Jalsaghar (The Music Room) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jalsaghar (The Music Room) Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ November 8, 2015
Ray exhibits a complete and enviable control of his camera behind this sumptuous drama that deserves credit even more for its elegant, classic direction and noteworthy formal rigor than for an impeccable narrative about a proud, stubborn man who refuses to become obsolete.
rubystevens
Super Reviewer
August 6, 2011
a raja in his crumbling palace cares for nothing but music as the world moves on without him. a very touching portrait of a man who loses everything, the most beautiful of ray's films i have yet seen, and his first criterion edition! it helps if u like indian music :)
Super Reviewer
½ July 12, 2011
A look at the end of an era and of one man's fading away from this world and all that he knew and loved. What a universal and real, albeit super sad and depressing, film that captures time gone by. It's a intimate look at a man named Huzur Biswambhar Roy as he has survived through the years (Both his wife and son have died) and with each passing one, he is left behind from the consistently evolving modern world around him. He decides that he will throw one last grand event in order to relive the more happy past. This is my first film review of a Satajit Ray film and a nice and beautiful introduction to the profound Director's works, most of which I will one day view! Jalsaghar (The Music Room) gives a beautiful perspective of a culture gone by and the traditions involved. Recommended!
September 27, 2012
It's both critical and sympathetic of the main character (Roy). And that is what makes it so engrossing and ultimately heartbreaking.
½ March 26, 2012
I don't like American music that much, much less the shrieking of foreigners. With that bit of my racism out of the way, the story and theme are familiar: man has it all but eventually exits Earth with nothing but a concussion.
September 13, 2011
One of the best films I have seen in quite some time. It is a character-piece, but uses music to bring about action that would otherwise be bland. The cinematography is stark and perfectly stated. The details convey meaning beyond their own intrinsic elegance. Perfectly acted... truly a work of beauty.
½ April 25, 2007
I don't get why this film is so highly regarded among Ray's other work. Sure it might be the most exquisitely shot film by Ray thus far. The use of mirrors was pretty clever. I don't think Ray's portrayal of the new wealthy class was fair, in fact the protagonist doesn't come off as a more sympathetic character than the rich and uncultured neighbor he despises.
½ March 27, 2009
I haven't seen a ton of films from India, but I am willing to say Satyajit Ray may be Indian cinema's greatest export. Besides Pather Panchali, this is another prime example of his artistry.
½ July 2, 2008
Just as compelling as any part of the Apu Trilogy. It's glorious filmmaking, a spellbinding morality tale of pride. The song and dance are appropriately dazzling.
Super Reviewer
½ July 12, 2011
A look at the end of an era and of one man's fading away from this world and all that he knew and loved. What a universal and real, albeit super sad and depressing, film that captures time gone by. It's a intimate look at a man named Huzur Biswambhar Roy as he has survived through the years (Both his wife and son have died) and with each passing one, he is left behind from the consistently evolving modern world around him. He decides that he will throw one last grand event in order to relive the more happy past. This is my first film review of a Satajit Ray film and a nice and beautiful introduction to the profound Director's works, most of which I will one day view! Jalsaghar (The Music Room) gives a beautiful perspective of a culture gone by and the traditions involved. Recommended!
Super Reviewer
½ November 8, 2015
Ray exhibits a complete and enviable control of his camera behind this sumptuous drama that deserves credit even more for its elegant, classic direction and noteworthy formal rigor than for an impeccable narrative about a proud, stubborn man who refuses to become obsolete.
September 27, 2012
It's both critical and sympathetic of the main character (Roy). And that is what makes it so engrossing and ultimately heartbreaking.
½ December 28, 2014
A pretty good story of poverty and prosperity. However, the amount of music in this film is probably the most you would hear in an Indian film without it actually being of the "Bollywood" ilk.
November 13, 2014
One of the most outstanding movies I have ever seen.
May 2, 2010
A long time ago, I was mesmerized by footage of Roshan Kumari dancing on television -- which turned out to be a clip from Satyajit Ray's The Music Room. When I finally saw the complete film, I wrote: "Another tale of the fading landed gentry superseded by the nouveau riche, but Satyajit Ray's film is made ecstatic by the intense Indian classical music, the chiaroscuro lighting, and the decadence and decay on display." However, there are so many sublime moments of musical performance (diegetic and non-diegetic) and such a melancholy air to the proceedings that this film (and Ray himself) must be elevated to the pantheon.
½ April 15, 2014
in this slow-paced masterpiece, Satyajit Ray shows us a man's self-destruction process, driven by his own pride and stubbornness. Biswas' performance as a landlord is unforgettable.
January 5, 2014
Perhaps the greatest of all Indian films
January 14, 2013
A deeply affectionate celebration of music while balancing with masterful cinematography and a captivating performance by Biswas. The emotional tension in the film grows consistently and plays heavily onto the heart.
September 7, 2013
watched this years ago and it was great.
ElCochran90
Super Reviewer
June 18, 2013
Top class Indian actors, Satyajit Ray's impeccable direction, music and dance intertwine in a tale of moral decay overwhelmed by the heavy weight of material shallowness. Chhabi Biswas deserves full credit as the nobleman that longs for a past that is long gone and wishes everything around him, even family blood, to be destroyed so that his external circumstances can satisfy his perception of reality and his interpretation of past memories for his persona. Jalsagharcomes out todat as a multi-layered masterpiece of self-destruction as a downward spiral.

Full review coming someday...

100/100
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