Invisible Agent - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Invisible Agent Reviews

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TheDudeLebowski65
Super Reviewer
½ October 19, 2011
Fourth entry in The Invisible Man series is a semi decent horror adventure with bits of comedy thrown in. The film had a great idea, but I felt it lacked the real fire that the plot suggested. I mean, really the plot was interesting, creative and interesting. However the film ends up feeling somewhat silly, and the finished film lacks somewhat to really make it good. The film is a decent entry in the series, but it never becomes anything better than it is. The ideas were fantastic for this film, however the execution feels a tad poor and it wasn't really a fulfilling experience. Considering the plot direction, the film could have been a lot less silly and considering how the film starts out, it's surprising that the film has more gags going on on-screen. I liked the film, but as much as I'd wanted to. It's too bad because the story had the potential to be excellent, but really it leaves a lot to be desired. The film had plenty of things that could have been improved upon such as the attempt at humor. The film is and entertaining, but it lacks as well. The film had the potential in being something very good, but it's only somewhat decent. The film is decent, and entertaining, but in the end it leaves unsatisfied with the finished film. Considering such a unique plot, this could have been one of the best of the series. Though not perfect, this is still entertaining, but you'll notice that it could have been done much better.
Super Reviewer
½ December 24, 2008
Again Curt Siodmak wrote this. Siodmak wrote a lot of the Universal monster movie sequels and wrote the original Wolf Man. All of these sequels to The Invisible Man cannot rightly be judged as comparable horror movies though. This one is an espionage tale with some war time propaganda and a romance in the mix.

Jon Hall plays Frank Raymond (AKA Jack Griffin), the grandson of the original invisible man. He doesn't know how to produce the invisibility chemical himself he claims, but he inherited enough to use in the future. Again in this story, he knows the extreme danger in using the chemical and so he has no intention of ever using it. Especially when agents from the Axis powers come and try to strong arm him into working for them. Cedric Hardwicke makes his second appearance in an invisible man movie as another villain. This time he is a Nazi officer named Stauffer. This was released the same year as Casablanca and Peter Lorre (just because he's exotic) plays the Japanese Baron Ikito. Griffin, or excuse me, Raymond doesn't even want the Allied powers using the invisibility formula. That is until, duh duh DUH, Pearl Harbor is attacked. Raymond marches right to a meeting of the Allied powers and volunteers to be an invisible agent who will go to Germany to gather some intelligence. Once he parachutes in, he meets an old carpenter who is his contact in Germany. He meets Ilona Massey as Maria Sorenson who is a double agent and right away they charm each other and fall in love. Bromberg as another Nazi officer named Heiser is trying to smooth talk Maria as she tries to loosen his tongue. The invisible agent makes a fool out of Heiser before he reveals the details of Hitler's plan to attack America. So the plot is extended because he's made it more difficult for himself to find the information and Stauffer and Ikito are now suspicious of Maria and suspect an invisible man might be about. The movie portrays that the Germans and the Japanese don't really trust each other, so it gives Americans the comfortable feeling that they are bound to destroy each other. Heiser stays in the action and Maria is suspected to be a triple or quadruple agent. But the big thing is that the invisible man never encounters the threat of going mad this time. In fact, he's a bit of an insomniac. He's such a good all-American boy who is serving his country during it's hour of need that the megalomaniac tendencies of the drug just fade away.

Again, visually, the effects that suggest the invisible man is in a room come off as slapstick. Wires are visible on some of the props again and there aren't really that many new effects introduced. Instead of bandages wrapped all around his head, this invisible man smears cold cream on his hands and face and wraps a towel around his head like a woman having a spa treatment. This preserves his handsome facial features and removes him further from the scary monster imagery. The movie is enjoyable at times and the propaganda is really not that bad.
Super Reviewer
½ November 5, 2014
Tailoring the series for the war effort, the occasionally entertaining The Invisible Agent does little for morale, but winningly keeps the SFX at the forefront. Aping Charlie Chaplin (The Great Dictator) and The Three Stooges (You Nazty Spy!, Ill Never Heil Again) in making the Third Reich out to be a buffoonish laughingstock, this harmless film keeps the tone light even when its trying to be serious.

