Opening

61% The Maze Runner Sep 19
63% A Walk Among the Tombstones Sep 19
40% This Is Where I Leave You Sep 19
83% Tracks Sep 19
93% The Guest Sep 17

Top Box Office

11% No Good Deed $24.3M
72% Dolphin Tale 2 $15.9M
92% Guardians of the Galaxy $8.1M
19% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $4.9M
20% Let's Be Cops $4.4M
89% The Drop $4.1M
37% If I Stay $3.9M
36% The November Man $2.8M
34% The Giver $2.6M
67% The Hundred-Foot Journey $2.4M

Coming Soon

68% The Equalizer Sep 26
70% The Boxtrolls Sep 26
86% The Two Faces of January Sep 26
—— Two Night Stand Sep 26
91% Jimi: All Is by My Side Sep 26

New Episodes Tonight

100% Garfunkel and Oates: Season 1
—— Haven: Season 5
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
56% Married: Season 1
39% Rush: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
83% Extant: Season 1
—— Franklin & Bash: Season 4
—— The League: Season 6
56% Legends: Season 1
22% The Mysteries of Laura: Season 1
56% Red Band Society: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

87% Boardwalk Empire: Season 5
86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
91% Doctor Who: Season 8
83% Extant: Season 1
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
87% The Knick: Season 1
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
90% Outlander: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

Gregory's Two Girls Reviews

Page 1 of 1
Cassandra M

Super Reviewer

February 10, 2011
The good thing about this film is that it stands alone - you don't have to have seen the original. Unfortunately this is also it's biggest drawback. It would have been nice to have included a few of the original characters in the new story and seen how their lives had developed. Sinclair as in the original is excellent and provides the films best comic moments as he attempts to deal with awkward and embarrassing situations but the supporting cast is not as strong as in the original movie. Forsyth is to be congratulated on a brave attempt to move the character on and create an original sequel but the film is ultimately flawed and lacks the warmth of the original
Eric B

Super Reviewer

March 12, 2010
"Gregory's Girl" (1981) was a beloved independent hit, but this disappointing sequel was barely noticed. Years have passed, and gawky Gregory (John Gordon Sinclair) is now schoolteacher Greg. His head is filled with grand ideas of righteous politics, to such degrees that his class is casually told to remind him when his lectures fly too far off-topic. But he's also troubled by taboo feelings for his pretty student Frances (Carly McKinnon, who has just one other acting credit). Further complications arise with the blunt sexual overtures of eligible Bel (Maria Doyle Kennedy, warmly appealing) and a reunion with an old chum (Dougray Scott) who's now a communications mogul. When the latter's shady operations inflame Frances' young idealism, Greg must choose between his conflicting loyalties.

Scottish writer/director Bill Forsyth once seemed like a major talent but his career went permanently astray after the flop of 1994's "Being Human," his Robin Williams-led bid for commercial pay dirt. It's a shame, because his earlier films are quite wonderful. This weak attempt at revisiting a past success is weighed down with a dodgy student/teacher bond that is treated as something sweet rather than distasteful and a high-tech subplot that is grossly inappropriate for the setting's gentle, small-town ambience. The thick accents are a sizable problem for international audiences and, really, Mr. Forsyth..."beaver" jokes?
Eric B

Super Reviewer

March 12, 2010
"Gregory's Girl" (1981) was a beloved independent hit, but this disappointing sequel was barely noticed. Years have passed, and gawky Gregory (John Gordon Sinclair) is now schoolteacher Greg. His head is filled with grand ideas of righteous politics, to such degrees that his class is casually told to remind him when his lectures fly too far off-topic. But he's also troubled by taboo feelings for his pretty student Frances (Carly McKinnon, who has just one other acting credit). Further complications arise with the blunt sexual overtures of eligible Bel (Maria Doyle Kennedy, warmly appealing) and a reunion with an old chum (Dougray Scott) who's now a communications mogul. When the latter's shady operations inflame Frances' young idealism, Greg must choose between his conflicting loyalties.

Scottish writer/director Bill Forsyth once seemed like a major talent but his career went permanently astray after the flop of 1994's "Being Human," his Robin Williams-led bid for commercial pay dirt. It's a shame, because his earlier films are quite wonderful. This weak attempt at revisiting a past success is weighed down with a dodgy student/teacher bond that is treated as something sweet rather than distasteful and a high-tech subplot that is grossly inappropriate for the setting's gentle, small-town ambience. The thick accents are a sizable problem for international audiences and, really, Mr. Forsyth..."beaver" jokes?
Page 1 of 1
Find us on:                     
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile