The Mouse and His Child - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Mouse and His Child Reviews

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August 2, 2013
It might not have the sharpest animation, but with its philosophical themes and fun jazz tunes, The Mouse and His Child can be both thought provoking and equal parts heartwarming.
October 27, 2015
A superb and clever piece of animation. "Do what you're wound up to do, not what you want to do."
September 12, 2014
An animation that's often weird and occasionally dark but ultimately insubstantial.
June 24, 2014
Wow, that was dark. I've seen a lot of disturbing things in movies but this is the first time I've ever watched a film where a child gets bludgeoned to death. I doubt a movie with a scene like that will ever be rated G again.
August 2, 2013
It might not have the sharpest animation, but with its philosophical themes and fun jazz tunes, The Mouse and His Child can be both thought provoking and equal parts heartwarming.
December 3, 2012
This hidden gem is a great find. It's very dark, intelligently written with acclaimed voice actors. The animation style is beautifully old-fashioned (reminiscent of The Secret of Nimh) and the story is heart-breaking. It gets surprisingly surreal and quite epic in the end. They sure don't make them like this anymore. In some respects it's as much for adults as it is for kids. It's worth tracking down this haunting little jewel, especially if you enjoy animation that is slightly odd and esoteric.
April 5, 2012
I used to watch this film a lot as a child, even now there are a couple of places in the film that will bring tears to my eyes. It's a very moving film that poses a lot of interesting questions, most of which as a child you'll miss and will only pick up on as an adult. It's certainly not a happy film but it is a beautiful one & I wish they would release it on DVD.
½ December 4, 2011
It's amazing how the wind-ups and their allies defeated Manny's rat empire.
April 14, 2009
This movie is FUCKED UP! Or rather, the story is a fucked-up one. As a child, I could never connect with the film, and thought it was just stupid. Something brought me back to it as an adult and I was surprised at how much depth I clearly missed when I was younger.

The movie is chock-full of flaws, from bad pacing to bad image-scaling (characters sometimes appear smaller than others and sometimes they're all the same size), but the story triumphs over the film's production values. Sociological, psychological, political and religious themes all abound in this movie, concluding with a theme I consider very important - redemption.

The film may have been ahead of its time and lacking an audience, both on merits of maturity, but there's no better time than now to revisit this underrated tale.
½ February 5, 2006
'The Mouse and His Child' is a children's film about a father and son toy mouse who are part of the same toy but who have the desire to be separated so they can wind themselves. The two become separated, and they meet several interesting characters along the way and at the hands of a troublesome rat. At one point, while trying to find their way back, they talk about 'infinity' and there is a never-ending cycle or puzzle in the picture (and inner picture) on a tin of dog food, and this picture repeats into infinity. This is a darker and deeper children's film, and it's not one of those films where everything is happy and content. This is a film that will make you think, and it is one that will be remembered. I remember it now, fifteen years after I last saw it. This is a film determined to let children see what life is about instead of sugar-coating it. It is sad and uncomfortable at times, and there are not any answers in black or white, good or evil. It's a film that is mature in its approach and honest in its portrayal of life and the world. I believe that this film should be shown to children to help them understand life better; I believe that this true-to-life and slightly-disturbing film should be shown along with other children's films (Bambi, Toy Story, etc.) so children can learn and further develop and understand that the world is not always a sweet place that some films portray it to be.
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