In this unrated continuation of the Universal series, the Invisible Man's grandson (Jon Hall) uses his secret formula to spy on Nazi Germany.

Here, Peter Lorre gets better material than with The Invisible Woman. Hes joined by Ilona Massey and Cedric Hardwicke in a tale that's more rousing and enjoyable than it deserves to be. Hats off to Kurt Siodmak, a screenwriter who churned out a ridiculous amount of scripts for every Universal horror franchise but The Mummy including Dracula (Son of Dracula), Frankenstein (House of Frankenstein), The Invisible Man (The Invisible Man Returns), and, The Wolf Man (Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man). This espionage thriller-cum-comedy might not approach the quality of his crowning achievement (The Wolf Man) but its funtastic enough to earn him huge respect just for his overall batting average when it comes to quality and output.

Bottom line: Spy Gamey
½ April 27, 2015
While it breaks away from the roots of the original film, it's pretty interesting on its own. The characters are decent enough, and there's plenty of fun invisible gags. It's not so much of a horror movie, but for a spy flick it's great.
March 9, 2015
Pedestrian spy drama (more of a comedy at times) using the invisible man's grandson in a secret mission in Germany in WWII.
Super Reviewer
½ November 5, 2014
Tailoring the series for the war effort, the occasionally entertaining The Invisible Agent does little for morale, but winningly keeps the SFX at the forefront. Aping Charlie Chaplin (The Great Dictator) and The Three Stooges (You Nazty Spy!, Ill Never Heil Again) in making the Third Reich out to be a buffoonish laughingstock, this harmless film keeps the tone light even when its trying to be serious.

In this unrated continuation of the Universal series, the Invisible Man's grandson (Jon Hall) uses his secret formula to spy on Nazi Germany.

Here, Peter Lorre gets better material than with The Invisible Woman. Hes joined by Ilona Massey and Cedric Hardwicke in a tale that's more rousing and enjoyable than it deserves to be. Hats off to Kurt Siodmak, a screenwriter who churned out a ridiculous amount of scripts for every Universal horror franchise but The Mummy including Dracula (Son of Dracula), Frankenstein (House of Frankenstein), The Invisible Man (The Invisible Man Returns), and, The Wolf Man (Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man). This espionage thriller-cum-comedy might not approach the quality of his crowning achievement (The Wolf Man) but its funtastic enough to earn him huge respect just for his overall batting average when it comes to quality and output.

Bottom line: Spy Gamey
½ May 17, 2010
A step further away from the source material, but at least we're back to the Griffen family, this time the grandson of the original invisible man. That in itself is a curious development since the invisible man died at the end of the first film wthout any indication that he had any children. To avoid confusion I just assume that history has become muddled in the following decades and that our hero is actually the grandson of the invisible man's brother from the first sequel. This time there seems to be little concern for the madness caused by the drug, though at least it's mentioned in passing. Also there's no worry about becoming visible again, presumably because the solution was discovered at the end of The Invisible Man Returns. Many of the rules of invisibility established in preceding films are discarded in this one. This time food and drinks swallowed by the invisible man become invisible too, unlike the first film. In the second film we saw how the invisible man could be seen in therain or a smoky room. Not so here.

The story is relatively simple. Axis spies try to get the invisibility formula, and fail. Subsequently, the invisible man offers his services to the United States. He is sent into Germany to discover a plot by the nazis, and by coincidence comes up against the same spies who tried to steal his formula. His invisible state gives him such an edge that his assignment would be simple, but he chooses to abuse his power to amuse himself. Madness or just immaturity, it's for you to decide. Regardless, his hijinks make a simple job difficult, allowing enough time for a feature length picture.

A must for Peter Lorre fans, and Sir Cedric Hardwicke and Ilona Massey are here too. Word has it that the star, Jon Hall, was a big action star of the day, so anyone who has heard of him and enjoys his work might want to give this one a look too, though you won't see much of him.

A piece of pro-America, wartime propaganda, The Invisible Agent has everything you'd expect: a plucky American hero who speaks about freedom whenever he isn't wowing the girl and fooling the enemy, noble allied commanders, evil and bumbling Nazis, and cold, calculating Japanese.

