Hitch-Hike Reviews

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Super Reviewer
October 9, 2014
If the casual observer mistook the luridly exploitative 'Hitch-Hike' for a spaghetti western, they wouldn't be too far afield due to Ennio Morricone's florid score that wouldn't be officious in a Sergio Leone film. Swigging off a bottle of booze and molesting his wife, Eve (Corinne Clery), after he remarks that she was in the sight of his sniper rifle minutes before, Franco Nero is downright deplorable as the loutish Walter Mancini and as the film continues on, he is not easily empathized with. In fact, he is such a philistine that he can hardly be categorized as the protagonist. Despite the fact that the audience is tipped off to David Hess' homicidal spree early when he turns off his car radio with a carcass in the passenger seat, he is so cordial and Franco is so brusque that we gravitate toward Hess. While the dubbing is occasionally desynchronized, the psychosexual subtext between the trio is riveting. Director Pasquale Festa Campanile doesn't skimp on the visceral killshots, the roadside murders of two police officers is truly sensationalized (An exit wound through a helmet is awfully gristly) At one point, a perverse symbiosis develops between Franco and Hess and a salacious 'Indecent Proposal' scenario arises for the "sex" quotient of Hess' autobiography. Priding itself with transparent Hitchcockian twists halfway through the runtime, 'Hitch-Hike' is a sadistic, sprawling rollercoaster with a somewhat sour aftertaste.
Super Reviewer
October 9, 2014
If the casual observer mistook the luridly exploitative 'Hitch-Hike' for a spaghetti western, they wouldn't be too far afield due to Ennio Morricone's florid score that wouldn't be officious in a Sergio Leone film. Swigging off a bottle of booze and molesting his wife, Eve (Corinne Clery), after he remarks that she was in the sight of his sniper rifle minutes before, Franco Nero is downright deplorable as the loutish Walter Mancini and as the film continues on, he is not easily empathized with. In fact, he is such a philistine that he can hardly be categorized as the protagonist. Despite the fact that the audience is tipped off to David Hess' homicidal spree early when he turns off his car radio with a carcass in the passenger seat, he is so cordial and Franco is so brusque that we gravitate toward Hess. While the dubbing is occasionally desynchronized, the psychosexual subtext between the trio is riveting. Director Pasquale Festa Campanile doesn't skimp on the visceral killshots, the roadside murders of two police officers is truly sensationalized (An exit wound through a helmet is awfully gristly) At one point, a perverse symbiosis develops between Franco and Hess and a salacious 'Indecent Proposal' scenario arises for the "sex" quotient of Hess' autobiography. Priding itself with transparent Hitchcockian twists halfway through the runtime, 'Hitch-Hike' is a sadistic, sprawling rollercoaster with a somewhat sour aftertaste.
Page 1 of 1