Intervista Reviews

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arashxak
Super Reviewer
October 11, 2008
My first Fellini was really disappointing, Maybe it wasn't a good choice to watch this before his other movies
Super Reviewer
½ January 9, 2010
It's a shame "Intervista" wasn't Federico Fellini's last film, because it would have been a perfect farewell. Mostly autobiographical, it features the director himself as a prominent onscreen player.

Fellini described the film as an informal chat among friends, and "Intervista" indeed has an enjoyably meandering, conversational structure. Not just a movie-within-a-movie, it even becomes a movie-within-a-movie-within-a-movie.

A chirpy Japanese crew maneuvers to interview Fellini as he shoots a retelling of Franz Kafka's "Amerika." He soon introduces actor Sergio Rubini, who will be portraying Fellini as a young man. Fellini advises a makeup girl to add a pimple to Rubini's nose for comic effect, but a short time later, the pimple is "real" and Rubini is dramatizing Fellini's memories of visiting a major Italian film studio for the first time. Innocent, awestruck Fellini sees various scenes being shot and eventually has trivial dressing-room dialogue with an aging movie queen. Once that section closes, the narrative moves to backstage sequences including a depiction of how Fellini casts his legendary "faces," a surreal attack by Indians wielding TV antennas instead of spears and, most touchingly, a reunion between Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg. Twenty-seven years have passed since the two splashed in a fountain during a famous "La Dolce Vita" scene, and Ekberg is much heavier and no longer a hot property. Of course, Mastroianni has become a superstar, but Ekberg shows no competitive bitterness. Their misty-eyed viewing of the old footage -- their tears require no acting, I'm sure -- is usually cited as "Intervista"'s highlight.
January 15, 2013
A meta look at Fellini's career is a delightful trip through the Italian studios and breaks down the fourth wall a lot. Not as strong as a lot of his movies but is good for a director very late in his career.
May 21, 2012
Pure fascination! All Fellini's lovely fixations get together. It's more like a documentary rather than a film.
Bunch of likable misfits hanging out for no apparent reason, but Fellini's presence addresses them to happiness and nostalgia.
Super Reviewer
½ January 9, 2010
It's a shame "Intervista" wasn't Federico Fellini's last film, because it would have been a perfect farewell. Mostly autobiographical, it features the director himself as a prominent onscreen player.

Fellini described the film as an informal chat among friends, and "Intervista" indeed has an enjoyably meandering, conversational structure. Not just a movie-within-a-movie, it even becomes a movie-within-a-movie-within-a-movie.

A chirpy Japanese crew maneuvers to interview Fellini as he shoots a retelling of Franz Kafka's "Amerika." He soon introduces actor Sergio Rubini, who will be portraying Fellini as a young man. Fellini advises a makeup girl to add a pimple to Rubini's nose for comic effect, but a short time later, the pimple is "real" and Rubini is dramatizing Fellini's memories of visiting a major Italian film studio for the first time. Innocent, awestruck Fellini sees various scenes being shot and eventually has trivial dressing-room dialogue with an aging movie queen. Once that section closes, the narrative moves to backstage sequences including a depiction of how Fellini casts his legendary "faces," a surreal attack by Indians wielding TV antennas instead of spears and, most touchingly, a reunion between Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg. Twenty-seven years have passed since the two splashed in a fountain during a famous "La Dolce Vita" scene, and Ekberg is much heavier and no longer a hot property. Of course, Mastroianni has become a superstar, but Ekberg shows no competitive bitterness. Their misty-eyed viewing of the old footage -- their tears require no acting, I'm sure -- is usually cited as "Intervista"'s highlight.
April 5, 2011
(** 1/2): Thumbs Down

I liked some moments but this is not as good as many of Fellini's other works.
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