Unlike the third film in the "invisible series," The Invisible Woman, this film is tied to the original, with the grandson of the scientist in the first film acting as keeper of the drug. The serum is supposedly the same, but it no longer causes insanity (you can't have your red, white, and blue champion going nuts when saving the world). Nor does he feel the need to hide for a time after eating to hide undigested, so visible, food.

With an uneasy mix of comedy and espionage, Frank heads to Germany where he should be nearly invulnerable, but instead gives away his location at every opportunity by playing silly pranks. I'm sure his dropping a Nazi's dinner in his lap is supposed to be hilarious, but instead it just makes Frank out to be feebleminded. He puts the girl in danger and risks his mission for a few stunts.

The bumbling Nazi jokes aren't funny, but aren't embarrassing. Bromberg does the silly villain bit well, (he played Don Luis Quintero in The Mark of Zorro) but he feels no more like a German than the very British Hardwicke. Stranger is the casting of Peter Lorre as Baron Ikito. Wearing only small round glasses to imply his Japanese nature, I must assume he comes from the Eastern European part of Japan. As for his character, when did the Japanese have barons as part of their feudal system? I was waiting for the next logical step, when Sultan Hitler would show up.

Although the comedy falls flat, once the film finally becomes a war thriller, it delivers. There's a bit of real tension and some pulp influenced action.

And you have to enjoy any film that has Peter Lorre saying "Occidental decay is nowhere more apparent than in that childish sentimentality of white men for their women." Yup.

However, Invisible Agent is a great addition to the series and genre of horror, despite is not having a real horror storyline. Recommended for every fan of the series. It's unfaithful to the source material, yet it is still able to retrieve itself from the ashes of the file cabinet titled: Flaws.
March 9, 2010
Not bad, but it's not at all related to the rest of the series. Still, neither was The Invisible Woman, and that wasn't bad either. Campy fun for the right audience.
September 27, 2009
Being unfaithful to its source material, yet still being able to retrieve itself from the pit most horror sequels fall in - Invisible Agent is a horror movie without the horror. It can be a comedy movie, but Invisible Agent doesn't accept the romantic comedy fracture that is sometimes goes into. The agent falls in love with another woman, of course his is invisible, which freaks her out at first. Invisible Agent poses no threat to the horror genre though, because the film swerves into another lane near the end of the film. It becomes a mix between Schindler's List, No Country for Old Men, and Hollow Man. Schindler's List due to the fact it takes place during WWII. No Country for Old Men has to do with the agent's continuous and dangerous journey. And of course, Hollow Man style since he is invisible. But that's not why I chose Hollow Man as the film's tone. The film's character, the agent, doesn't go on a killing spree, but he does have to murder some people to make things run smoothly. So it can be considered a horror film, if you imply drama, comedy, and action into the same little word of horror.
½ June 5, 2005
A step further away from the source material, but at least we're back to the Griffen family, this time the grandson of the original invisible man. That in itself is a curious development since the invisible man died at the end of the first film wthout any indication that he had any children. To avoid confusion I just assume that history has become muddled in the following decades and that our hero is actually the grandson of the invisible man's brother from the first sequel. This time there seems to be little concern for the madness caused by the drug, though at least it's mentioned in passing. Also there's no worry about becoming visible again, presumably because the solution was discovered at the end of The Invisible Man Returns. Many of the rules of invisibility established in preceding films are discarded in this one. This time food and drinks swallowed by the invisible man become invisible too, unlike the first film. In the second film we saw how the invisible man could be seen in therain or a smoky room. Not so here.
The story is relatively simple. Axis spies try to get the invisibility formula, and fail. Subsequently, the invisible man offers his services to the United States. He is sent into Germany to discover a plot by the nazis, and by coincidence comes up against the same spies who tried to steal his formula. His invisible state gives him such an edge that his assignment would be simple, but he chooses to abuse his power to amuse himself. Madness or just immaturity, it's for you to decide. Regardless, his hijinks make a simple job difficult, allowing enough time for a feature length picture.
A must for Peter Lorre fans, and Sir Cedric Hardwicke and Ilona Massey are here too. Word has it that the star, Jon Hall, was a big action star of the day, so anyone who has heard of him and enjoys his work might want to give this one a look too, though you won't see much of him.
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