Ohayo (Good Morning) Reviews

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Luke B
Super Reviewer
July 21, 2008
Ozu said he wanted to make a film about people's inability to express the important things, but natter on about unimportant gossip. This all comes out thanks to two boys that really want a TV. They enter into a vow of silence until their TV comes. This silence is misconstrued by the neighbours, who think their mother is angry at them. They begin to gossip amongst themslves and rumors soon start. Meanwhile, the young boys' aunt and teacher are attracted, but fail to act on their emotions. This is a lovely little film, filled with some great humor. Though, I must admit, there was a bit too much focus on the poo/farts jokes. The two boys, especially the youngest, are very cute and make their efforts to get a TV seem less brattish. It's really sweet to see how dedicated the parents are, and even though the kids are kind of mean, they do appreciate the gift in the end. There's no escaping Ozu's look at the clashes between old and new, with the TV looming over all procedures as something that will change life. A little gem, if not one of Ozu's classics.
sanjurosamurai sanjurosamurai
Super Reviewer
May 11, 2009
what a hilarious film. unlike any film ozu ever made. although this film does focus on his usual themes of family, multiple generations and the evil that is associated with gossip, the film is different in that it is an all out comedy, and one of the funniest films i have ever seen. the comedy brought in by the gossiping neighbors is classic, but the two main kids really steal the film. the film effectively blends potty humor with intelligent and witty dialogue, and even as an american the japanese humor was effective enough to not be lost due to cultural confusions. great comedy.
Harlequin68 Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ October 19, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]Directed by Yasujiro Ozu, "Good Morning" is a charming movie set around a single extended household and is in general concerned with the need for politeness for any society to properly work which is an argument that certainly has its merits. On the other hand, I do agree with Ani Difranco that nice is overrated and Douglas Adams on the sheer annoyance of always stating the obvious, especially if it involves the bus being late.(I caught myself doing this yesterday to kickstart a conversation and instantly hated myself for it.) And I would also like to point out that there is little difference that politeness alone can make in an economic downturn as depicted in this film. Setsuko(Yoshiko Kuga) lives with her sister, Tamiko(Kuniko Miyake), and their father(Chishu Ryu) who is worried about his impending retirement. Setsuko works but is also interested in Heichiro(Keiji Sada), who was laid off and now takes odd jobs(at least one of them is not door-to-door salesman) which include translations and the tutoring of her nephews, Minoru(Koji Shitara) and Isamu(Masahiko Shimazu), who occasionally do not show up in order to instead watch sumo wrestling on a neighbor's television set due to them not having one in their own home. That and a continuing barrage of leftovers is not making them happy.[/font]
Mark L ½ May 22, 2011
This is my third Ozu film I have seen, and I can say I have never been more surprised to see fart jokes in a movie (I mean, it is Ozu!). Good movie, but not his best.
Hossein N ½ August 24, 2010
Aug 2010 - This is Ozu at what he does better than anyone. The modernizing urban japan and how exactly the families look. The children are amazing and make the movie so lively, so do the wives of the neighbors. (By the way why Ozu families almost never have little girls?) The humor is so natural and light. My favorite scene is when we see a very long corridor with a tv box in the middle and at the end there is the kids room, where they are celebrating the purchase of the new tv set.
Lene . July 21, 2008
Beautiful colors! I wasn't happy with the outcome of the movie. I love the sound the kids made when they farted!
Steve C March 9, 2014
I enjoyed this film much more than I thought. The story seems very simple, kids want a TV. But it is much more than that, it is about modern technology entering Japan and individual's reactions. Also a difference between traditional Japan and the Westernization of Japan. A really good film, it is actually a remake of Ozu's I was Burn, But... from 1932.
Jace L January 25, 2013
A lighthearted comedy that shouldn't be ignored.
Jake F August 3, 2012
Surprisingly sweet as well as potent, this film about two boys who go silent until their parents by them a TV in the late 50s Japan sports wonderful performances by all around (especially the mother), and a spot on showcase of our abuse and misuse of communication as well as societies fear and judgement of each other. Very well made, paced just right, and able to have great message with a G rating.
Joseph S April 17, 2012
It's Ozu in Technicolor. What's not to love?
Risya Risya ½ January 27, 2012
An enjoyable lighthearted little film. Loved the settings of this film, with its lively small suburb, its style portrayal of Japan late-1950's family life and the charming little childrens. I also loved the camera placement where the camera never moves but each shot is perfectly framed that highlights what the director wants the viewers to see. The "retro" color of the film are nice too.
Allen R April 1, 2011
Who says arthouse films can't contain a never-ending stream of fart jokes? I'll put even this minor Ozu up against the best efforts from today's "auteurs"
ToDandy ToDandy ½ October 28, 2010
An upbeat, charming dramady that brings forward the early effects of americanization in Japan.
gillianren gillianren December 17, 2008
This film could just as easily been made in the US at the same time. Oh, the kids wouldn't be taking English lessons and watching sumo, but there are other lessons they could be taking, and they could be watching, I don't know, [i]Howdy Doody[/i] instead. Or baseball. There would still be the sniping, the petty gossip, the unspoken love. Boys are boys everywhere. And if your neighbours speak to one another, there will be gossip. I could tell you stories from my neighbourhood back home--and that's the point, isn't it? I can still tell you that one of my neighbours in a house I lived in for about a year, when I was in Port Angeles, had a metal plate in his head, and that neighbourhood gossip was that it explained a lot.

