SALAD," is mocking people who are offended over trivial things such as one of the ?evil? acts that the Marias perform?walking on food. If people who are ?aggravated? over trivial things are mocked, then perhaps we should all take the ?evils of the world? a little less seriously and live and let live.
jes25924
June 27, 2008
One of the most vibrant and fun art house films you are ever likely to see. Vera Chytilova was merging feminism, nihilism, psychedlic color filters, collage aesthetic, and silent film slapstick into a one of a kind film about two young girls named Ma...(read more)rie who decide to self destruct, and be just as wicked as the world. They con men into buying them lunch and ditch them at train stations, get drunk in posh nightclubs, set their beds on fire, and lay siege to whole banquets(this latter bit got the film and the director into alot of trouble with the Soviet Czech government for "wasting food"). Anyway this is an energetic and vibrant film as youre likely to find anywhere, and unlike so many great euro art films, this is as fun to watch as it is think about afterwards. Ive shown this movie to alot of people and Ive never had a complaint, it clocks in at just over an hour, so if youve got the time, go for it. It's a one of kind experience(in fact the worst part of this movie is the cover).
Michael H.
December 15, 2011
Two pouty-lipped girls decide to act spoiled. They succeed.

Sometimes visually creative and interesting but never compelling. Also rather food-obsessed.
July 13, 2011
This film is like the weird kid on the block, at first you may find him interesting, but then the more he talks or acts, the more you grow exhausted, until you decide to lose his trail. After a while, though, you'll start thinking about him again and the more you do, the more you find the things he said or done to make some sense. Weird kid or weird record you listened back when you were a kid, take your pick (mine was Bjork's Debut).
Dave J
March 31, 2014
Monday, March 31, 2014

(1967) Daisies
(In Czechoslovakia with English subtitles)
SOCIAL COMMENTARY/ SURREALISM

Plot less movie with a message, I initially was incapable to understand had it not been for the information by TCM, co-written and directed by Vera Chytilová, using two young teenage girls named Marie(Ivana Karbanová and Jitka Cerhová) going through life, without a single care in the world as it's focal point. As they're babbling about some things I'm incapable to understand, which viewers have to be familiar with in regarding historical leaders that affected Czech Republic. As the two girls are used as 'metaphors' in regarding the slow destruction of the world, since much of the world leaders are 'spoiled', mimicking their behavior.

Footnote: The food wasting scenes was what got this movie banned in Czechoslovakia in the first place, which somehow symbolizes(a very personal painful scene to watch) how we as people can treat food in real life as we speak.

2.5 out of 4 stars
August 9, 2011
Super babe jerk ladies!
October 22, 2013
Brilliant. Wild. Crazy. Decadent. Divine. DAISIES is so full of ideas it is ready to explode. Can't believe TCM is showing this masterpiece of New Czech Cinema. Decadent and anti-bourgeois, DAISIES perfectly captures the spirit and promise of mid-communism before the Russian tanks came rolling in. Extraordinary, profound and influential. Are there any more superlatives I can lay on DAISIES?
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