This movie is set in a small suburb of possibly Tokyo. It may have said, but I'm not sure. Further, I can't remember the names of any of the characters, so bear with me on that, too. We seem to be looking at three households. There's the one with the two boys, the one with the TV, and the one with the washing machine. The mother of the household with the two boys and, I guess, the maid have supposedly paid dues to the woman with the washing machine, I never figured out why, but those dues don't show up as being paid. Gossip has it that the dues went toward the purchase of that washing machine. A young man--a younger brother?--lives in the house with the two boys, and he pines after a young woman--a younger sister?--living in the house with the washing machine. Or possibly vice versa. I missed a lot. And, finally, the two boys enter a vow of silence until their family buys a TV.

When the boys enter their vow of silence, it's not something that they tell anyone about, of course. So the other grownups think it's about something their mother said about the other grownups, and the whole family is carrying a grudge. The gossip picks up again, having died off when the woman who owns the washing machine found out that her mother, who lives with the family, had forgotten to hand over the money. One rather gets the impression that gossip in this neighbourhood never truly dies away; it just finds new things to focus on.

The subtitles weren't very good. I think I missed some dialogue, and it was hard at times to figure out who was saying what. And, again, I literally did not catch any character's name. I [i]think[/i] the young woman's name was Setsuko; if she was, she was played by Yoshiko Kuga. However, I can't tell you which of the three boys was called what, and I don't remember any family's last name. I mostly managed to keep track of the petty rivalries and so forth, but I never did figure out why the boys were eating such weird food. And, indeed, my brain only seems to process that there were three of them, but there were four. The two brothers, the boy with the TV, and the boy whose mother owned the washing machine--who, I think, had diarrhea from the pumice powder he was eating for whatever reason it was that he ate pumice powder. He was having some kind of problem, anyway. I didn't really know what was going on most of the time.

It wasn't a bad movie, and I'm only half-sure I would have known more of what was going on had I seen it in English. However, in English or in Japanese, it's about the kind of problem that really only seems important to those whose problem it is. I think the movie might have been improved had it concentrated more on either the parents or the children, but I could be wrong there, too. I feel something could have improved the movie, but I'm not 100% sure what.
Harlequin68 Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ October 19, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]Directed by Yasujiro Ozu, "Good Morning" is a charming movie set around a single extended household and is in general concerned with the need for politeness for any society to properly work which is an argument that certainly has its merits. On the other hand, I do agree with Ani Difranco that nice is overrated and Douglas Adams on the sheer annoyance of always stating the obvious, especially if it involves the bus being late.(I caught myself doing this yesterday to kickstart a conversation and instantly hated myself for it.) And I would also like to point out that there is little difference that politeness alone can make in an economic downturn as depicted in this film. Setsuko(Yoshiko Kuga) lives with her sister, Tamiko(Kuniko Miyake), and their father(Chishu Ryu) who is worried about his impending retirement. Setsuko works but is also interested in Heichiro(Keiji Sada), who was laid off and now takes odd jobs(at least one of them is not door-to-door salesman) which include translations and the tutoring of her nephews, Minoru(Koji Shitara) and Isamu(Masahiko Shimazu), who occasionally do not show up in order to instead watch sumo wrestling on a neighbor's television set due to them not having one in their own home. That and a continuing barrage of leftovers is not making them happy.[/font]
zach.seely zach.seely July 16, 2007
Saturated with beautiful colors, the film is very funny, entertaining and charming.

Not to mention that this film has many things to say about adult life hidden under the flatulence, sitcom style portrayal of familial life, and charming children.

Truely enjoyable!
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